Jeffrey Lantz PP

Report
U.S. Coast Guard Regulations
“Making a difference”
Jeff Lantz
Director, Commercial Regulations & Standards
U.S. Coast Guard
United States Coast Guard
Marine Safety, Security, and Stewardship
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Why Regulate?
• When required by law, to interpret the law, or
to address “compelling public need”
(Executive Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Review)
– Ensure activities of industry in keeping with
broader societal objectives: safety, security,
environmental protection
– Provide enforceable policies for field
– Provide reasoned, consistent, predictable policies
for industry
United States Coast Guard
Marine Safety, Security, and Stewardship
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USCG Regulatory Approach
• Address risk in cost-effective
manner
• Consider economic impacts, with
particular attention to small
business impacts
• Build international approaches
where possible
• Utilize industry consensus
standards
• Integrate regulations with policies
to ensure reasoned, consistent
enforcement
Additional
Requirements
Consensus Standards
International Standards
Industry Voluntary Measures
United States Coast Guard
Marine Safety, Security, and Stewardship
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LNG as Fuel - Interest in the U.S.
TOTE
RO/RO Container Ship
LNG Retrofit
United States Coast Guard
Marine Safety, Security, and Stewardship
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Gaps in Existing Regulations
The Current Regulations Do Not address:
• Design and construction of LNG fuel systems.
• Operations, training, and general safety for personnel on
vessels where LNG fuel systems are installed.
• LNG transfer operations (Current procedures viewed in light
of oil transfers).
• Small scale LNG (e.g. bunkering) operations conducted from
vessels and shoreside facilities (Currently viewed in context of
large scale cargo transfer).
• Barges transporting LNG in bulk.
United States Coast Guard
Marine Safety, Security, and Stewardship
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U.S. Coast Guard Policy Letters
Short Term Solution to Bridge Gaps:
• Develop policy letters to address gaps in
regulations until regulations can be
developed.
–
Natural gas fuel systems on vessels
• Base policy letters on existing regulations
applicable to LNG cargo operations scaling
down to fit needs and accomplish safety
mission.
• Ensure alignment with ongoing work of
leading international organizations (e.g. IMO
and ISO).
United States Coast Guard
Marine Safety, Security, and Stewardship
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U.S. Code of Federal Regulations
Long Term Solution to Close Gaps
•
Initiate rulemaking project.
– Notice of Proposed Rulemaking
– Final Rule
• Use implemented policy to identify
any additional areas to be addressed
in regulation.
CFR
• Incorporate standards and guidance
developed by the international
community and LNG industry where
appropriate.
United States Coast Guard
Marine Safety, Security, and Stewardship
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U.S. Coast Guard LNG Industry Association
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Standards Development
IMO - International Code of Safety for Ships Using Gases or Other Low-Flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code)
IMO - International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk
(IGC Code)
ISO - International Guidelines for Bunkering LNG as a Marine Fuel (TC67 WG10)
NFPA 52 - Vehicular Gaseous Fuel Systems Code (updates to Chapter on Marine Vessels)
NFPA 59A - Production, Storage, and Handling of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)
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Advisory Committees / Interagency & Industry Workgroups
CGHQ Internal Natural Gas Workgroup
Federal LNG Interagency Roundtable (Washington, DC)
CTAC Subcommittee on LNG/CNG as Cargo and Use as Fuel (Federal Advisory Committee)
SIGTTO – LNG Fuel Safety Advisory Group (London, UK)
LNG Fuel Advisory Council (chaired by DNV, Houston)
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Other Industry Contacts
Great Lakes Maritime Research Institute
Center for LNG
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United States Coast Guard
Marine Safety, Security, and Stewardship
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Thank you – Questions?
Additional
Requirements
Consensus Standards
International Standards
Industry Voluntary Measures
United States Coast Guard
Marine Safety, Security, and Stewardship
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