Session 6 PPT_Final

Report
Rethinking Equity of
Teaching English Language
Learners (RETELL)
Session 6: Vocabulary for
ELLs I
Face-to-Face Session
Session Introduction
SEI Teacher Endorsement Course Map
MODULE A: ELLs: Their World and Second Language Acquisition Process in the SEI
Classroom
(Sessions 1—4)
1: Examining Data &
Policies Relevant to
ELLs
2: Diversity
within ELL
Populations
(ONLINE 3
HOURS)
3: Cultural & Social
Aspects of Teaching
in the SEI Classroom
4. Second
Language
Acquisition in the
SEI Classroom
MODULE B: Academic Language and Literacy Development in the SEI Classroom
(Sessions 5—16)
5. Sheltering Content
(ONLINE 3 HOURS)
6: Vocabulary for ELLs I
7: Vocabulary for ELLs II
8. Vocabulary for ELLs III
(ONLINE 2 HOURS)
9: Reading for ELLs I
10: Reading for ELLs II
11: Reading for ELLs III
(ONLINE 2 HOURS)
12: Writing for ELLs I
13: Writing for ELLs II
14. Writing for ELLs III
(ONLINE 2 HOURS)
15. Large-Scale Assessment for ELLs;
Capstone Lesson Presentations
16. Capstone Lesson Presentations;
Course Evaluation
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
3
Agenda
 Session Introduction (25 min)
 Vocabulary Development for ELLs: Theory and Data (15
min)
 Vocabulary Development for ELLs: Standards and
Frameworks (10 min)
 Teaching Vocabulary to ELLs: Core Practices (30 min)
 Break (10 min)
 Core Practices - Continued (1 hr. 15 min.)
 Small Group Feedback: Connecting Practice and Theory (5
min)
 Final Reflection (5 min)
 Assignments & Preparing for Upcoming Session (5 min)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
4
Objectives
 Explain the relationship of vocabulary to






Language subsystems
The four language domains
Essential shifts relating to literacy and the Common Core standards
WIDA’s Functional Components of Academic Language
Oracy
Sheltered educational theory and practice.
 Explain the importance of vocabulary as a predictor of
success for all students.
 Explain considerations and implications for ELLs related to
vocabulary (limited exposure, depth and breadth,
cognates/false cognates, having/developing a concept for a5
word, difficulty hearing a word, idiomatic expressions,
figures of speech)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Objectives
 Identify key vocabulary words/phrases in a student text and
appropriately assign words/phrases to one of three
vocabulary tiers for ELLs.
 Pre-teach new vocabulary words in an SEI class using an
instructional protocol which distinguishes among the
three tiers of vocabulary.
 Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of oral
language development as a foundation for literacy
development.
 Apply interactive strategies practiced in class activities
to increase engagement in the sheltered content classroom6
and to promote oral language development using
targeted vocabulary.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Connections to Prior Session
 Review language objectives – Let’s make one for today’s
session
 Take out your journal entry completed for today’s
session
 Pair-up with a same grade-level or same-content
teacher
 Use the following guiding questions.
o Where does your lesson align with the SEI template?
o Where does your lesson differ from the SEI template?
7
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Quick Review of Final Course
Capstone Assignment
SEI Endorsement Lesson Plan Template
Capstone Project
o 4 Lessons
o Presentation in Session 16
8
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Vocabulary Development for
ELLs: Theory and Data
What We Know – 100 Years of
Vocabulary Research
 Vocabulary knowledge is one of the best predictors of oral ability
 Vocabulary knowledge contributes to young children’s
phonological awareness, which in turn contributes to their word
recognition
 Vocabulary knowledge in Kindergarten and 1st grade is a
significant predictor of reading comprehension in the middle and
secondary grades
 Vocabulary difficulty strongly influences the readability of text
 Teaching vocabulary can improve reading comprehension.
 Growing up in poverty can seriously restrict the vocabulary
children learn before beginning school and make attaining an
adequate vocabulary a challenging task
 Lack of vocabulary can be a crucial factor underlying the school
failure of disadvantaged students
Source: Graves, M. , 2013
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Vocabulary Development for
ELLs: Is It the Same?
Much of what we have learned about
vocabulary development from the research
base and teaching, for native English
speakers, also applies to ELLs; however there
are some different considerations and
instructional approaches for ELLs that are
different and critical to their academic success.
11
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
A Closer Look: Differences or
Considerations for ELLs
 Take a few minutes to review the handout
Comparison of English Speakers and English
Learner Vocabulary Development with a neighbor.
 For the first column point about Native English
Speakers, please think about and predict some
implications or considerations for ELLs with a
partner.
NATIVE ENGLISH
SPEAKERS
ENGLISH LEARNERS
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Language Subsystems
PRAGMATICS & DISCOURSE: Sociolinguistic rules governing
language use in communicative context
SEMANTICS:
linguistic meanings of words
and sentences
PHONOLOGY:
the sound system
of a language
MORPHOLOGY:
rules of word
formation
SYNTAX &
GRAMMAR:
rules of word
order in
sentence
formation
Adapted from Peregoy & Boyle, 2008
Relationship Between Written & Oral
Language
PRODUCTIVE LANGUAGE USE
SPEAKING
WRITING
DYNAMIC RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN
ORAL &
WRITTEN LANGUAGE
READING
LISTENING
RECEPTIVE LANGUAGE USE
Adapted from Peregoy & Boyle, 2008
Relationship of Oracy to Literacy
Instruction in the key components of reading
is necessary – but not sufficient-for teaching
language – minority students to read and write
proficiently in English. Oral proficiency in
English is critical as well – but student
performance suggests that it is often
overlooked in instruction.
15
National Reading Panel, 2000; August and Shanahan, 2006
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Relationship of Oracy to Literacy
 Oracy is the listening comprehension and oral
production of language.
 Oracy skills lay the groundwork for the emergence
of reading and writing.
 Students with strong oracy levels in English are
more likely to develop strong literacy levels in
English.
 ELLs have acquired their listening comprehension
in their first language; however those sounds and
words are not the same as in English.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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What Is Vocabulary?
 Single Words
o Elephant, peace, walking
 Set Phrases
o All of a sudden
 Variable Phrases
o Off and on, on and off
 Phrasal Verbs
o Put away, put up with, put down, put off
 Polysemous Words
 Plot, table, point
 Idioms
o Got up on the wrong side of the bed
Sources: Vocabulary Myths (Folse, Ken: 2004)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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What Is Vocabulary?
Vocabulary is the knowledge of words and
word meanings in both oral and print language
and in both productive and receptive forms.
(Pacific Resources for Education & Learning)
“…vocabulary is the glue that holds stories,
ideas, and content together…making
comprehension accessible for children.”
(Rupley, Logan & Nichols 1998/1999)
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How would you add to these definitions?
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Discourse
Amount of speech/written text
Structure of speech/written text
Density of speech/written text
Organization and cohesion of ideas (thinking)
Variety of sentence types
Sentence
Types and variety of grammatical structures
Conventions, mechanics, and fluency
Match of language forms to purpose/
perspective
Word/Phrase
Source: Zwiers, J. , 2012
Sociocultural Contexts
WIDA Features of Academic Language
General, specific, and technical language
Multiple meanings of words and phrases
Formulaic and idiomatic expressions; collocations
Nuances and shades of meaning
Vocabulary Relating to WIDA’s Academic
Language
WIDA Consortium
What Does It Mean to Know
Vocabulary?
A Student
knows a word’s meaning when reading it in a
variety of texts;
can pronounce and spell the word correctly;
recognizes characteristics of the word, such as
multiple meanings;
can explain its meaning within the context of
reading;
can use it as a natural part of his or her
writing repertoire.
Source: Calderon, M. 2011
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Role of Vocabulary in Student
Success
 Having a substantial vocabulary is crucial to
learning to read and write.
 Comprehension depends on knowing between 90%
and 95% of the words in text.
 Reading comprehension correlates with procedural
and content knowledge.
 Content knowledge correlates with academic
success.
 Teachers need to provide powerful explicit vocabulary
instruction and a rich array of language experiences in
listening, speaking, reading, and writing .
Source: Graves, August, Carlo, Calderon)Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Vocabulary Development for
ELLs: Standards and
Frameworks
Common Core: Key Shifts
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS/LITERACY
1) Balance of literature and informational texts;
focus on text complexity
2) Emphasis on argument, informative/explanatory
writing, and research
Write about sources (evidence)
Answer questions that require students to have read text
3) Speaking and listening skills
Inclusion of formal and informal talk
4) Literacy standards for history, science and technical subjects. Literacy
is not just the job of the English teacher; complements rather than
replaces those subjects
ANCHORED IN COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS
Source: Adapted from MA DESE Slide
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Common Core: Implications for
Vocabulary Instruction for ELLs
 A central purpose of the standards is to raise educational
rigor through more canonical, complex, and informational
text. This means texts with more challenging vocabulary –
vocabulary that will require SIGNIFICANT scaffolding for
ELLs.
 Vocabulary is prominently featured, at all grade levels,
in all domains, and in the Language Arts, as well as in the
disciplinary literacy standards for history/social studies,
science and technology.
 All students have the opportunity to learn and reach these
high standards and need to be supported, though
regarding ELLs the standards state explicitly that it is
“beyond the scope of the Standards to define the full
range of supports appropriate for ELLs…”
(Graves, August, Mancilla-Martinez, 2013)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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WIDA and Common Core
Together
 Massachusetts has adopted WIDA’s English Language
Development Standards that help teachers to address the
range of instructional needs and proficiency levels of ELLs.
 They are intended to be used in tandem with the Common
Core State Standards and all Massachusetts Curriculum
Frameworks and therefore in all classrooms with ELLs.
 These standards show teachers how to scaffold language
inherent in teaching to Common Core and other standards
and for different communication tasks students engage in
during content instruction.
26
 The ELD Standards, like Common Core, acknowledge the
central role of language in the instructional and assessment
needs of ELLs.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Frameworks: Instructional
Implications
 Teachers must know how to use both sets of
standards when they have English learners in their
classrooms.
 WIDA’s framework is a formative assessment
framework and therefore encourages excellent
formative assessment in instructional decisionmaking for ELLs, day to day, in an ongoing way,
supported by in-depth teacher knowledge about
the backgrounds of their English learners.
 All teachers are teachers of language and literacy
and own responsibility for teaching it in their
content area.
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 All teachers are ELL teachers.
Teaching Vocabulary
to ELLs: Necessary
Elements
Effective Vocabulary Instruction
for ELLs
 ELLs should be given ample opportunities and
encouraged to communicate with Englishproficient speakers for it is in this way the
second languages are predominantly acquired.
(Ellis, 2005)
 Several strategies are especially valuable for
ELLs, including taking advantage of students’ first
language if the language shares cognates with
English; ensuring that ELLs know the meaning of
basic words, and providing sufficient review and
reinforcement. (August, Carlo, Dressler, Snow,
2005)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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A 4-Prong Approach
1. Providing rich and varied language
experiences for ELLs
ELLs learn words through reading, writing,
listening, and speaking.
In K and primary grades and for ELLs in early
proficiency stages, listening and speaking are
particularly important to vocabulary development.
Source: Graves, 2013; Baumann and Kame’ enui, 2012; Blachowicz, Fisher Ogle and Watts-Taffe, 2006;
Stahl and Nagy 2006; August and Snow, 2008, Baumann, Blachowixz, Graves & Oleynik, 2009
31
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
4-Prong Approach
2. Teaching individual words
We can’t teach them ALL!
Most effective when ELLs are given both
definitional and contextual information and when
learners actively process new word meanings and
have multiple exposures to the new words
Rich, deep and extended in other words!
Source: Graves, 2013; Baumann and Kame’ enui, 2012; Blachowicz, Fisher Ogle and Watts-Taffe,
2006; Stahl and Nagy 2006; August and Snow, 2008, Baumann, Blachowixz, Graves & Oleynik, 2009
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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4-Prong Approach
3. Teaching word-learning strategies
Using word parts (prefixes, suffixes, roots) to
unlock meaning of words (Baumann, Font, Edwards
and Boland, 2005; Carlyle, 2007) and understand
families of words
indicate-indicator-indicated-indication
Using context to infer word meanings
Using the dictionary and similar reference tools
(Graves, 2006; Stahl & Nagy, 2006)
Using cognate knowledge
Source: Graves, 2013; Baumann and Kame’ enui, 2012; Blachowicz, Fisher Ogle and WattsTaffe, 2006; Stahl and Nagy 2006; August and Snow, 2008, Baumann, Blachowixz, Graves &
Oleynik, 2009
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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4-Prong Approach
4. Fostering Word Consciousness
Word consciousness involves both a
cognitive and an affective stance toward
words and integrates metacognition about
words, motivation to learn words, and a
deep and lasting interest in words (Graves
& Watts-Taffe, 2008; Scott, Skobel & Wells,
2008)
(Graves, 2013; Baumann and Kame’ enui, 2012;
Blachowicz, Fisher Ogle and Watts-Taffe, 2006; Stahl and
Nagy 2006; August and Snow, 2008, Baumann,
Blachowixz, Graves & Oleynik, 2009)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Strategies for
Teaching Vocabulary
to ELLs
Approach to Strategies and
Practices in the Course
 Model
o The facilitator will demonstrate the core practice or strategy.
 Practice
o Participants will practice the approach or strategy in class.
o Participants will implement the strategy in their classroom as
an assignment.
 Feedback
o The facilitator and peer participants will give feedback to
colleagues as they practice in class.
o Participants will have an opportunity to debrief with other
participants in their content or grade level and seek feedback
on their experience after implementing in the classroom.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Identifying Words to Teach: Tier 1
Vocabulary
First Tier words rarely require much instructional
attention.
o They are used frequently in oral discourse.
o They consist of basic words.
o They can be easily demonstrated through visuals, motions
and gestures.
o Examples are: baby, clock, happy, walk, jump, hop, slide,
girl, boy, dog
Is this true for English language learners? What
factors do teachers of ELLs have to consider?
Source: Beck, I. et al, 2002; Calderon, M. 2011
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Identifying Words to Teach: Tier 2
 Complex words and longer phrases (Bookishness) (All of a sudden)
 Polysemous words (multiple meaning words) (plot /plot)
 Idioms (“kicked the bucket” )
 Noun Phrases (long time, great Depression)
 Prepositional phrases (on the verge)
 Connectors and transition words (as a result…)
 Specific and sophisticated words that cross multiple content areas
(analysis)
 Students often have some conceptual understanding on which to build
word knowledge (e.g. they may not know the words “sophisticated or 38
elegant” but they know the concept and word “pretty”).
Source: Calderon, M. 2011
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Identifying Words to Teach: Tier 3
This category consists of words whose
frequency of use is quite low and often
limited to specific domains.
o Examples are: isotope, lathe, peninsula, refinery.
o These words are best learned when a specific need
arises such as a geography lesson – i.e., words
used infrequently and unknown concepts.
o These words are very important to understanding
content.
(Beck,I. et al, 2002; Calderon, M. 2011)
Which of these do you spend the most of the time
teaching – Tier 1, Tier 2, or Tier 3?
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
39
The Three Tiers – Examples
Tier 1
Tier 2
Tier 3
Description
Concrete
words/phrases
that can be
demonstrated
easily.
Information processing
words, polysemous words,
transition words, connectors;
more sophisticated words for
rich discussions and
specificity in descriptions,
word phrases, idioms
Uncommon
words that are
typically
associated with
a specific
domain
Examples
clock
cold
happy
friendly
locker
schedule
choice
avoid,
entomologist
adapt
peninsula
consequently
bucolic
trunk
endoplasmic
40
point
reticulum
once upon a time
break a leg
asMassachusetts
well as Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Identifying Tiers of Vocabulary in
Text : The Rancid Rafflesia
1. Read aloud the first section of The Rancid Rafflesia.
2. Analyze the vocabulary for the 3 tiers.
Tier 1
Tier 2
Tier 3
smells
rancid
carrion
41
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Identifying Tiers of Vocabulary in
Text: The Rancid Rafflesia
Tier 1
Tier 2
Tier 3
smell
flower
cabbage
world
food
dog
wide
largest
days
rancid
corpse
root
stench
miniature
blossom
pound
yard
expands
in full bloom
parasite
pollination
chlorophyll
carrion
42
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Small Group Activity: Identifying
Tiers of Vocabulary in Text
1 Break into small groups with assigned reading segment.
2. Analyze the vocabulary for the 3 tiers.
3. Record on chart paper and post.
Tier 1
Tier 2
Tier 3
43
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
So Much Vocabulary!
CABBAGE
44
miniature
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Break (10 minutes)
 If you are waiting, or back
early, quickly scan pages
handouts in the Participant
Manual
 Make a one-sentence oral
connection between the
three Tiers and your
classroom/instruction.
45
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Teaching Vocabulary to ELLs:
Core Practices (cont.)
Criteria for Choosing Vocabulary
to Teach to ELLs
 The following are some factors to consider when selecting WHICH
words to teach, when you have ELLs in the classroom:
o Importance and Utility: Characteristic of mature language
users and are found in a wide variety of contexts (Is this word
important to know for understanding the text? For conversation?)
o Instructional Potential: Students can build rich
representations of them and can easily connect to other
words/concepts. (Can you work with this word?)
o Conceptual Understanding: Students understand the general
concept but provide precision and specificity (Can you make a
connection to students’ learning, background, language ?)
47
Source: Beck et. al. 2002, Bringing Words to Life
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Choosing Vocabulary: The Rancid
Rafflesia
Tier 1
Tier 2
Tier 3
smell
flower
cabbage
world
food
dog
wide
largest
days
rancid
corpse
root
stench
miniature
blossom
pound
yard
expands
parasite
pollination
chlorophyll
carrion
48
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Choosing Vocabulary to Teach
1. Return to your chart and group from before (3 groups
with assigned reading segments).
2. Discuss the vocabulary based on the criteria for
selecting words to teach.
3. Decide which you are going to teach specifically with
ELLs in mind.
Tier 1
Tier 2
Tier 3
49
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Gallery Walk
 Visit each chart.
 Check the 3 tiers – how did each group do?
 On a sticky note write 1 question and 1 for the other
group.
 Return to your own chart and review the questions
and comments. Would you change any of your words
to other tiers?
Are there any considerations for ELLs you had not
thought of with the words you selected?
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
50
Fostering Word Consciousness in
our ELLs
 Set up glossaries in students notebooks (the end). Have
students note new words worth learning from their texts
each day for a few minutes. Discuss.
 Ask students to preview and select vocabulary from text
that they think will be difficult to understand or useful to
the chapter. Have students track and post these words each
day.
 As students get more adept at picking the right words, use
them as the focus of your vocabulary language objectives
each day.
 Have students contribute to making content word walls
where you categorize Tier 1, 2, and 3 vocabulary.
 Have students use sticky-notes to mark vocabulary as they
read, notably words or word phrases that they have seen
frequently, and know they should know, but don’t.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
51
A 7-Step Process for Pre-Teaching
Vocabulary (Before Reading)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Teacher says the word. Student repeats.
Teacher states the word in context from the text.
Teacher provides the dictionary definition(s).
Teacher explains meaning with student-friendly
definitions.
5. Teacher highlights features of the word:
polysemous, cognate, tense, prefixes, etc.
6. Teacher engages students in activities to develop
word/concept knowledge.
7. Teacher assigns peer reading with oral and
written summarization activities and explains
how new words will be used.

(Calderon, M., 2011)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
52
A 7-Step Process for Pre-Teaching
Vocabulary (Before Reading) :
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Teacher says the word. Student
repeats.
Teacher states the word in context
from the text.
Teacher provides the dictionary
definition(s).
Teacher explains meaning with
student-friendly definitions.
Teacher highlights features of the
word: polysemous, cognate, tense,
prefixes, etc.
Teacher engages students in
activities to develop word/concept
knowledge.
Teacher assigns peer reading with
oral and written summarization
activities and explains how new
Margarita
Calderón
&
words
will
be used.
Associates, Inc.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Say stench 3 times.
Flowering for just four to six days,
it fills the air with a stench like
carrion…
A strong and very unpleasant
smell.
A very stinky smell-Sneakers that
have been worn a lot often have a
terrible stench.
Stench is a non-count noun. You
would never say “stenches.”
1 Minute Brainstorm : With a
partner, use the expression: “I’ll
tell you what has a stench… ___
has a stench!”
Use words in your brainstorm and
“stench” to write a sentence.
A 7-Step Process for Pre-Teaching
Vocabulary (Before Reading) :
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Teacher says the word. Student
repeats.
Teacher states the word in context
from the text.
Teacher provides the dictionary
definition(s).
Teacher explains meaning with
student-friendly definitions.
Teacher highlights features of the
word: polysemous, cognate, tense,
prefixes, etc.
Teacher engages students in
activities to develop word/concept
knowledge.
Teacher assigns peer reading with
oral and written summarization
Margarita Calderón
&
activities
and explains
how new
Associates, Inc.
words
will be used.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Repeat after me …Say
____________ 3 times.
Instructions
Individually decide on a key term to pre-teach
from your chart.
Complete the chart and practice teaching your
seven steps. For step 6 use TTYP.
Teach your Partner or Triad (Role playing the
part of the students).
55
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Feedback and Exemplars
At your table take 2 minutes to discuss what
was easiest and what was most challenging
about this strategy. Why?
Did anyone do a GREAT job first time trying
this process? Nominate your partner!
56
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Small Group Feedback:
Connecting Practice and
Theory
Expanding the Strategy
 There are many ways to create quick interaction
between students and with new words-step 6!
Let’s explore some of these with colleagues.
 4-Corners
 Choose a corner for which you can contribute to a
brainstorm.
 Brainstorm with your colleagues for 3 minutes and
report out. Discuss examples as you brainstorm.
 Post on your chart.
 This will help inform ideas for your strategy try-out !
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
58
The 4 Corner Brainstorm
 Corner 1 – Brainstorm quick Interactive strategies for vocabulary
development DURING reading or class discussion.
o Think-Pair-Share-Square
 Corner 2 – Look at WIDA’s “supports” – these are strategies built
right into the framework, appropriate for ELLs at different levels!
o Discuss which ones you use often with the group and pick some you believe you
SHOULD plan to use more often. Give an example from your classroom where you
might employ those supports for vocabulary development.
 Corner 3 – Quick kinesthetic strategies and visual/graphic strategies
for showing word meaning
o Show how….(e.g. Show how to walk lugubriously…).
o Draw the word.
 Corner 4 – Students taking charge!
o In the Participant Manual examine the different ideas for students to mark up and
select their own vocabulary DURING and AFTER reading.
o Can your group add one or two other examples?
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
59
Final Reflections
Exit Slip
 Collaborative Circle-Square-Triangle at tables
 Reflect on the concepts, research, and strategies
discussed and practiced today.
 Collectively come to consensus about the
following
o Circle – Are there any questions circling in your head?
o Square – What squares with your academic knowledge
from today?
o Triangle – What are 3 most important points from today
that will inform instructional practice with ELLs?
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
61
Assignments
& Preparing for Upcoming
Session
Assignments for Session 7
 Strategy Implementation
In your classroom, implement a vocabulary strategy
modeled and practiced in this Endorsement course
session at least once before the next session
 Lesson plan on Vocabulary Development
Using designated components of the Endorsement
Lesson Plan Template, plan a mini-lesson for English
learners on academic vocabulary development.
63
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Assignment for Session 8
 Professional Learning Network Participation
Identify two other teachers in the course who teach in
your school or district. Schedule a 45-minute meeting
to take place sometime before Session 8.
At the conclusion of the meeting, the three participants
should complete the Professional Learning Network
Meeting Summary.
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Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
What to bring next time
Required Readings for Session 7
o Donnelly, W. S. and C. J. Roe. 2010. Using sentence frames to
develop academic vocabulary for ELLs. Reading Teacher, 64 (2):
131–136.
o Kinsella, K. 2005. Teaching academic vocabulary. In Aiming High
RESOURCE: Aspirando a lo Mejor. Santa Rosa, CA: Sonoma County
Office of Education. Retrieved from
http://www.scoe.org/docs/ah/AH_kinsella2.pdf.
In addition please bring:
 Your own texts and text-based resources (e.g., text book
examples, novels, teachers guide);
 Hard copies of your completed assignments to share in
next session
65
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

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