Step UP! - Southern Illinois University

Report
FALL 2014
Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Avoid
Don’tthe
Ruin
Embarrassing
Your Reputation
Posts
Most
problems
happen in
group
settings.
Fundamentals
You WILL be in
a situation in
which you can
help in the
future.
Friends are
usually in a
better position
to do
something.
DO
SOMETHING!
WHAT WOULD IT TAKE
FOR YOU
TO DO SOMETHING?
Click on the picture to watch the video
Which do you think is most important in
determining whether someone will help?

Individual

Situational

Victim
The Step UP! Model
1. Notice the event
2. Interpret it as a problem
3. Assume personal responsibility
4. Know how to help
5. Step UP!
Latane and Darley, 1970
1 – Notice the event
Awareness Test
Click on the picture to watch the video
2 – Interpret it as a problem
Ambiguity
Conformity
Click on the picture to watch the video
3 – Assume personal responsibility
Diffusion of Responsibility
Bystanders assume someone else
will do something
The Bystander Effect
The phenomenon in which the
greater the number of people
present, the less likely people
are to help a person in distress.
When an emergency situation
occurs, observers are more
likely to take action if there are
few or no other witnesses.
I always
wondered why
somebody
didn’t do
something
about it, then I
realized I’m
that
somebody.
Bystanders Lift Car
Click on the picture to watch the video
4 – Know how to help
Strategies
1. Learn direct and
indirect skills.
2. Be prepared.
3. Know resources.
Snack Man
Click on the picture to watch the video
Strategies
1. Carefully consider the
situation before taking
any action.
2. BE THE FIRST!
3. Create shared and agreed upon
standards of behavior & expectations
within any group or organization.
Consider the
costs of
NOT intervening
Perspective Taking
What would you want
someone to do
for you or for someone
you care about?
Obedience to
Perceived Authority
The Milgram Experiment
Obedience to
Perceived Authority
FAMU Hazing Death
The S.E.E. Model
SAFE Responding
EARLY Intervention
EFFECTIVE Helping
Emergency Helping
Stay calm
Evaluate the situation
Consider options – direct and/or indirect
Offer support but don’t be part of the problem
Know your limits – walk away if it’s unsafe!
Non-Emergency Helping
Consider frequency, duration and severity
Define the problem and the barriers
Determine the goal; Develop a game plan
Set boundaries – don’t enable
Maintain respect
Consider options; Know resources
Value-Based Decisions
Is it worth it?
Why People Intervene
It was the right thing to do.
I would want someone to help me in that situation.
Someone needed help.
Friends should look out for each other.
So the situation wouldn’t escalate.
5 – Step UP!
DO
SOMETHING!
Scenario
You are at a party. During the past hour you notice
one of your male friends has been talking to a
young woman. They seem to be having a good
time, but it is clear that the woman has had too
much to drink.
You see your friend step away and come back with
drinks for both of them.
A few minutes later you see him put his arm
around the young woman and start to lead her
upstairs. What do you do?
Dating/Domestic Violence
What it Can Look Like
 How to Step UP!

Stalking
What it Can Look Like
 How to Step UP!

Alcohol
What it Can Look Like
 How to Step UP!

{

similar documents