Design principles

Report
Design
principles
Design principles are ways
of arranging or organising
design elements.
Design principles
Focus
Space
Unity
Rhythm
Balance
Focus
Design principles - Focus
About focus
Focus is used to
centre attention.
Focus can be created
by contrasting
elements so that they
attract attention.
Design principles - Focus
The large light
coloured face stands
out from the darker
background.
Design principles - Focus
A bright colour stands
out against dull
colours, just as a loud
sound can stand out
against a quiet sound.
Design principles - Focus
Contrast and
placement are effective
ways to create focus.
Design principles - Focus
Dark tones stand out
over light tones.
Heavy lines stand out
more than thin lines.
Bold patterns stand out
more than fine
patterns.
Design principles - Focus
Size and
placement of text
and images should
relate the
importance of
information.
Strong colour
stands out more
than soft colour.
Design principles - Focus
Size and placement
of text and images
should relate the
importance of
information.
Lines and visual
rhythms can move
attention towards
a focal point.
Design principles - Focus
Some designs have
a single focal point.
In these designs,
the components are
arranged to
focus attention
towards this point.
Design principles - Focus
Other designs have
multiple focal points
for emphasis.
Design principles - Focus
Some designs do
not have a clear
focal point.
Repeated
elements are
used to keep the
eye moving
Design principles - Focus
Identifying
focal points
Primary focus
Secondary focus
Design principles - Focus
Primary focus
Secondary focus
Design principles - Focus
Primary focus
Secondary focus
Design principles - Focus
Primary focus
Secondary focus
Space
Design principles - Space
About space
Space is the area
in and around
something.
Designing involves
arranging design
elements in space.
Design principles - Space
Three-dimensional
designs have:
• form
• length
• width
• height
and occupy space.
Design principles - Space
Space can be
interior or exterior to
an object, for
example, a piece of
furniture or a
garment.
Design principles - Space
There is often a
close relationship
between a
three-dimensional
design and it’s
surrounding space.
Design principles - Space
Two-dimensional
designs are flat. They
are developed on a
two-dimensional
surface such as a
page, billboard, fabric
or digital screen.
Design principles - Space
Design elements
can be used in
two-dimensional
designs to create
an illusion of
three-dimensional
space or depth.
Design principles - Space
Linear perspective is a
mathematical method
of creating an illusion
of three-dimensional
space on a flat surface.
Design principles - Space
The relative sizes of
objects in space are
worked out using a
system involving lines
receding to a
vanishing point.
Design principles - Space
On a flat surface, a
larger shape or
form will appear
closer than a
smaller one.
Design principles - Space
Bright warm
colours tend to
advance in space
and appear closer
than dull, cool
colours which tend
to recede.
Unity
Design principles - Unity
About unity
Unity is achieved
when all of the
different elements
in a design work
together to create
a unified whole.
Design principles - Unity
Using harmonious
or closely related
elements in a design
can contribute to
unity. For example,
using only flowing,
curving lines, shapes
and forms.
Design principles - Unity
Repeating the same
elements throughout
a design can help
create unity.
Design principles - Unity
Overlapping design
elements can
contribute to unity
by creating a
relationship
between separate
elements.
Design principles - Unity
Linking elements can
contribute to unity.
Rhythm
Design principles - Rhythm
About rhythm
Rhythm is a feeling
of structured
movement created
by the repetition of
elements.
Design principles - Rhythm
Rhythm can be used
to create a sense of
movement in, through
or around a design.
Design principles - Rhythm
Rhythm is created by
the repetition of
elements.
Repeated elements
and the spaces
between them make
patterns that we
experience as rhythm.
Design principles - Rhythm
Repetition of
elements and spaces
create regular steady
rhythms that have a
feeling of order.
Design principles - Rhythm
Abstract placement of
elements and spaces
create irregular
rhythms that have a
sense of imbalance,
tensions and
expectation.
Balance
Design principles - Balance
About balance
Balance is achieved
when things are in
equilibrium. This is
commonly achieved
through an equal
weighting or
distribution of
elements within a
whole.
Design principles - Balance
Balance is important
because it can create
a feeling of stability.
Balance is achieved
by selecting and
arranging text and
images to control the
distribution of
‘weight’.
Design principles - Balance
Balance can be
achieved by placing an
object within a space.
The focus here is the
placement of the dozer.
The text is
used to balance the
image.
Design principles - Balance
Symmetry is created
by dividing a space
and the elements
within it equally.
Symmetry can
create order,
formality, calmness
and stillness.
Design principles - Balance
These designs have
asymmetrical balance.
When they are divided
down the middle, there
are different selections
and arrangements of
elements in each part.
Asymmetry can look
informal, natural and
energetic.
Design principles - Balance
Placement
Orientation
Value
Colour
Higher smaller square
has more energy
Smaller square
rotated off axis
equalizes energy
Darker value gives
smaller square
greater weight
Colour energizes
smaller square
Design principles - Balance
Defying gravity
creates greater
energy.
Resting is more
stable.

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