E7. Promoting Dual Language Success in a Monolingual Classroom

Report
Tracie Myers, Stacey Flanigan, and Katy Knudtson
Community Child Care Center, St. Paul
1
Walking into a new language…
2
Who We Are

Community Child Care Center
demographics
 36 of 56 children are dual language learners
(home language other than English), additional
children have another language in the home
 17 different languages that are always changing
○ Spanish, Portuguese, Mandarin, Ojibwe, Swahili,
Hebrew, Arabic, Tamil, Korean, Bengali,
Setswana, Hindi, Malayalam, Vietnamese, French,
Catalan, Punjabi
3
Different Programming Styles
Bilingual
 Monolingual (English or another
language)

4
Population of DLLs in Schools

20% of U.S. population over age 5 speak a
language other than English at home (U.S.
Census Bureau, 2010)
 Number has increased 140% in 30 years
Over 50% of U.S. schools serve at least
one DLL (NCES 2009)
 14.1% of public elementary school
students are DLLs (NCES 2009)
 6.5% of public secondary school students
are DLLs (NCES 2009)

5
Population of DLLs in Schools
2005: 29% of Head Start participants do
not speak English as first language
(Cheatham & Ro, 2010)
 150 languages among U.S. DLL students
(Chen & Shire, 2011)
 Predicted that by 2030s, 40% of K-12
students will have limited English
proficiency (Chen & Shire, 2011)
 Only 15% of BA and 13% of AA ECE
teacher prep programs require a course on
working with DLLs (Gillanders, 2007)

6
What happens if we don’t serve
them?
Misassessment resulting in overreferrals for special needs, disabilities
(Brooks & Karathanos, 2009)
 Results in an invisible, isolated
population of children whose identities
are ignored, stereotyped, or deemed in
need of fixing

7
Stages of Second Language
Acquisition
Using home language in classroom
Nonverbal Period
1.
2.


Going public with words/phrases
3.

4.
Child spends time observing
Socially irrelevant (on the sidelines)
Formulaic and Telegraphic Speech
Productive use

Full participant, fluent communicator
8
Individual Differences
Exposure
 Age
 Personality
 Motivation
 Simultaneous or Sequential Acquisition
 Order of stages not set in stone, kids
can skip around, backtrack, etc.

9
Communicating at Play Time

How do kids use language with each
other at play time?
 Negotiate
 Join a game
 Assign roles
 Take turns
 Persuade
10
Byong-Sun
How does this compare to a native
English speaker’s play?
 Socially irrelevant
 Double Bind

 Can’t be social without the language, can’t
learn the language without being social
11
Strategies for ECE Professionals
Developing family-school partnerships
 Designing classroom environment
 Fostering positive teacher-child
relationships
 Supporting positive peer interactions

12
Developing Family-School
Partnerships: Programming
Messages of welcome and support
 Family intakes
 Enrollment forms
 Names
 Policies and philosophies
 Open-door policy
 Sharing information and materials
 Community events

13
Developing Family-School
Partnerships: Teachers


Family intake
Home language plan
 Native language resources


Sharing information (curriculum, materials, etc.)
Get to know families as individuals, not as a
culture
14
Developing Family-School
Partnerships: Teachers
Home visits, conferences
 Goals
 Assessment

 Authentic, dynamic assessment without
language
 Discuss progress vs. results
 Dialogue about language development

Invite families to share language/culture
in any way they are comfortable
15
Developing Family-School
Partnerships: Teachers
Families are your best resource!
They are the experts on their culture and
language, so developing partnerships
will help you and you will feel more
comfortable asking about it
16
Classroom Environment

Consistent schedule and routine
 Circle Time Routines
 Small group vs. Large group
 Photo schedule
Safe havens
 Individualized
communication tools

17
Classroom Environment
How does your family say “hello”?

Represent languages, cultures
 Labels (materials, names)
 Books, Read-along stories
 Music
 Toys/Supplies
 Speak a few key words/phrases
18
19
Teacher-Child Relationship






Get to know the language, culture of child
Try a greeting word in the child’s home
language
Learn to pronounce the child’s name
Interact first without language—parallel
play, smiles, and space
Refer to child without speaking to him/her
directly (included in group, but no pressure
to respond)
Narrate the day with running commentary
20
Teacher-Child Relationship
Start slow, with a few key words in home
language
 Interact with simple phrases supported
with gestures/visual aids
 Repetition
 Start with hear and now
 Expand their communication
 Keep expectations in check

21
Supporting Peer Interactions
Establish class mentors
Invite DLLs to play with you and into play
groups with other children
 Small group instruction vs. large group
 Model and supply language


 Vocabulary words in context
 Repeating in social negotiations
Child-centered activities that encourage
peer interaction
 Intentional child placement
 Safe havens

22
Contact Us

Tracie Myers, Director
[email protected]

Stacey Flanigan, Education Coordinator
[email protected]

Katy Knudtson, Preschool Teacher
[email protected]

Community Child Care Center
www.umncccc.org
23
Refences
Brooks, K. & Karathanos, K. (2009). Building on the cultural and linguistic capital of English
learner (EL) students. Multicultural Education, 16(4), 47-51.
Cheatham, G. A. & Ro, Y. E. (2010). Young English learners’ interlanguage as a context for
language and early literacy development. Young Children, 65(4), 18-23.
Chen, J. J. & Shire, S. H. (2011). Strategic teaching: Fostering communication skills in
diverse learners. Young Children, 66(2), 20-27.
Gillanders, C. (2007). An English-speaking prekindergarten teacher for young Latino
children: Implications of the teacher-child relationship on second language learning.
Early Childhood Education Journal, 35(1), 47-54.
National Center for Education Statistics. (2009). Characteristics of public, private, and
Bureau of Indian Education elementary and secondary schools in the United
States:Results from the 2007–08 Schools and Staffing Survey (NCES 2009-321).
Retrieved from
http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2009/2009321/tables/sass0708_2009321_s12n_02.asp
Nemeth, K. N. (2012). Basics of supporting dual language learners: An introduction for
educators of children from birth to age 8. Washington, D.C.: NAEYC.
Tabors, P. O. (2008). One child, two languages: A guide for early childhood educators of
children learning English as a second language. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing
Company.
U.S. Census Bureau. (2010). New Census Bureau report analyzes nation's linguistic
diversity: Population speaking a language other than English at home increases by 140
percent in past three decades (CB10-CN.58). Retrieved from
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/c
b10-cn58.html
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