Tier II Intervention Strategies - Empowering Education Consultation

Report
Positive School Culture
Tier II Systems
Tier II Intervention
Strategies
In today’s session we will:
Review the foundations of effective Tier II systems of support
Accessing data for Tier II decision making
Discuss how to match students to the appropriate intervention
strategy
Examine the characteristics of a strong intervention
Examine four specific Tier II intervention strategies
Practice developing Tier II intervention plans
Discuss applying corrective consequences
Building Tier II supports on a strong
foundation
4
5
In order to maximize the benefits of
Tier II supports it is critical to build
on a strong foundation of prevention.
6
School-Wide Standards
Clear Expectations
Comprehensive Instruction
Systems of Encouragement
School-Wide Standards
Systems of Correction
Data Collection
Data Analysis
School-Wide Standards
Professional Development
Leadership
Tiers of Support
School-Wide Practices
Classroom
Supports
Community
Connections
Bullying
Prevention
Tier I Review
Activity
For your assigned PSC
Tier I Standard or
Practice, describe the
following:
What does the
standard/practice
mean?
What is the purpose of
the standard/practice?
A school example of
the standard/practice
11
Tier II Data-based Decisions
Enter Data from Confidential Building Referral
Record to Create Accurate COGNOS Reports
Accurate Data In
Accurate Reports Out
Student identifying information
Referral Per Day Per Enrollment
Location
Top 5 Locations
Incidents
Possible Motivation
Administrative Corrective Consequence
Date & Signature
Top 5 Incidents
Students with 2-5 Referrals**
Top 5 Administrative Consequences
1. Staffnet
2. Departments
3. Information
& Technology
Management
SCHOOL WIDE
PSC TEAM
4. Left Barfrequently
used links
5. SIS Web
Systems
6. COGNOS
7. Web
Reports
COGNOS 8
8. Username
and
Password
SCHOOL WIDE
PSC TEAM
9. Positive
School
Culture Plan
10. PSCP Top
5
2-5 Referrals, or Second Top 20 to
Select Students for Tier II Supports
Using Dashboard Data to Select
Students for Tier II Supports
Intervention
Teams, Learning
Teams, Data
Teams,
Horizontal,
Vertical, Grade
Level, Content
Area…
A review of the essential components
Tier II Systems of Support Provide Students
Rapid Access to Targeted Interventions
Built on the foundation of a strong
core program
Proactively planned and easily
accessible
Decreases the number of
students needing intensive
intervention
Prepares for effective and efficient
Response to Intervention Process
19
Characteristics of Tier II Supports:
Instruction is more explicit, and intensive,
than school-wide Tier Instruction
Student progress is monitored more
frequently
Systematic, timely and focused
Provided within general education
Design, implemented and monitored by an
intervention team
Spring 2008
In order to systemically implement and then
sustain targeted interventions, it is critical to
have a strong infrastructure in place. This
infrastructure is what we refer to as the Tier II
systems of support. If schools fail to put in
place the components to strategically
implement and then monitor the
implementation and impact of targeted
interventions, interventions for students
become sporadic, disconnected from schoolwide expectations, difficult to manage and
often unsustainable.
Process
Selecting students
serving students,
informing
implementers, teachers,
students and parents;
using data
Tier II intervention
Structures teams implementers,
location etc.
Resources
Intervention
materials, supports
for implementers
Tier II Systems of Support
Critically Examining Your Tier II
Behavior Systems of Support
23
Assess your Tier II Systems of Support
Read each Tier II Practice
Discuss the extent of implementation of each component in
your school
Rate level of implementation of each Tier II practice
Prioritize the top three areas to strengthen your school’s
implementation
The importance of an hypothesis
What Are Targeted Interventions?
Targeted Interventions provide
sufficient and appropriate systematic
instruction so that students identified
as at risk for not reaching behavior
standards rapidly reach or exceed
established standards thereby
preventing school failure.
26
All the following characteristics must
in place to ensure quality a
intervention process
Interventions should
align with content
and expectations.
Interventions should
have a proven record
of effectiveness.
Interventions must
be implemented
with integrity and
monitored closely.
Intervention
selection is a product
of a problem solving
process.
Springmyer IBS Training 2003-03, S.Skelton
Matching students to appropriate targeted
supports is the key to success…
Define the
specific problem
areas.
Mismatch between current behavior and desired behavior in
observable and measurable terms.
Generate a
hypothesis about
why the problem
is occurring.
Skill Deficit (Can’t do) or
Determine the
function for the
behavior
Using information about what happens before and after the behavior
occurs, determine whether the student is exhibiting the behavior to
gain control, attention or to escape/avoid something or someone.
Match targeted
intervention to
the hypothesis.
Skill deficit = Social Skill Instruction to address the function
Performance Deficit (Won’t do)
Performance deficit = Interventions to motivate student to exhibit
appropriate way to address the function
Hypothesis
Intervention
A hypothesis is …
A data-based deduction about why the
problem is occurring.
An informed prediction about the actions
or strategies that will likely resolve the
problem situation
Interventions are matched to the hypothesis not
the problem.
Problem: Car won’t start
Hypothesis Intervention
Low Battery
Recharge Battery
No Gas
Gas Car
Carburetor
Malfunction
Repair Carburetor
Bad Transmission
New Transmission
Wrong Key
Correct key
The hypothesis about why the behavior is occurring
and what function the behavior serves leads to the
most appropriate intervention
Hypotheses
Control
Intervention focus
 Predictable schedules or
routines
 Consequences for both
positive and negative
behaviors
 Provide opportunities for the
student to make decisions
 Providing extra opportunities
for the student to exercise
Instructional
objective
To teach student
appropriate ways to
exhibit control over his
environment
Hypotheses
Attention
Intervention focus
Instructional
objective
 Provide opportunities for
the student to receive extra
attention when behaving
appropriately
To reinforce the
student for
demonstrating
appropriate behavior
 Ignore inappropriate
/annoying behavior (if it is
not dangerous to do so)
 Offer frequent positive
feedback about behavior
Hypotheses
Intervention focus
Instructional
objective
Avoid/escape
Determine whether or not it is necessary for To decrease the
the student to engage in the activity or task. student’s need
 Determine if the
student is trying to
avoid a situation
because of academic
skill deficits.
to avoid or
If yes,
escape a task or
 Provide ways of supporting the student in situation
Often behavior
problems cause
serving the function
of avoidance are
linked to reading,
writing or math
problems.
the uncomfortable setting or activity by:
 Removing extra demands placed on
the student.
 Teaching the student the skills to
make participation in setting or
activity more tolerable.
 Introduce the student to the activity
or setting in increments to allow the
student to become more
comfortable in the setting or
engaging in the activity
If no, allow the student freedom to choose
an alternate activity
Problem

Carlos is in the 3rd grade. He
often argues with classmates
and with the teacher during
independent seatwork. He
rarely completes his class
assignments and never turns
in homework. Carlos has
turned in 4 out of 10
classroom assignments and he
currently has zero homework
points.
Hypotheses: A data-based deduction about
why the problem is occurring.

Carlos argues with classmates and the
teacher during independent seatwork and
does not complete assignments in order
to avoid/escape classwork that is too
difficult for him and he does not have
the skills to appropriately address his
frustration when he is having difficulty
with classwork.
Hypotheses: An informed prediction
about the actions or strategies that will
likely resolve the problem situation
 If
Intervention
focus
Carlos receives explicit instruction
in how to regulate his emotions
Intervention
focus
appropriately
when he gets frustrated
with classwork and receives
instructional support with needed
academic skills then he will decrease
his disruptive arguing behavior.
Tier II Interventions for Carlos
Teach coping skills
Provide academic
instructional support
Social Skills Group
Tutoring
Cognitive Behavioral
Instruction
Extra Instruction
Extra academic support
provided during class
assignments
Social Story
Evidence-based and Promising Tier II
interventions
Elements of a strong intervention
Direct instruction of the new
skill
Frequent chances to practice
newly learned skill
Immediate and clear feedback
of progress towards a set goal.
Corrective feedback delivered
in a positive way
Close monitoring of student
progress
Example Interventions: View and Discuss
Interventions for Skill
Needs
• Behavioral Cognitive Strategies
• Social Stories
Interventions for
Performance Need
• Peer Mentoring
• Mystery Motivator
Intervention Strategies Video Activity
In your team:
• View each narrated
presentations on the 4
presented interventions.
• Make notes.
• After viewing the each
presentation, debrief
with your team.
When viewing each presentation note
the following:
Key points about the intervention
The supports/materials or resources needed for the
intervention
When is it appropriate to use the intervention
Whether the intervention is a promising practice or an
evidence-based practice
Group Processing Activity
Individually
Think about
additional questions
you have about the
implementation of
the 4 interventions
presented.
In pairs
Discuss your
implementation
questions.
In quads
Discuss the resources
you have in your
school that can
support the
implementation of one
or more of the
intervention strategies
shown in the videos.
Practice Scenario
Define the problem
Generate a hypothesis about why
the problem is occurring and the
function the problem behavior is
serving
Determine intervention focus
Providing behavior instruction when
applying correction for behavior
infractions.
What happens when a student
requires a corrective consequence?
If it is necessary to provide a corrective
consequence to a student, the disciplinary
action should be instructional. It is also
important to make sure that the student is
not being “punished” because his or her
cultural practices differ from the teacher’s
or school expectations and haven’t been
taught school-wide expectations.
Corrective consequence for minor behavior infractions
Stop disruptive misbehavior.
Name the behavior and explain how it violates classroom rules and schoolwide expectations
Remain calm and speak in a matter-of-fact manner.
Follow through consistently on promised consequences.
Redirect misbehavior in positive directions.
If necessary, talk with students privately about misbehavior. Ask how you
can help.
Address problem behavior
immediately
Applying corrective consequence for
major behavior infractions
Be firm, fair and consistent
Name the behavior, describe
what happened and label it for
the student
Tell the student the school-wide
expected behavior that the
infraction violated
Investigate what happened
before, during and after the
behavior
Apply a consequence that
allows the student to restore
relationships and the learning
community
Restorative Consequences
Based on Restorative justice this approach to
behavior correction focuses on the needs of victims,
students who commit behavior infractions, and the
learning community, instead of only punishing the
student in who committed a behavior infraction.
Students are encouraged to take responsibility for
their actions, "to repair the harm they've done.”
First, help the student to
understand that the victim
of their infraction and the
learning community have
both been affected by the
student’s action and
restoration is necessary.
Three key ideas that
support restorative
consequence
Second, the student is
makes amends with both
the victim and the learning
community.
Third, is the concept of
“healing.” This is healing for the
victim, as well as meeting the
student who engaged in the
behavior infractions personal
needs.
Repairing the harm
Community
• Help the student articulate how his/her behavior impacts the
learning community
Accountability
• Assigning appropriate consequences
Reciprocity
• Mending relationships
Empowerment
• Enable student (s) to impact the community positively through
actions (Restoration agreement)
3 -2-1 Discussion
• 3 Key take-aways from
this course
• 2 Immediate next steps
to forward tier II work at
your school
• 1Thing that could
improve this session
There can be no keener
revelation of a society's soul
than the way in which it
treats its children.”
Nelson Mandela

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