PowerPoint (Chapter 5) - Sites @ Brookdale Community College

Report
Introduction to Public Relations
COMM 106
Fall 2013
Instructor: Tara Rummell Berson
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
1
CHAPTER FIVE:
MANAGEMENT/
CREATING A PR PLAN
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
5-2
PR Management Process

As with management, public relations
demands clear strategies and bottom-line
objectives that flow into specific tactics.

For the PR function to be valuable to
management, it must remain independent,
credible, and objective as an honest
broker.
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
5-3
The boundary role
of public relations

According to Grunig
and Hunt, public
relations managers fill
a boundary role.

They function at the
edge of the
organization, as a
liaison between
internal and external
publics.
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
5-4
Reporting to top management? Not
always.
Unfortunately, not all PR reps get to
report directly to the CEO. Public
relations is sometimes looped in with
advertising, marketing, legal or human
resources.
 What are the dangers of public relations
reporting to these to these other
departments?

Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
5-5
The public relations department

Public relations professionals generally work
in one of two organizational structures:
As staff in the public
relations department
of a corporation,
university, hospital, etc.

As a line professional in a
public relations agency
Departments range from one-person
operations to huge networks with hundreds
of people.
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
5-6
The public relations agency

Agencies generally organize according to
industries such as healthcare, sports,
finance or technology.

Agencies specialize in functions including
media relations, government relations,
social media and investor relations.

Account teams are assigned to specific
clients.
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
5-7
Pros/cons of the PR agency…
Advantages:
Disadvantages:
• Agencies are often used to
escape the “tunnel vision”
syndrome that often afflicts
organizations.
• They can provide
management with an
objective reading of public
concerns.
• Agencies are outsiders.
They may be unfamiliar with
internal details and
management’s operating
style.
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
5-8
Corporate/Client vs. Agency PR
◦ What do you think are the main differences
between working for an external agency and
an internal department? Which would you
prefer?
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
5-9
Where are the jobs?
Public relations promises a
strong future:
 Health care, consumer
and retail fields are
strong


High-tech sector will
need more and more
skilled professionals
Investor relations, crisis
management and other
specialties pay well

Public relations agencies
will continue to expand

Nonprofit: hospitals,
schools, museums, etc. all
need public relations

Employee
communications is
needed to win back trust
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
510
What does it pay?
Salaries vary by experience, location and sector:

Public relations agencies:
Companies and other enterprises:
Professional organizations:
Colleges and universities:
Local governments:

PR salaries




$118,350
$107,480
$100,720
$87,900
$74,710
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
511
PUBLIC RELATIONS
PLANS
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
512
Plan Components










Executive Summary
Background
Situation analysis (problems
and consequences)
Communication goals and
objectives
Audience identification and
messages
Audience objectives
Communication strategies
and tactics
Schedule
Budget
Evaluation plans
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
513
Communication goals and objectives
How are we
going to
communicate
with our
intended
audience?
How can we
measure
success in
communicating
our goals?
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
514
Setting public relations objectives
The only good goals are the ones that can
be measured.
 Test your objectives according to these
questions:

Do they clearly describe the end result expected?
Are they understandable to everyone?
Do they list a firm completion date?
Are they realistic, attainable and measurable?
Are they consistent with management’s objectives?
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
515
Audience identification and
messages
Who is the
intended
audience?
What
messages will
influence them?
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
516
Audience
What do they
care about?
What do you
want them to
do?
What’s your
company
Strategy?
What are
your key
messages
What’s your
comm
strategy?
How are you going to
measure your success?
Press
News
Write articles
with company’s
key messages
Increase market
position
Best
product
Proactive pitching
on market issues
(be the expert)
2x articles of any
Competitor
Products
that
address
customers’
needs
Consider
company as
source of
knowledge
2 messages in every article
Editorial boards
Keynotes/speakin
g engagements
Inclusion in competitors
articles
Position company
positively
Customer
Quality
Products/
Services
Specify,
recommend, buy
company’s
products
Increase customer
base
Be market leader
Lower cost
Trustworthiness
Satisfies need
Provide
products/services
that can be
differentiated from
competitors
Best
products
Leadership
gives
company
the
Visibility to
pick new
markets
Drive
consideration and
Preference by
providing
Products and
infrastructure
that customers
need
# Of qualified leads
% Increase in preference
Easy to do
Business
with
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
517
Strategies
Point-by-point rundown of the plan in
detail.
 Each objective needs to be linked with an
audience, a communication vehicle, and an
outcome.

Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
518
Schedule

Gantt chart of
the project, with
dates and key
personnel
assigned
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
519
Determine a Budget
Provide your client with your plan’s
overall budget
 Layout basic costs for your creative fees
(like developing key messages) and out-ofpocket expenses (like travel and food
expenses related to a media tour)

Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
520
Evaluation plans

How will success or
failure of the plan be
determined?
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
521
In-class BROSIE exercise
Set 2-3 objectives/goals for our Asbury
Park revitalization project (the whats)
 Develop your strategy/program elements
(the hows)
 Define your target audiences and target
messages
 Establish in advance how you want to
measure the success of your plan

Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
522
Objectives Overview


Define measurable objectives that are
specific milestones that measure progress
toward achievement of your business goals.
Objectives must:
◦ Address the desired communication or
behavioral outcome
◦ Designate the audiences among whom the
behavioral outcomes is to be recognized
◦ Specify the expected level of attainment or
accomplishment
◦ Identify the time frame in which those
attainments or accomplishments are to occur.
Portions Copyright © 2011 Pearson
Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall,
Portions (c) 2011 Tara R. Berson
523

similar documents