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Chapter 7 Summary
Implementing a Vision:
Strategy, Tactics and
Business Plan
Chapter 7
What is the chapter all about?
– The strategies, tactics, and business plans
necessary to implement a vision.
– Deciding what things are worth doing relative
to a business plan.
– Getting those things done!
Defining the Three Key
Elements
Vision: Identifies what the organization
wants to look like at some logical point in
the future.
 Strategy: How a company will achieve the
long-term goal of the vision.
 Tactics: More specific time-oriented,
measurable ways to make a vision a reality.

The Vision to Action
Process
Implementation
(Action)
Agreement &
Commitment
Tactics and
Business Plan
Strategy
Feedback
Vision
Sensing
Opportunity
Figure 6-1
When in Doubt
Whether dealing with vision, strategies or tactic
think customer!
Remember that a major difference between
companies is how they treat their customers.
Value to Customer!
IS and Business Strategy
Strategies should be kept simple when possible.
The goal is for Information Systems is to help
business strategies succeed.
Information Systems are never a strategy alone.
A Valid Theory of Business
• The first signs of fundamental change rarely
appear among customers. They show up
among non-customers.
• Unexpected failure is as much a warning sign
as unexpected success and must be taken
seriously.
The Three Components of a New Strategy
Vision
Internal
Assessment
External
Assessment
A New Strategy
Figure 7-1
SWOT Analysis
Strengths
Weaknesses
Opportunities
Threats
Suggest
strategies that
should be
tested against
Vision
Goals
Company Values
Financial Status
Cash Position
ROI Position
Societal Demands
Competition
Core Competencies
People Skills
Overall Resources
Strategic Management Process
Environmental Analysis
General Environment
Operating Environment
Competitive Positioning
ies
t
i
t un t s
r
po rea
p
O
Th
Directions for Development
Company
Vision
Company
Strategic
History
Current
Strategy
Stakeholder
Analysis
Chosen
Strategy
Vision &
Strategy
Realized
Strategy
Company Analysis
Structure
s
Values/Culture
Skills
Figure 7-2
Resources
th
ng
re
St
W
s
se
s
ne
k
ea
Reprinted with permission from
The Strategic Management Blueprint
Cambridge, Ma: Blackwell, 1993.
Conclusions




A strategy should often be kept relatively simple.
Success relies on gaining understanding,
acceptance, and support by people within the
company.
The strategy must accomplish its objectives by
providing direct or indirect value to customers.
Information Systems can only be successful if it
supports the right business strategies.
Possible Exam Questions
1. Describe the steps from vision to implementation
and the major challenges to accomplish of each of
them.
2. Provide multiple company examples of a major
business strategy and how information systems
enabled an otherwise impossible implementation
of the strategy.
Chapter 8 & 9 Introduction
Evaluating Business Strategies
and Information Systems
Roles, Roles & Relationships
Concept
Where Are We?

Section I: The Business Environment
Chapters 2 – 5

Section II: The Company Environment
Chapters 6 – 7

Section III: The Use of Information Systems
A Systematic Approach
Vision
Strategy
Tactics
Business Plan
• Competitive Options
• Roles, Roles and Relationships
• Redefine and/or Define
• Telecommunications
as the Delivery Vehicle
• Success Factor Profile
Chapter 8
Evaluating Business
Strategies and the Use of
Information Systems:
Strategic Option Generator
Strategic Option Generator
As the name suggests, this model can be used to
identify multiple options that can be used to focus
the strategies of a company to gain a competitive
advantage through the use of information systems.
In this class it is to be used as an after the fact
evaluation of what actually happened with a
company.
STRATEGIC OPTION GENERATOR
TARGET
SUPPLIER
CUSTOMER
COMPETITOR
THRUST
DIFFERENTIATION
COST
INNOVATION
GROWTH
ALLIANCE
MODE
OFFENSIVE
DEFENSIVE
DIRECTION
USE
PROVIDE
EXECUTION
STRATEGIC
ADVANTAGE
Figure 8-1
Chapter 9
The Roles, Roles and
Relationships Concept
A concept that is very important to our
academic health!
Roles, Roles & Relationships
Concept

Role of Information Systems

Role of Senior Management

The relationship between those that run the
business and those responsible for
managing information systems
Other Key Topics
1. Triggers of Action Model.
2. Technology Transfer Through
Organizational Learning Concept.
3. Information Systems Organization as a
Business within a Business Concept.
4. Outsourcing of IS Management.
Making It Happen!
Competitive
Advantage
Action
Initiators
Crisis
Management
Process
Improvement
Executive
Power
Figure 9-5
Technology Transfer
Through Organizational
Learning
There is a direct correlation between
the successful introduction of a new
information system within an organization
and the learning curve of the primary
users.
A Business
Products/Services
Users
Suppliers
Board of Directors
Competitors
Figure 9-6
Outsourcing
Logical?
Necessary?
Appropriate?
Cost-effective?
What?
With Whom?
Where?
How Long?
Risk?
Conclusions
Chapters 8 and 9 begin the discussion on how to
assess the use of Information Systems in an
organization through the Strategic Option Generator
model, the Roles, Roles & Relationships concept,
phases of management and leadership, and
outsourcing.
THANK YOU!
A Systematic Approach
Vision
Strategy
Tactics
Business Plan
• Competitive Options
• Roles, Roles and Relationships
• Redefine and/or Define
• Telecommunications
as the Delivery Vehicle
• Success Factor Profile
STRATEGIC OPTION GENERATOR
TARGET
SUPPLIER
CUSTOMER
COMPETITOR
THRUST
DIFFERENTIATION
COST
INNOVATION
GROWTH
ALLIANCE
MODE
OFFENSIVE
DEFENSIVE
DIRECTION
USE
PROVIDE
EXECUTION
STRATEGIC
ADVANTAGE
Figure 8-1
Biggest Mistake
Target, thrust and mode are fairly straight-forward
so they don’t tend to cause problems for students.
Direction is a source of problems and confusion since
the name of the element is not self-explanatory.
This element deals with whom the use of IS is
intended.
Federal Express Analysis
Using the Strategic Option Generator
TARGET
SUPPLIER
CUSTOMER
COMPETITOR
THRUST
DIFFERENTIATION
COST
INNOVATION
GROWTH
ALLIANCE
MODE
OFFENSIVE
DEFENSIVE
DIRECTION
USE
PROVIDE
EXECUTION
STRATEGIC
ADVANTAGE
Figure 8-2
UPS Analysis
Using the Strategic Option Generator
TARGET
SUPPLIER
CUSTOMER
COMPETITOR
THRUST
DIFFERENTIATION
COST
INNOVATION
GROWTH
ALLIANCE
MODE
OFFENSIVE
DEFENSIVE
DIRECTION
USE
PROVIDE
EXECUTION
STRATEGIC
ADVANTAGE
Figure 8-3

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