lesson-study

Report
Introduction to Lesson Study
This material is based upon work supported by the National
Science Foundation under Grant No. 0207259
Traveler, there is no road.
The road is created as we
walk it together.
Antonio Machado
Professional Development
TRADITIONAL
RESEARCH LESSONS
• Begins with answer
• Begins with question
• Driven by expert
• Driven by participants
• Communication
trainer -> teachers
• Communication among
teachers
• Relationships hierarchical
• Relationship reciprocal
• Research informs practice
• Practice is research
By Lynn Liptak, Paterson School #2, New Jersey.
Teachers’ Activities to Improve
Instruction
Choose curriculum,
write curriculum,
align curriculum,
write local standards
Plan lessons individually
Plan lessons collaboratively
Watch and discuss each other’s
classroom lessons
U.S.
JAPAN
What is a Research Lesson?
1. Actual classroom lesson with students,
watched by other teachers
2. Planned collaboratively
3. Brings to life a goal or vision of education
4. Recorded: video, audio, hand written, and
through student work
5. Discussed by faculty and sometimes
outside commentators
Figure 1
Lesson Study
Planning
Phase
Discuss Long Term Goals
for Students’ Academic,
Social and Ethical
Development
Choose Content Area and Unit
Discuss Learning Goals for
Content Area, Unit and Lesson
Plan Lessons(s) that Foster
Long-Term Goals and
Lesson/Unit Goals
Research
Lesson
RESEARCH
LESSON
Actual classroom
lesson; attending
teachers study
student thinking,
learning,
engagement,
behavior, etc.
Post-Lesson
Activities
Discussion of Lesson
Discuss research lesson.
Focus on evidence of
whether the lesson
promoted the long-term
goals and lesson/unit goals
Consolidate Learning
Write report that includes
lesson plan, data, and
summary of discussion.
Refine and re-teach the
lesson if desired. Or select a
new focus of study.
Lesson Study Provides Opportunities to
1. Think Deeply About Long-term Goals for Students
2. Carefully Consider the Goals of a Particular Content
Area, Unit, and Lesson
3. Study the Best Available Lessons
4. Plan Lessons that Bring to Life both Short-term and
Long-term goals
5. Deepen Subject Matter Knowledge
6. Develop Instructional Knowledge
7. Build Capacity for Collegial Learning
8. Develop the “Eyes to See Students”
Data Collected During Lesson Study
Academic Learning
• How did images of heated air change?
• Did students shift from simple counting to more flexible method?
• Did dramatic role-play spark higher quality and quantity of writing?
• In their journals, what did students write as their learnings?
Motivation
• Percent of children who raised hands
• Body language, “aha” comments, shining eyes
Social Behavior
• How many times do students refer to and build on classmates’
comments?
• How often do the five quietist students speak up?
• Are students friendly and respectful?
Student Attitudes Toward Lesson
• What did you like and dislike about the lesson?
Lesson Study
Planning
Phase
• Collaborative planning
• Discuss goals for students & content
• Study available units & lessons
• Build from an existing lesson
Lesson Study
Planning
Phase
Research
Lesson
• 1 teacher teaches; others observe/ collect data
• Designed to bring to life a particular
goal/ vision of education
• Record lesson - video, audio, student
work, observation notes
Lesson Study
Planning
Phase
Research
Lesson
Post-Lesson
Activities
• Formally debrief lesson
• Share data
• Draw implications for lesson and teachinglearning more broadly
• Revise and re-teach if desired
Lesson Study
1. STUDY
Consider long term goals for
student learning and
development
Study curriculum and
standards
4. REFLECT
Select or revise research
lesson
Share data
What was learned about
students learning, lesson
design, this content?
What are implications for this
lesson and instruction more
broadly?
2. PLAN
Do task
Anticipate student responses
Plan data collection and lesson
3. DO RESEARCH
LESSON
Conduct research lesson
Collect data
How does lesson study improve instruction?
Visible
Features of
Lesson Study
•Consider Goals
•Study Curriculum and
Standards
•Plan and Conduct Research
Lesson
•Collect Data
•Debrief Lesson
•Use Debrief to Inform
Instruction
?
Instructional
Improvement
A Common Early Conception of Lesson Study
Visible
Features of
Lesson Study
 Plan
 Teach
 Observe
 Discuss
 Etc.
Key Pathway
Lesson Plans
Improve
Instructional
Improvement
Current View: How Does Lesson Study Improve Instruction?
Visible
Features of Lesson
Study
•Consider Goals
•Study Curriculum
and Standards
•Plan and Conduct
Research Lesson
•Collect Data
•Debrief Lesson
•Use Debrief to
Inform Instruction
•What Else?
Cause Changes In:
Teachers
Knowledge of subject
matter and its teaching
•General knowledge of
instruction
•Ability to observe
students
•Connection of daily
instruction to long-term
goals
•Motivation/willingness
to improve
•Capacity to learn
together, collegial
networks
Curriculum
•Better lessons
•Choice of better
curricula
System
•Changes in policy
•Changes in learning
structures
Result in Changes in
Teaching-Learning
Specific Examples:
Teaching
-Offer high-level task
Learning
-Student journals reveal
thinking re: proportional
reasoning
Lesson Study in the US:
What Have We learned?
1. U.S. educators Can Find Lesson Study Useful
2. Successful and Unsuccessful Adaptations Occur
3. The Idea of Lesson Study is Simple But the Practice
Is Not
4. Qualities of Successful Sites
 A learning stance
 Teacher leadership
 Hands-on experiences, such as work with Japanese
practitioners

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