Chicago Jobs Council - Supportive Housing Providers Association

Report
Introduction to the Workforce
Development System
Developed by the Chicago Jobs Council
Delivered by the Supportive Housing
Providers Association
Chicago Jobs Council
Agenda
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Introductions
What is the Workforce Development System?
Program Models / Services for Job Seekers
Funding Sources
Challenges and Opportunities
Chicago Jobs Council
What is the Workforce
Development System?
Chicago Jobs Council
What is the Workforce
Development System?
• Assists disadvantaged individuals prepare
for, find, and remain engaged in
employment
• Network of community-based organizations,
training providers, and other institutions
• Funded by a variety of sources
Chicago Jobs Council
Workforce Development:
Intersections with Other Systems
• Community Colleges
• Adult Education (Literacy, ESL, GED prep)
• Economic Development
• Human Services
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Who does the Workforce
Development system serve?
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Youth (in-school and out-of-school)
People with criminal records
Public housing residents
Veterans
Homeless individuals
TANF recipients
Unemployment Insurance recipients
Individuals with limited English proficiency
Low-wage incumbent workers
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Program Models / Services
for Job Seekers
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Transitional Jobs (TJ) Programs
• Aimed at individuals with limited labor market
experience (i.e. ex-offenders, public housing
residents, older youth)
• Time-limited, wage paying (subsidized)
employment
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Real work experience
Extensive support services and case management
Job readiness/ soft skills
Assistance transitioning to unsubsidized employment
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Transitional Jobs (TJ) Programs
• Types of TJ Program Models
– Individual placement
– Work crews
– Social enterprise
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“Bridge” Educational Strategies
• Goal: increase education levels of individuals so
they can succeed in post-secondary education
and/or career path employment
• Remedial instruction beginning at low literacy /
numeracy levels, contextualized to an occupation
• No dedicated funding stream or program- Adult Basic
Education, WIA Title I, Community Development Block Grant,
private funding braiding of several funding sources
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“Bridge” Educational Strategies
• Definition adopted by Illinois Community College
Board (ICCB) and Illinois Department of Commerce &
Economic Opportunity (DCEO)
• 3 main “bridge” program components
• Components are mandatory; without one it’s not a
“bridge” program
Chicago Jobs Council
Illinois Definition of Bridge
Program: 3 Core Elements
• Contextualized instruction that integrates basic reading,
math, and language skills with occupational knowledge
• Career Development that includes career exploration,
career planning, and understanding of the world of work.
• Transition Services that provide students with the
information and assistance they need to successfully
navigate the process of moving from adult education to
credit or occupational programs.
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Bridge programs in the field
• Successful bridge programs can be offered by a range
of entities
– Community based organizations
– Community colleges
– Partnerships between CBOs and community
colleges
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Sector-based Training
• Training developed in conjunction with an
employer to ensure it meets industry standards
• Designed to prepare participants for particular
occupations within a high demand industry
• Chicago has focused on manufacturing, IT,
healthcare, and hospitality (among others)
Chicago Jobs Council
Employment Prep & Placement
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Basic workplace skills
Communication and problem solving skills
Resume and cover letter writing
Interviewing skills
Basic computer skills
Job search and placement assistance
Potential referral to sector training program
Follow up services to ensure employment
retention
Chicago Jobs Council
Adult Basic Education (ABE)
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Provides basic education services to adults
English as a Second Language
Literacy
GED preparation
Contextualized ABE a part of bridge programs
Recently there has been increased conversation
about enhancing linkage between these services
and workforce development
Chicago Jobs Council
Support Services
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State ID
Obtain criminal record
GED registration fee
Licensing fee / exams
Glasses
Books / materials for
training
• Referrals to other social
services
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Transportation
Child care
Dependent care
Housing
Access to voicemail
Clothing / uniforms
Legal assistance
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Workforce Development
Funding Sources
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Workforce Investment Act
(WIA) Title I
U.S. Department of Labor
Employment & Training
Administration
Illinois Dept. of
Commerce & Economic
Opportunity
Local WIA
Administrator
Chicago Jobs Council
Workforce Investment Act
(WIA) Title I
• Dual customer: job seeker and employer
• Serves low-income adults, low-income youth,
& dislocated workers
• Performance outcomes: job placement, job
retention, wages, attainment of
degree/certificate, literacy & numeracy gains
Chicago Jobs Council
Eligibility and Suitability
• Adult: 18 years and older; low-income (very)
• Dislocated Worker: unemployed and unlikely to return
to occupation; received a layoff notice or have been
laid off due to a company closure or mass layoff; self
employed but currently unemployed
• Youth: 16-21 years; low-income; barrier(s) to
employment
• Suitability: May be referred to appropriate educational
entity, bridge program, other workforce development
program, or social service agency upon assessment
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Types of WIA Services
• Universal: general orientation, eligibility assessment,
job search activities, basic workshops, labor market
information
• Intensive: job readiness skills, comprehensive
assessment, individual employment plan, workshops
on interviewing, resumes, job search
• Training: industry-specific occupational training,
Individual Training Accounts (ITAs)
• Must be suitable and eligible for WIA program to
access intensive and training services.
Chicago Jobs Council
WIA
Network
http://www.ildceo.net/dceo/bureaus/workforce_developm
ent/warn/warn_lwia+regions.htm
Temporary Assistance for
Needy Families (TANF)
• Uses related to workforce development
– Source of flexible funding for training and job placement
services (both TANF recipients and non-recipients)
– Pipeline into employment & training services for lowincome parents
• Access to services is through Family Community
Resource Centers (run by IDHS)
Chicago Jobs Council
Workforce Development
Resources
cjc.net
wire.cjc.net
ilworks4
future.org
greencollar
chicago.org
Chicago Jobs Council
Questions?
Contact information
Lore Baker
Executive Director, SHPA
[email protected]
217-528-9814
Johnna Lowe
Resident Education & Advocacy Coordinator, SHPA
[email protected]
312-202-0256
Chicago Jobs Council
Thanks!
Chicago Jobs Council

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