Intro to LAMP Basic Concepts - Assistive Technology of Alaska

Report
AAC and Autism
An Introduction to LAMP:
Language Acquisition through Motor
Planning
Margaret Perkins M.A. CCC-SLP, ATP
Communication without Limitations
What LAMP and AAC is NOT
Augmentative
 Alternative
 Communication


Device used along side other approaches
– ABA, PECS, Floor time, etc.
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
“…I think that it is not okay to get it wrong
for even one person; when we talk about
communication, we are talking about
peoples’ lives, no less than that…..If we get
it wrong, if we miss the boat – people
drown.”
Pat Mirenda from ‘A Back Door Approach to
Autism and AAC’ September 2008
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Desired Outcomes

(1) that the children will become more proficient
communicators, utilizing a variety of communication
modes which may include AAC, speech production, or a
combination of the two;

(2) that language comprehension and expression will
develop so that the children can communicate beyond
the one word level; and

(3) that the children will develop an increased
understanding of the power of communication.
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
LAMP approach
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Communication Goal

Same as for all AAC users
–
–
–
–
S: Spontaneous
N: Novel
U: Utterance
G: Generation
i.e. expressive, generative communication
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Sensory Processing and ASD

Sensory processing disorders in those individuals
with autism are well documented in the basic
science and literature and in first-person
accounts of those living with autism. These
children and adolescents respond differently to
sensory experiences than do their peers without
disabilities.
Tomchek & Dunn, AJOT Vol. 61, Number 2 p. 190
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
AAC & Autism:
Sensory Processing

Sensory processing refers to our ability to take in
information through our senses (touch, movement,
smell, taste, vision, and hearing), organize and interpret
that information, and make a meaningful response.
-Foundation for Knowledge in Development

In contrast, sensory processing dysfunction is a disorder
in which sensory input is not integrated or organized
appropriately in the brain and may produce varying
degrees of problems in development, information
processing, and behavior.
-Cindy Hatch-Rasmussen, M.A., OTR/L
www.autism.org/si
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Typical Sensory Difficulties

Difficulty modulating sensory information may
be involved with:
– Auditory Processing
 Also Auditory filtering & auditory hyper & hyposensitivity
– Visual Responding
 Avoidance of eye contact & inefficient use of eye gaze
 Atypical use of peripheral vision
– Tactile hypersensitivity
 Possibly interconnected with inflexible behaviors & repetitive
verbalizations
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Considerations for AAC & Autism

Most likely have Sensory Processing Impairment

Focus on coordinating three sensory systems for
language acquisition
– Motor movement (proprioceptive system)
– Auditory (hearing)
– Visual

Should also be aware of
– Tactile and vestibular
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
ASD Learning Characteristics
Likely have gifted Visual memory (rote)
 Excellent visual spatial pattern recognition
 Strength in rule-based learning
 Gestalt learner (chunked learning)

– ‘the whole is greater than the sum of its parts”

Frequently hyperlexic
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
LAMP approach
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
LAMP: Consistent & Unique Motor
Patterns

Each Word has it’s own
unique Motor Pattern
– Focus on Pattern, not icon

Language connections
made through:
– Initiating a unique motor
pattern and hearing a word
– Experiencing other’s
reaction to the word
– repetition of the Motor
Pattern & experience with
words
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
How to Model Vocabulary to Achieve
Motor Automaticity






The goal is that the child will press the correct icon or icon
sequence spontaneously and independently. However, to get to
that end, you may have to help the child through the movement
initially. You want to back off the amount of cuing that you are
giving as soon as possible so that the child does not become cue
dependent. Remember, it is a lot easier to remember how to get
somewhere if you were the driver last time rather than the
passenger.
Levels of motor assistance:
Hand over hand
Point to icon
Point to general area of icon
Point to device
Wait for child to activate
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company

Fitts and Posner (1967) proposed a three stage model of motor
learning. The first stage is the cognitive stage in which the learner
has to attend to the process of learning a motor action. This stage
is marked by highly variable performance. The learner may or may
not know what they are doing wrong or how to correct their
performance and will need guidance to assist them. In the
associative stage, he works on refining his skill and is able to detect
and correct their errors. The autonomous stage is the result of a lot
of practice. At this stage, the learner does not have to concentrate
on the movement and can attend to other aspects of the activity.
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Motor Planning and AAC
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Automaticity: The Great Equalizer

Natural Language
– Cognitive activity: Formulation of thoughts
– Motor activity: Speech & Gesture (automatic)

AAC Language
– Cognitive activity: Formulation of thoughts
– Motor activity: Device activation (automatic???)
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company


"In the practiced automatic movements of daily life
attention is directed to the sense impression and not to
the movement. So, in piano playing, the beginner may
attend to his fingers but the practiced player attends
only to the notes or to the melody. In speaking, writing
and reading aloud, and in games and manual work,
attention is always directed to the goal, never to the
movement. In fact, as soon as attention is directed to
the movement, this becomes less automatic and less
dependable."
Cattell, J.M. 1893
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Fundamentals of Motor Planning in
AAC

Stop Looking
– Meaning of each location must be unique and
consistent
– Focus more on patterns, less on picture interpretation
 Location label (icon/picture/word) becomes ‘placeholder’

Stop Thinking
– Predictable next movement
– Teach patterns
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Motor Planning and AAC

“Using Motor Planning for language acquisition
requires more than simply keeping icons in
stable locations. It requires an understanding of
where the system is headed years down the
line, and teaching the motor patterns
accordingly. The motor patterns must not
change, rather they build upon themselves as
vocabulary increases and language skills
develop.”
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Physiology Matters

Law of Neural Habit (1890s)
– Repetition of a neuromotor
pathway eventually requires
less energy & enhances
performance

Pathways are physiological,
chemical processes

The same physiology that
makes a movement strong
also makes it hard to
change
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Consistent and Unique Motor Patterns

LAMP was developed with two “levels” of motor
planning. Level 1 requires a single movement before the
word is spoken by the device.

Level 2 requires two movements before a word is
spoken.

Unity® vocabularies were used because they support
consistent motor patterns that builds in a systematic
fashion.
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
LAMP approach
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Auditory Processing and ASD

“Autistic children typically have
problems processing auditory
information. One auditory
processing problem occurs when
a person hears speech sounds
but does not perceive the
meaning of the sounds.
Sometimes the lack of speech
comprehension is interpreted by
others as an unwillingness to
comply. However, the person
may not be able to retrieve the
meaning of the sound at that Stephen M. Edelson, Ph.D, “Auditory Processing
particular time.”
Problems in Autism”
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Auditory Filtering



“Sensory Processing in Children With and Without Autism”
Compared 281 children 3-6 y.o. with ASD to age-matched peers who
were typically developing.
Items
– Is distracted or has trouble functioning if there is a lot noise around
 58% ASD compared to 2.9%
– Appears to not hear what you say
 73% ASD compared to 4.3%
– Can’t work with background noise
 12.5% ASD compared to 2.9%
– Has difficulty paying attention
 79% ASD compared to 1.8%
Tomchek & Dunn, AJOT Vol. 61, Number 2 p. 190
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Auditory Signals
Keep language models short, simple, natural
 Focus on words ‘spoken’ by child with AAC device

– And their natural consequences

Little to NO verbal prompts initially
– Limit auditory input that child needs to process
– Avoid ‘cluttering’ interaction with verbal prompting
 May not be understood
 Could encourage verbal prompt dependency and ‘key pushers’
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Auditory Signals

“Input from the vestibular, proprioceptive, and auditory
systems is critical for the development of speech and
language (1989, Windeck & Laurel)

Children need to experience words, not just repeat them
– In LAMP each unique motor pattern = specific auditory signal
 a specific word

Needs to be immediate (both signal and response)
– Engagement and attention likely short-lived for student with ASD
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Language Connections


The AAC device is a tool that allows the child to “babble”
and learn about language. For example, after saying
“more” to get bubbles, the child might think that
pressing the key for “more” means “bubbles.” A
beginning talker might make the same conclusion.
However, in another instance what the auditory signal
means when the child says “more” and gets more juice,
the meaning of “more” is revised by the child.
As the child learns with the AAC device, he/she is
learning consistent motor patterns that result in an
auditory signal. Depending on the natural consequence
triggered by the auditory signal, the child may modify
his/her perception of what the auditory signal means.
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
LAMP Language Consideration:
Single Words

“Communication is based on the
use of the individual words of our
language. True communication is
spontaneous and novel. Therefore,
communication systems cannot be
based significantly on pre-stored
sentences. Communication
requires access to a vocabulary of
individual words suitable to our
needs that are multiple and
subject to change. These words
must be selected to form the
sentences that we wish to say.” ASHA’s AAC Glossary
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Language Development
Questions




Is there research establishing a process for normal
language acquisition?
Is normal language acquisition a simple or complex
process?
Have you seen research that establishes how children
with developmental disabilities acquire language?
In the absence of this research, on what do you base
your intervention for helping children with disabilities
acquire language?
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
From ASHA Leader
“To integrate AAC systems with the curriculum, we must consider
several issues. First, language develops and expands in an orderly
fashion. Our devices and systems must allow for this development
from the beginning. Typically, children acquire spoken language
by progressing from one-word utterances to two-word utterances
to simple sentences and so on. Language form, function, and use
proceed in a fairly predictable pattern. AAC intervention should
begin early, and clinicians should provide support for the way we
know language typically develops rather than use devices that
generate complete sentences at the onset.”
Julie Schers and Pamela Hart, Wichita State University
The ASHA Leader Vol. 7 No. 16 Sept. 10, 2002
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Words vs. Phrases for Autism

Individuals with ASD tend to be ‘Gestalt Learners’

Tendency to take in chunks of info
– Phrase “I want spin toy” is learned as 1 entity
– Even the simple phrase “I want”

Phrases = participation, don’t build language skills
– Individual words are the building blocks of language
– We can have participators AND communicators

Two words can be something new
– Two phrases can only be two phrases
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
LAMP approach
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Natural Consequences

No Mistakes: Respond to all
communication

Respond Naturally & with
Animation
– Ex. Loud crunching when
pretending to ‘eat’

Use Natural responses to
build language
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Natural, Visual Consequences

Emphasize words with a natural visual reaction
– “Interestingly, those individuals who do not have
auditory processing problems are often ‘auditory
learners.’ These children do very well using the ABA
approach, whereas those who are visual learners do not
do as well…given this, one might suspect that many
visual learners have auditory processing problems and
that visual learners will do well with a visual
communication/instruction approach.”
Stephen M. Edelson, Ph.D, “Auditory Processing Problems in Autism”
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Core Words & Natural
Consequences

‘go’ has a natural consequence that child can see
 How would you respond to ‘Wednesday’ in a meaningful way?

‘more’ would have a similar visual consequence
 “What color is this?” facilitates response ‘red’

Conveniently, core words are the most powerful
 Can be used in virtually any activity
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Core Defined

Words that are common to peers of a similar
age. They are common words used across all
communication environments…which include
structure words (e.g. want, more) that provide a
framework for functional language use.
(Banajee et.al., 2003)
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Evidence Based Practice
Despite evidence that nouns are not among
core vocabulary used by
preschoolers…clinicians typically select
nouns representing foods and objects as
first symbols when designing AAC systems.
(Banajee, et. al., 2003)
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
333 Most Frequently Occurring Preschool Words: The Marvin Sampling
Compared with Banajee Sampling: all words present
a
about
after
again
all
almost
already
also
an
and
another
ant
any
are
aren't
around
as
at
away
baby
back
bad
bad
ball
bathroom
be
bean
because
before
being
bet
better
big
bird
birds
bite
black
blue
both
box
boy
bugs
but
buy
by
bye
call
came
can
can't
candy
car
catch
cause
chair
come
comes
cookie
corn
could
couldn't
cup
cut
day
did
didn't
different
do
does
doctor
doesn't
dog
doing
don't
done
door
down
drink
duck
eat
eating
else
even
everybody
everything
face
fall
find
finger
fire
first
five
fixed
fly
foot
for
from
found
get
gets
getting
girl
girls
give
go
goes
going
gonna
good
great
green
guys
had
hair
hand
hands
has
have
haven't
he
he's
her
head
hear
hello
help
here
here's
hi
high
hill
him
his
hold
home
horse
hot
house
how
huh
hum
I
I'll
I'm
if
in
inside
is
isn't
it
it's
juice
jump
jumped
jumping
just
kind
know
last
leaves
let
let's
lift
like
little
long
look
looking
lot
lunch
made
make
man
many
may
maybe
me
mean
messy
middle
mine
mom
mommy
more
most
move
much
must
my
myself
Name
name
named
need
never
new
next
nice
no
not
of
off
oh
other
ok
old
on
one
only
open
or
our
ours
out
over
paint
people
pet
name
pick
piece
play
please
push
put
ready
really
red
remember
ride
right
room
run
said
same
saw
say
see
she
she's
show
shut
side
sit
so
still
today
we're
some
together
well
somebody
too
went
someone
top
were
something
toys
what
sometimes
trees
what's
somewhere
try
when
stop
trying
where
stuff
turn
where's
swing
turtles
which
tape
two
while
tell
um
who
than
up
who
that
us
whole
that's
use
why
the
used
with
their
very
won't
them
wait
would
then
want
ya
there
wanted
yes
there's
was
yet
there's
wasn't
you
these
watch
you'll
they
water
you're
they'll
way
your
they're
we
yours
thing
we'll
things
this
those
three
threw
through
time
to
Christine A. Marvin,
David R. Beukelman,
Denise Bilyeu
AAC, Vol. 10, Dec.,
Planning’ authored
1994by
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Toddler Vocabulary Arranged by Frequency
Words
Percentage
I
No
Yes/yea
my
the
want
is
it
that
a
go
mine
you
what
on
in
here
more
out
off
some
help
all done/finished
9.5
8.5
7.6
5.8
5.2
5.0
4.9
4.9
4.9
4.6
4.4
3.8
26 core words
3.2
shown at left
3.1
2.8
comprise 96.3
2.7
2.7
percent of the total
2.6
words used by
2.4
2.3
toddlers in this
2.3
2.1
Banajee et al.
study
1.0
96.3%
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language
Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
LAMP Language Consideration:
Core Words

Essential for expressive
communication

Children with ASD tend not to
spontaneously generalize concepts

Core words can be used in multiple
contexts with varied meanings

Essential for ASD student to make
language connections
– Used to build flexibility with language
meaning
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Core Vocabulary has few
Picture Producers

Fewer than 5 percent of all words used by
toddlers are picture producers
(Banajee, Dicarlo & Stricklin, AAC, 2003)

Concrete graphics can only be made for picture
producers

More than 90 percent of core vocabulary words
are not picture producers
(Hill, Dissertation, Establishment of Performance Indices, 2001)
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
LAMP approach
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Readiness to Learn

In preparation for learning child may need:
– Calming:
 rocking, brushing, massage, push/pull, oral
motor (chewing, sucking), quiet sounds
– Alerting:
 swinging, rolling, dancing, oral motor (sour,
crunchy).
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Shared Focus

“Sensory modulation impairments represent a
mismatch between the external contextual
demands of the child’s environment and his or
her internal characteristics (e.g. attention,
emotion, sensory processing) and can impair the
ability of the child with autism to sustain
engagement with people or in activities.”
Tomchek & Dunn, AJOT Vol. 61, Number 2 p. 190
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Shared Focus

Vary activities to find motivator
– Use that motivator for language learning

Follow your student’s lead, give up control
– Can be flexible and still meet goals
Keep student challenged by building on activity
 Attend to their every move

– Treat everything as intentional and purposeful

Be prepared to move
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Shared Focus

Capture attention by
doing surprising and
novel things

Avoid predictability

Don’t be afraid to be
Goofy

Goal is to engage student
– Then teach language
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Shared Focus
Use isolated interests as
opportunity to teach language
PASSION Not OBSESSION
 Compliance
vs.
Communication


Stop asking “What”
start asking “Which”

Stop Testing
Start Teaching
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Taking advantage of Expected
Behaviors

Mis-hits offer a profound
learning opportunity
– if met with natural
consequences

Device exploration is OKAY
– Will depend upon
reinforcement
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Strategies
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Strategies
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Strategies: Vocabulary Builder
Hide Show

Hide keys temporarily if behavior is roadblock
– Hide keys as needed during activity
 Adjust vocabulary based on child-directed activity
– Show keys (vocabulary) for specific activity
 Remember goal: learn motor patterns for individual words
 Use of AAC device mimics speech in that it’s a motor movement that
produces a consistent sensory feedback
– Remember: Include keys for ‘mishit’ learning opportunities
– Try showing all keys when child is engaged in motivating activity
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Why High Tech

Auditory signals

Technology bridges the cognitive gap
 Keep same system as language grows

Dynamic display allows for quick programming
to keep up with student.

Example of Vocabulary Builder Tool
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Strategy: Device Introduction

During the initial stages of intervention, it may be
necessary to limit use of the AAC device to a controlled
setting. If possible, plan for one to five intensive therapy
sessions before introducing the device in other settings,
such as a classroom or home. As the child is gaining
success in use of the device, introduce more use of the
device in less controlled settings. The introduction of the
device into these settings will be dependent on a wide
range of variables, including the skills and attitudes of
the communication partners and the degree of
simulation in the environment.
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
“The reason children fail with their communication
systems is because they’re too easy.”
John Halloran, M.S., CCC-SLP
Arkansas
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company
Prentke Romich Company
Communication without limitations
Margaret Perkins, MA CCC-SLP, ATP
Office: (760) 431– 8875
Toll Free: 1-800-262-1984 ext 420
Email: [email protected]
www.prentrom.com
Adapted from ‘LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning’ authored by
John Halloran, MS, CCC-SLP and Mia Emerson, MS, CCC-SLP
Prentke Romich Company

similar documents