Lesson 5 - ITS New Mexico

Report
Lesson 5
NATIONAL
TRAFFIC INCIDENT MANAGEMENT (TIM)
RESPONDER TRAINING PROGRAM
LAW ENFORCEMENT | FIRE | EMS | TRANSPORTATION
TOWING & RECOVERY | COMMUNICATIONS
Lesson 5
Lesson 5:
Scene Safety
5-1
Lesson 5
Lesson Objectives
At the conclusion of this lesson, participants will
be able to:
1. Describe how emergency vehicle markings
can improve scene safety
2. Describe recommendations for emergencyvehicle lighting as set forth in the MUTCD
3. Describe high-visibility safety apparel
requirements for incident responders
5-2
Lesson 5
Emergency Vehicle Markings
5-3
Lesson 5
National Fire Protection Association
(NFPA) Standards
NFPA1901 – Standard for
Automotive Fire Apparatus (2009)
NFPA 1917 – Standard for
Automotive Ambulances (2013)
• At least 50% of the rear vertical
surfaces of the apparatus shall be
equipped with 6 inch (minimum)
retroreflective striping, alternating
yellow and red, in a chevron
pattern sloping downward and
away from the centerline of the
vehicle at an angle of 45°
5-4
Lesson 5
National Fire Protection Association
(NFPA) Standards
NFPA1901 – Standard for
Automotive Fire Apparatus (2009)
NFPA 1917 – Standard for
Automotive Ambulances (2013)
• Any door of the apparatus have
at least 96 in2 (60 in2 for vertically
hinged doors on ambulances)of
retroreflective material affixed to
the inside of the door
• A 4 inch retroreflective stripe be
affixed to at least 50% of the cab
and body length on each side
and at least 25% of the width of
the front of the apparatus
5-5
Lesson 5
Fire Apparatus Vehicle Markings
Photos Courtesy of the City of Oak Creek Fire Department (WI)
5-6
Lesson 5
Law Enforcement Vehicle Markings
5-7
Lesson 5
Law Enforcement Vehicle Markings
– New Vs. Old
5-8
Lesson 5
Safety Service Patrol
Vehicle Markings
5-9
Lesson 5
Emergency-Vehicle Lighting
5-10
Lesson 5
MUTCD Section 6I.05 – Use of
Emergency-Vehicle Lighting
• Though essential for safety, use of too many lights
at an incident scene can be distracting and can
create confusion for approaching road users
5-11
Lesson 5
MUTCD Section 6I.05 – Use of
Emergency-Vehicle Lighting
• Too much lighting also makes it difficult to see
other responders operating around vehicles
5-12
Lesson 5
MUTCD Section 6I.05 – Use of
Emergency-Vehicle Lighting
5-13
Lesson 5
MUTCD Section 6I.05 – Use of
Emergency-Vehicle Lighting
• Once good traffic control is established,
the MUTCD recommends reducing the
amount of emergency-vehicle lighting
– Public safety agencies should examine
their policies on the use of emergencyvehicle lighting with the intent of reducing
the use of this lighting as much as possible
while not endangering those at the scene
5-14
Lesson 5
Student Activity 
5-15
Lesson 5
Student Activity 
• What impact did forward-facing lights have?
5-16
Lesson 5
Responder Visibility
MUTCD Section 6D.03 states:
All workers, including emergency
responders, within the right-of-way of a
roadway who are exposed either to traffic
(vehicles using the highway for purposes
of travel) or to work vehicles and
construction equipment SHALL wear highvisibility safety apparel…
5-17
Lesson 5
Driver Reaction and
Stopping Distances
At 60 mph:
• Vehicle travels 88
feet/second
• Reaction distance is
132 feet
• Total stopping
distance is 359 feet
• Low beam headlights
only illuminate160 feet
ahead of the vehicle
5-18
Lesson 5
Typical U.S. Crash Scene
5-19
Lesson 5
Emergency Responder
High-Visibility Safety Apparel
• Must meet, and be labeled as meeting one of two
standards:
– ANSI/ISEA 107, Standard Performance for:
• Class II
• Class III
– ANSI/ISEA 207, Public Safety Vests
5-20
Lesson 5
ANSI 107 Class II Safety Vest
5-21
Lesson 5
ANSI 107 Class III Safety Vest
– Has Sleeves
5-22
Lesson 5
ANSI 107 Class II Vest
ANSI 107 vs. ANSI 207
ANSI 207 Public Safety Vest
Note shorter length to allow
access to items on belt
5-23
Lesson 5
Shortcoming of Wearing No Vest!
5-24
Lesson 5
MUTCD Section 6D.03 Exceptions
• Firefighters or other responders engaged in
emergency operations that directly expose them
to flame, fire, heat, and/or hazardous materials
5-25
Lesson 5
MUTCD Section 6D.03 Exceptions
• Law enforcement when actively engaged in
potentially confrontational law enforcement
activities (i.e., tactical operations)
5-26
Lesson 5
Need a Vest Policy?
“If your feet are on the street, your vest is on your chest!”
5-27
End of Service Life
Lesson 5
• According to FHWA and the
American Traffic Safety
Services Association (ATSSA),
high-visibility safety apparel
should be replaced when it
becomes:
– Not visible at 1,000 feet day
or night
– Faded
– Soiled
– Torn
– Worn
– Dirty
– Defaced
5-28
Lesson 5
TIM Timeline
5-29
Lesson 5
Lesson Objectives Review
1.

Describe how emergency vehicle markings
can improve scene safety
2.

Describe recommendations for emergencyvehicle lighting as set forth in the MUTCD
3.

Describe high-visibility safety apparel
requirements for incident responders
5-30

similar documents