5E presentation for new teacher

Report
Materials needed for session:
Cardstock (one piece per participant) = 100
Strips of paper (5 pieces per participant) = 500
*125 sheets of paper cut into 4 sections
Buttons (one per group) = 10
Straws (one per group – cannot be reused) = 45
Rulers (one per group) = 10
Timer (to measure 10 seconds) = 1 for teacher
Toy cars (one per group) = 10
Zip-lock bag for materials (one per group) = 10
Music player and CD for freeze tag
Presented by Deedie Jones, GPISD Teacher Coach
Modified from a presentation by Jennifer Payne ESC Region 14
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The 5-E model is the GPISD initiative for designing a lesson that
emphasizes the active role of the learner(s) in building understanding and
making sense of the world. The teacher sets up problems, monitors
student exploration, guides student inquiry, and promotes new patterns of
thinking.
Learning Goals:
– Review or learn the parts of the 5-E Instruction Model.
– Experience a 5-E lesson with special emphasis on the
essence of each E.
 – Become familiar with components of 5-E Instructional
Model and strategies used for implementation.


Engage
E
Explore
E
Elaborate
E
Explain
E
Evaluate
E

5-E Model is based on the SCIS Model of Instruction by
researchers Atkins and Karplus in 1967.

5-E Model was originally proposed by BSCS (Biological
Science Curriculum Study) in the late 1980’s.

5-E Model became a GPISD initiative in 2007 and
continues to be the framework for lesson design that
include strategies for active learning, student
engagement and specific instructional focus, based on
data analysis.
Materials Needed:
1 sheet of card stock
5 strips of paper
1 Marker
Make a foldable to capture thoughts about 5-E model.
1.
Evaluate
Elaborate
Explain
Explore
Engage
Label each of 5 strips with each of the 5-E’s, near the top.
2. Fold the cardstock to create a display tray.
3. Add important information to each strip, then display on tray.
Engage
Definition:
•Generate Interest
•Access prior knowledge
•Frame the idea
Teacher:
-Creates interest
-Raises questions
-Encourages responses
Activities:
- Asks questions
- Demonstrates interest
- Connects concepts
Engage
Engage description

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focus student’s attention
stimulate thinking
generate interest
access prior knowledge
frame the learning
symbol to indicate
information for
foldable

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Create Interest
Motivate
Ask for student’s input
Hook content to student interest
Connect to prior knowledge
Create emotional connection
Raise questions and encourage response
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Demonstration/Question
Manipulative activity
Analyze an illustration
Interactive Reading
KWL/KNLQ
Forced Associations
Brainstorming Activity
Connect past and present
Frames the idea
Think of a concept in your content area
symbol to
indicate
processing time
that you will teach this year:
a novel, math concept, event in history,
music genre, rules to a game, disease
prevention, classification, letter sounds,
computer skill, etc.
What can you do to engage the students?
Students with engage
emphasized instruction:
 Increased Performance:
 Overall Student Achievement – 9%
 Special Population Achievement – 18%
▪ Why?
symbol to
indicate
additional
information
Brainstorm with your table partners all
of the words you can think of to
describe force, or ways of
showing force.
symbol to
indicate active
participation
Now discuss forces of nature symbol to
indicate active
participation
Explore description:

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Discover new skills
Experience, Think and Investigate
Probe, Inquire, Collect Information
Question, Test, Make Decisions
Establish Relationships and Understanding
Problem Solve

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Facilitate the learning
Incorporate strategies for all learning styles
Observe and listen to the students as they
interact
Ask probing questions
Redirect the students when needed
Structure time
Encourage cooperative learning

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Perform an Investigation
Read to Collect Information
Construct a Model
Learn and practice a skill
Manipulate data/information
Solve a Problem
Participate in Discussion
Cooperative Learning Activities
Think of a concept in your content area
that you will teach this year:
a novel, math concept, event in history,
music genre, rules to a game, disease
prevention, classification, letter sounds,
computer skill, etc.
What strategies can you incorporate in your
lesson that will help students explore new
knowledge and skills?
Students with explore emphasized instruction:

Increased Performance:
 Overall Student Achievement – 6%
 Special Population Achievement – 13%
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Materials Needed:
Form groups (3 per group)
1 button
Select team members
1 straw
1 ruler
 1 person to provide the force
 1 ruler reader
 1 data recorder
You will have 10 seconds to see how far you can
force your button to move from one end of your
table to the other, using only wind through a straw.
You may not touch the button with your straw.
Estimate your distance in cm.
Test, then measure your distance in centimeters.
This activity is from CSCOPE 3rd Grade Unit 3- Investigating Forces Lesson 1, with some modifications.
Explain description:
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Analyze exploration
Communicate New Understandings
Understanding is clarified and modified
through a reflective activity
Concepts, processes or skills become
plain, comprehensible and clear
Define terms relative to the learning
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Encourage the students to explain concepts
and definitions in their own words
Ask for clarification and justification
(evidence)
Provide definitions, new words, and
explanations
Use students’ previous experiences as basis
for explaining concepts
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Student Analysis & Explanation
Demonstration with Student Talk
Supporting Ideas with Evidence
Graphic Organizers – Thinking Maps
Structured Questioning, Reading and
Discussion
Teacher Further Questions or Explains
connections
Thinking Skill Activities: compare, classify,
summarize, error analysis, and interprets
Students with explain emphasized instruction:
 Increased Performance:
 Overall Student Achievement – 6%
 Special Population Achievement – 12%
Freeze Tag Answers:
When the music begins, stand up and walk
around the room.
When the music stops, pair up with someone
closest to you.
One person answer the first question, the
other answer the second.
When the music begins again, walk around.
When the music stops, pair up and continue
the same pattern with the next two
questions.
When the music starts, return to your seat.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Compare the estimated, and actual,
measurements recorded in the button
activity.
Describe the force that was used to make
the button move.
Explain how friction and gravity affect the
movement of your button?
How could you change your experiment to
make the button move along the table
faster than before?
Elaborate (Extend) description:
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Expand and solidify student thinking
Apply new learning to a new or similar
situation
Provide reasonable conclusions
Use new information in a real-world situation.
Extend and explain concept being explored
Communicate new understanding with formal
academic language
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Use previously learned information as a
vehicle to enhance additional learning
Encourage the students to apply or extend
the concepts and skills in new situations
Encourage students to use new terms and
definitions
Act as a consultant

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Problem Solving within a new context
Decision Making
Experimental Inquiry
Thinking Skill Activities: compare, classify,
apply, judge, conclude, synthesize and
extend
Extended Reading
How could you use
this book to
support
ELABORATION?
The important thing about
gravity is that it is always there.
It is invisible but it is something
we all share.
It pulls things down through the
air.
The important thing about
gravity is that it is always there.
Margaret Wise Brown
Students with elaborate emphasized
instruction:
 Increased Performance:
 Overall Student Achievement – 1%
 Special Population Achievement – 14%
Talk with your group How could you make a toy car move along
the table, using the wind through a straw?
 Compare the difference between the amount
of force used to make the button move, to
the amount of force needed to move the car.
 Using the terms – greater than, less than,
gravity, force of wind, increased mass, and
friction – describe the science behind making
the toy car move faster than the button.
Using the acquired knowledge about the force of wind,
share with your elbow partner some observations you
have made from looking at the pictures above.
What explanation can you provide for the second picture,
based on your reasonable conclusions?
Evaluate description:
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Shows evidence of accomplishment
Allows the teacher to assess student
performance and/or understandings of
concepts, skills, processes, an applications.
Demonstrate understanding of new concept
by observation or open-ended response.
Student is demonstrates evidence of
understanding.
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Observe the students as they apply new concepts
and skills
Assess students’ knowledge and/or skills
Look for evidence that the students have changed
their thinking or behaviors
Encourage students to assess their own learning
Ask open-ended questions, such as:
 – Why do you think …. ?
 – What evidence do you have regarding …. ?
 – What do you know about …. ?
 – How would you explain …. ?
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Activities scored using a rubric
Performance assessment
Produce a product
Journal entries
Peer Feedback Response
Problem-based Learning Scenarios
Portfolio
Bloom’s Higher Level Questioning
Measuring & Counting: How many? How long? How much?
Comparison (for sharper observation): In how many ways
are _______ alike and how do they differ?
Action: What happens if you ……..? …get caught in a
tornado while driving a car?
Problem-posing (more sophisticated, follows exploration &
understanding, not a good first question): Can you find a
way to… capture the objects caught in a tornado? Can you
find evidence of other forces in nature? How can you
construct a building that will withstand the speeds of wind in
a tornado? Can you make a machine that works from the
force of wind generated by a tornado’s storm?
Using the rubric for criteria reference,
create a PowerPoint game focused
on “forces of nature”.
Share with your table group.
Use peer scoring sheet after you play
the game, then tally the points
awarded the game creator to get
their grade.
Students with evaluate emphasized
instruction:
 Increased Performance:
 Overall Student Achievement - 17%
 Special Population Achievement – 12%

Generate a Frayer with blank paper
Define:
Examples:
Visual Representation:
5-E
Model
Non-Examples:
Administrators
 How will 5E instruction look in walkthroughs?
PDAS connections
 How can the 5E model support what you do
as campus leaders?
 How can you support your campus?
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What are the benefits to teachers?
Will this instructional model be an easy fit for
every teacher?
What are questions teachers have about the
5E lessons?
How can administrators help support
classroom instruction?
Learning Goals:



– Review or learn the parts of the 5-E
Instruction Model.
– Experience a 5-E lesson with special
emphasis on the essence of each E.
– Become familiar with components of 5-E
Instructional Model and strategies used for
implementation.

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