Cold Water and Your Voice

Report
Cold Water and Your
Voice: How does the water
affect your range?
Ashley Dobson
Hyde
8th Grade
Topic Question:
• Does drinking cold water before
singing effect how high a person can
sing?
Hypothesis:
• I think that if a
person drinks cold
water before singing,
they will not be able
to sing as high as they
could without drinking
cold water because cold water has a numbing
effect on the throat that makes it more difficult
for the vocal part to work properly.
Abstract
• In this project, I determined whether cold water has a
positive or negative effect on your vocal range.
• I hypothesized that if a person drinks cold water, they will
not be able to sing as high as they could without drinking it.
• I tested this using four girls, all around the same weight and
size. For each test, I had each girl sing a G scale. Then,
they drank a cup of cold water (42 degrees Fahrenheit) and
sang the scale again. I recorded whether they could sing
higher before the water or after it.
• I concluded that cold water has a negative effect on your
vocal range, making you not able to sing as high as you
could without it.
Materials:
• Four singers around
the same age. (8-9)
• Four cups of the
same amount of
water and the same
temperature. (42
degrees Fahrenheit)
• Piano
• Water thermometer
• Measuring Cup
Variables:
Manipulated (Independent):
• Whether the singer drank cold water or no water.
Responding (Dependent):
• How high each singer can sing on a G scale. (Do,
Re, Me, Fa, So, La, Ti, Do)
Controlled:
• The amount and temperature of the water.
• The scale each singer sings on.
• Whether the singer has drunken or eaten anything
for thirty minutes before the experiment.
• The age of the singers. (8-9)
Step-By-Step Procedures:
• Gather four singers (Dana, Anna Whatley, Olivia, and
Claire) around the same age. (8-9)
• Make sure the singers haven’t drunken or eaten anything
for at least thirty minutes before the experiment.
• Have one singer sing a G scale (Do, Re, Me, Fa, So, La,
Ti, Do) along with the piano until they can’t sing any
higher.
• Record how high the singer sung.
• Repeat this process with the other three singers.
• Fill a cup with ¼ cup of water, using a measuring cup.
• Make sure the water is 42 degrees Fahrenheit with the
thermometer.
Step-By-Step Procedures: (cont.)
• Have the first singer
drink the water.
• Immediately after
drinking, have the singer
sing the G scale again
(Do, Re, Me, Fa, So, La,
Ti, Do) along with the
piano until they can’t sing any higher.
• Record how high the singer sung.
• Repeat this process with the other three singers.
• Determine whether each singer’s range was higher
without drinking water or after drinking cold water.
Data
Singer:
Without
Water
Dana
Reached
the end of
G scale
(Do)
With Cold Reached
Water
“So” on
the G
scale
Anna
Whatley
Olivia
Claire
Reached
the end of
G scale
(Do)
Reached
“Fa” on
the G
scale
Reached
the end of
G scale
(Do)
Reached
“Fa” on
the G
scale
Reached
the end of
G scale
(Do)
Reached
“So” on
the G
scale
Note Reached on G scale
Note Singer’s Reached With and
Without Water
Singer
Key:
Do-1
Re-2
Me-3
Fa-4
So-5
La-6
Ti-7
Do-8
Results:
• I claim that drinking
cold water made the
singers not be able to
sing as high as they
could without drinking
water.
• I claim this because
before drinking water,
each singer reached
the end of the G
scale, but after
drinking cold water
they weren’t able to
reach the end.
Conclusion:
• In this experiment I learned that drinking cold
water before singing causes you to be unable to
sing as high of notes as you can without drinking
cold water.
• I know this because each singer in my experiment
wasn’t able to reach the end of the G scale after
drinking cold water, and before drinking water they
were able to.
• My hypothesis was correct because I said that
drinking cold water would make you not be able to
sing as high, and that’s exactly what happened.
Application
• This project can be applied to
real life if you are a singer.
Knowing how cold water effects
your vocal range can help
singers know what to drink
before a performance. Because
the outcome was that cold water makes your vocal range
smaller by numbing your throat, singers would know not to
drink cold drinks before a performance. Instead, they could
drink room temperature drinks. That way they can have an
overall better performance.
Citations:
• “Cold Water and Your Voice.” All Science Fair Projects.
29 Nov 2011. <http://www.all-science-fairprojects.com/project1127_40_1.html>
• Kristina Seleshanko. “Things that Affect Your Voice.”
VoiceStudio. 2 Feb 2007. 2 Dec 2011. <
http://voicestudio.kristinaseleshanko.com/ThingsThatAffe
ctYourVoice.htm>
• Dr. Barbara Mathis. “Singers, Let’s Prevent Vocal
Problems!” Voice Teacher. 2003. 2 Dec 2011. <
http://www.voiceteacher.com/mathis.html>
The End

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