3 hrs CSEC - Texas Network of Youth Services

Report
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AEquitas: The Prosecutors’ Resource on Violence Against Woman
THIS PRESENTATION USES STREET LANGUAGE
If you are bothered by raw language and
behavior, I encourage you to take care of
yourself.
I will also suggest that if it does, then this
might not be the population you want to work
with.
1 _______GUNS_______________
2 ___HUMAN TRAFFICKING ____
3 _______DRUGS_______________
PIMP: _________________________________________
_______________________________________________
HO’: __________________________________________
_______________________________________________
TRANSLATE:
“I no choose susie. Pays my taxes. But Janice peeled by
that Jonas gorilla.”
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
It is difficult to get accurate statistics of
domestic minor sex trafficking. It is believed
around 300,000 children in the United are
trafficked each year.
Children in all 50 States are at risk for
commercial exploitation at any given time.
Some numbers we do know:
325,000 children are reported as being sexually
exploited in the United States annually:
121,911 ran away from home
51,602 thrown out of their homes by a
parent or guardian
Among runaway and homeless youth, about 30%
of shelter youth and 70% of street youth engaged
in trade for trade sex in order to meet daily needs
40% of the girls and 30% of the boys who
“entered” into Trafficking situations were sexually
abused at home.
16
AGE OF CONSENT BY STATE
17
Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas,
Connecticut, D.C., Georgia,
Hawaii, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas,
Kentucky, Maine, Maryland,
Massachusetts, Michigan,
Minnesota, Mississippi,
Montana, Nevada, New
Hampshire, New Jersey, N.
Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma,
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island,
South Carolina, South Dakota,
Vermont, Washington,
West Virginia
Colorado, Illinois,
Louisiana,
Missouri,
Nebraska,
New Mexico,
New York, Texas
18
Arizona,
California,
Delaware,
Florida, Idaho,
North Dakota,
Oregon,
Tennessee,
Utah, Virginia,
Wisconsin,
Wyoming
DO YOU KNOW OR HAVE YOU
WORKED WITH A COMMERCIALLY
EXPLOITED CHILD (CEC)?
American Children under the age of 18
Exploited by an adult who controls them
The victim rarely realizes they are a victim
Happens differently than other forms of
child abuse
the abuse does not happen in secrecy
In the case of Commercial Sexual Exploitation the child
may be groomed by the trafficker/pimp to act as the
seducer.
Erikson’s Stages of Child Development
Stage
Age
Basic Conflict
Summary
Oral Sensory
Birth-12/18 mo. Trust vs. Mistrust
forms a loving, trusting
relationship with the caregiver, or
develops a sense of mistrust.
Muscular-Anal
18 mo-3 years
Autonomy vs.
Shame/Doubt
Development/control of physical
skills. Shame/doubt if not
handled well
Locomotor
3-6 years
Initiative vs. Guilt
Becomes more assertive & takes
more initiative if not guilt feelings
may develop
Latency
6-12 years
Industry vs.
Inferiority
Demands of learning new skills
or sense of inferiority, failure and
incompetence may develop
Adolescence
12-18 years
Identity vs. Role
Confusion
Must achieve a sense of identity
(sexually, politically, religiously,
etc.) or not knowing who you are
results
Human trafficking does NOT require the
crossing of international borders. It is
about the dynamics of the relationship
not the distance traveled.
Derogatory sexual comments
Controlling reproductive choices
Refusing to engage in safe sex practices
Forcing to view/act out pornography to
learn “how to be a good sexual partner”
Rendering unconscious for the purpose of
having sex
Coercion to participate in sexual activity
Gratuitous Violence
vs.
Instrumental Violence
Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000
1. recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision,
or obtaining of a person for labor or services
2. through the use of force, fraud, or coercion
3. for the purpose of subjection to involuntary
servitude, peonage, debt bondage, slavery or
forced commercial sex acts.
Force: Physical abuse, Kidnapping, Physical
restraint
Fraud: Illegitimate contracts; False promises;
Fake businesses
Coercion: Psychological manipulation; Spoken
threats about the victim, the victim’s
family, or other victims; Implied
threats; “Climate of fear” (guns, lies
about law enforcement and the outside
world); Control
Domestic minor sex trafficking occurs when a U.S.
citizen or legal permanent resident who has not
attained 18 years of age is engaged in a commercial
sex act.
“Commercial sex act” means any sex act on account
of which anything of value is given to or received by
any person. This includes:
Prostitution
Exotic dancing/stripping
Pornography
Sex Trafficking is NOT prostitution.
These children are not working for
profit or a paycheck. They are
captives to the traffickers and
keepers who control their every
move.
Children under the age of 18
ARE VICTIMS without requiring
“force, fraud, or coercion.”
First step: Fraud (recruitment)
False promises
Fake businesses
False/Servile Marriage
Second step: Force (entrapment-first indication that
something is wrong)
Physical abuse
Kidnapping
Physical restraint (tying/chaining, locking in)
Rape
Sold to another pimp
Third Step: Coercion (psychological manipulation)
Threats to harm others
Climate of Fear
Control
Commercial Exploited Youth are also
traumatized youth
Repeated experiences strengthen and sensitize the
neuronal pathway and become memories and
“habits”.
Chronic stress/abuse overdevelops the region of the
brain that deals with anxiety and fear responses.
Abused children often have greater difficulty “coping
with” kindness, nurturing and stimulation – their
brains may have underdeveloped pathways to this
region of the brain.
Repeated abuse and stress may cause changes in
attention, impulse control, sleep patterns and fine
motor control.
Perry, 2000
Traumatic Memory is
Encoded differently
Not the consequence of conscious
choice or resistance
Fragmented and discontinuous
memories
Permanently altered brain
Traumatic memories are stored as sensory experiences
sights, smells, sounds, tactile perceptions
And NOT as
sequence, context, peripheral detail(s).
Fight                    Hyper-arousal
Aggression, irritability and anger
Trouble concentrating
Distrust of others
Flee                      Withdrawal
Avoidance of other people
Withdrawal/seeking solitude
Freeze/                   Constriction/
Submit
Shutting down
Numbing; shutting down of emotional expression
Ignoring/tuning-out other people
Looking dazed, “spacy”, daydreaming
Over-compliance
Heightened amygdala and other limbic
activity
Not just a memory--Seeing and feeling
Activation of sensory areas
Inability to speak:
Decreased activation of Broca’s area
Emotions become more important
THAN language
Rauch, van der kolk, Fisler, & Alpert, 1996
TRAUMA
Remains the same
regardless of
cultural frame
Differs according to
cultural frame
PHYSIOLOGICAL
RESPONSE
INTERPRETATION OF
TRAUMATIC EVENTS
RESPONSE TO TRAUMA
MEANING OF SYMPTOMS
TRAUMA IS IN THE EYES OF THE
BEHOLDER.
Shea Alexander
WATER
Exercise
Sing
Verbalize
Write it down
Nutrition
Adequate rest
“When you are working with kids who were
traumatized prior to engaging in acting out
behaviors, you see that they are stuck
emotionally and developmentally at the age at
which they were traumatized. And they have
never worked through the trauma. Even
though they are in a 13 or 24 year old body,
there is really a 4 year old kid who is trying to
get her needs met in a very primitive 4 year
old way: “I’ll do whatever you want me to do
so that you will love me.”
Dr. Yolanda Graham
Medical Director
Inner Harbor and Angela’s House
Pimp - Pussy In My Possession
Hos - Prostitutes with no monetary focus, what a Pimp owns
Bottom Bitch - keeps pimp apprised of law-enforcement activity,
collects money, keeps the girls in line
Sister wifey/wifey - What victims call each other when have the
same pimp: obligated to have each others backs.
Track - Where the pimps and hos be at.
The Game - underground industry that participants "play"
Daddy - What hos call their pimp
Turning tricks - What a prostitute does: selling sex; the job
A trick - a person who patronizes a ho
John – a person who uses the services of a ho
A date - Euphamistic term for a turning a trick
Quota - amount of money to be made before a ho can go home
Turned Out - the first time a ho goes out on a date
www.urbandictionary.com retrieved 3/28/11
Popcorn or wannabes – new pimps
Jonas – uses violence and intimidation to control
Finesse – use of psychology to deceive
Gorilla/Godzilla – use of violence to retaliate/get what wants
Players – established pimps
Peeled – losing your property to another pimp
Choosy Susie - A ho who keeps switching her pimp
Bounce - to exit a location/situation
Pimp moving – bounce from pimp to pimp without paying the
“pimp moving” tax
Catcher-Someone who catches you at the right moment when
you feel alone and pressured
Strip- A popular street that is commonly traveled for flossin',
usually at night.
Flossin- showing off an object that posses great value
www.urbandictionary.com retrieved 3/28/11
goin down
grindin
bumping uglys
gorilla salad
get your rock soft
six pack
pack the fudge
Watersports
bukkake
bobblehead
hit the slip n slide
donkey punch
angry dragon
smurf
leather Cheerio
fist or fisting
http://www.sexglossary.com
dirty sanchez
bangin
raw
train
violet wand
rimming
bareback
Danza slap
Pimps who were abused as children
Pimps who grew up “in the life” (generational)
Pimps who are mostly drug dealers (1 girl/boy)
Guerrilla pimps known for their violence and
brutality
Sneaker, subway or Simps who are considered to be
at the bottom of the food chain
Girls Like Us by Rachel Loyd 2011
Pre-meditation
Planning
Manipulation
Deceit
Betrayal of trust
Drugs and Alcohol
Force
Fear
Disabling
What does a pimp look
like?
Pimps consider pimping to be an art and a
lifestyle that is lived by following specific
rules, regulations, philosophy and ideology
which promotes an exploitative culture
among young girls and boys in the U.S.
The first step is getting her to totally depend on you. You’ll
start to dress her, think for her, own her. Her family will
become her No. 1 enemy and she’ll attack them with all she
has because they are trying to keep her from that which
brings her joy - You. If you and your victim are sexually
active, then slow it down. Once a week is fine. After sex,
take her shopping for one item. Hair and/or nails are
fine. She will develop a feeling of accomplishment. The
shopping after a month will be replaced with cash. The love
making turns into raw sex. She’ll start to crave the intimacy
and be willing to get back into your good graces: you have
broken her spirit and she has no sense of self-value. Now
pimp, put a price tag on the item you have manufactured.”
Look for victims who appear to be lost, alone,
homeless or runaways, loners, depressed
Hang out at transit stations, schools, malls,
youth groups, after school programs, near group
homes
Short dating relationship which includes gifts
“If you love me you’ll sleep a few of my
friends,” or “you are now my bitch and will do
what I say or I will kill your family &/or you”
Provide basic needs
Victims often branded with tattoos
In the first stage the girl is made to feel attractive and
wanted. Drugs may be introduced and sex between
them is always part of the process.
In the second stage the pimp breaks her will through
physical and verbal abuse preparing her for a life of
prostitution. He will move her around to break her ties
with family and friends.
Klain, 1999
Where Sex Trafficking happens in the U.S?
Street Prostitution Rings
Residential Brothels
Massage Parlors
Internet-based
Commercial Sex
Hostess & Strip Clubs
Escort Services
Truck Stops
Pornography
Private Homes
Threaten Victim’s families
Branded Victims
Isolate Victims
Beat and rape Victims into subjection
Tell Victims: “for your own good”,
“daddy knows best”
“you were born to be a 'ho'
and that's all you’ll ever be”
Victim often not allowed to come home until the quota
of money is met, which is handed over to the pimp.
In Oakland (2002), police identified 218 minors, ages
11- 15, being prostituted by 155 pimps. Each girl had
a quota of $500 a day
$ 500 x 7 =
$3,500 x 52 =
$ 3,500.00/week
$182,000/year
Each sexually exploited youth = $182,000/year
Pimps advertise openly in newspapers, tabloids, and on
the Internet.
Backpage.com makes $22 million a year
from ads for prostitution.
www.change.org
An estimated 100,000 youth in our country are being
exploited through the commercial sex industry and yet
our culture glorifies pimping and turned 'pimp' into a
word that now means being a playa, being fly, being a
'real' man.
www.thegrio.com/entertainment/jay-zs-big-pimpin-regret-a-blueprint-for-hip-hop-culture.php
12/1/10
retrieved 3/17/11
“I never met a juvenile in prostitution who didn’t
have a pimp.”
Sharon Marcus-Kurn,
Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
“I have never seen a case where a child approached
an adult and said ‘OK, can you be my pimp?’ A
pimp is typically a man who has developed a
relationship with her, claims he loves her and this
child really, truly feels she loves this man.”
Linda Watson
Probation Officer
DeKalb County Juvenile Justice Department
April 3, 9:35 pm
Met this guy at the mall. Said he couldn’t believe
I didn’t have a boyfriend.
April 10, 11 pm
He bought me dinner and a bracelet!
June 21, 10:30 pm
My man is taking me to New York City to be in a
video!
July 24, 3:15 am
Turned seven tricks last night. Can’t wash the smell
off my skin……
The Home for Little Wayfarers
SOCIAL AUTOPSY
Age
Date
Agency
Allegation
Disposition
1
2/92
CPS
Physical Abuse
Family Preservation
2
1/93
Physical Abuse
Family Preservation
CPS
4
4/95
CPS
Physical Abuse
Family Preservation
9
10/00
CPS
Neglect & Physical
Abuse
1 child removed/6 months
parenting classes
11
10/02
CPS
Sexual Abuse
Mom’s boyfriend - mother didn’t
believe/attempt suicide
12
111/03
Police
13 runaway incidents
Recovered – taken home
12
1/04
Police
Physical Abuse
No action
12
4/04
Police
Aggravated Assault
Conflicts at home
Parental neglect
Physical and/or sexual abuse
Homelessness/housing instability
Poverty
Educational failure
Emotional problems
Running away from home
Sleeps most of the day because up at night
Moved from city to city
Limited access to phones, computer, freedom of
movements, contact with family or friends
Must meet quota before they can return home
to their pimp, get food or shelter
Often witness violence
Drugs, Guns and Money
8 hours of rape and sexual assault a day
56 hrs/wk; 224 hrs/mo. and 2,688 hours
in a year to self and others
Assault from Johns
rape, stabbings, attempted murder
Assault from Bottom Bitch
Assault from other Victims
I was 16 when I met my first pimp -- he told me I
was pretty - that he wanted me to be his
girlfriend. I was just a kid, and I believed him.
Soon he was selling me for sex every day: I was
raped 365 days a year.
I was sold to other pimps, back and forth
between them like an animal. One pimp gouged
my cheek with a potato peeler as a warning not
to run away, but after two years I worked up the
courage and ran anyway. He tracked me down
and beat me and stomped on me, breaking my
ribs and jaw. That’s when I went to the police.
Assaulted
Raped
Acute injuries
Fractures, head injury, lacerations,
bruises, abdominal trauma, burns
Anogenital trauma
Shock, bleeding, infection
Scarring, disfigurement, loss of
function
STI, PID,
Drug intoxication/withdrawal
Pregnancy
Picked up by police/Juvenile detention
intake
Community ED
Children’s hospital ED
Urgent care
Public clinics
Private clinics
Backroom ‘clinics’
Obstetrician, pediatrician
Rape crisis center
School nurse
Age of first involvement with any
system is 12. There have been
girls as young as 9.
U.S. Department of Justice
Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section
2005
Study of 113 Johns:
Paid for sex because no real barriers/consequences
40% bought sex from women they knew had a pimp
32% believed most entered the sex industry before
the age of 14
Johns are often not caught or prosecuted
A form of educational intervention or diversion
program
Some jurisdictions Johns may be sentenced men to a
john school as a condition of probation.
the john often pays a fee to enroll
john schools often last for one day
Focus -on the experiences and harms of prostitution:
violence
sexually transmitted diseases
effects on families and communities.
In 2012 about
21,000 calls were
received at the
National Human
Trafficking Hotline.
Around 6,575 calls
were from Texas
and include both
International and
Domestic
Trafficking as well
as all forms of
Human Trafficking
polaris.org/resources/hotline/statistics
When spouses and intimate partners compel their
partner to engage in commercial sex, domestic
servitude, or forced labor or “for the benefit of the
family, the relationship” to provide financial support
for the household, support an addiction, car payment,
etc.
“A woman feared she would never see her young child again
unless she complied with her husband’s scheme to sell her
sexual services….”
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/03/17/clinton-danner-sold-his-w_n_503358.html
Parents, aunts, uncles, older siblings, cousins,
grandparents, or older family friend, compels
the child into commercial sex acts by using the
existing power dynamics and vulnerabilities of
the child.
This helps explain why children may not protest
and often submit to parental authority.
As a result, the child “submits” to their own
victimization.
Often found among migrant and seasonal farmworkers:
men, women, families, or children as young as 5 or 6,
who harvest crops, raise animals, “work” at packing
plants, orchards, and nurseries.
Unscrupulous crew leaders often add debt along with
violence and threats of violence to hold farmworkers in
conditions of servitude.
www.polarisproject.org/human-trafficking/labor-trafficking-in-the-us/agriculture-a-farms
Domestic Workers
Work within employers’ households: cooking, cleaning,
child-care, elder care, gardening, and other household
work. May or may not live in employer’s homes and may
or may not be U.S. citizens.
Commonly work 10 to 16 hours a day for little to no pay,
are isolated and live in fear.
“When he found out that I could braid hair he
also used me as a maid at one of his girlfriend's
shops … I braided hair while he collected the
money.”
http://www.polarisproject.org/human-trafficking/labor-trafficking-in-the-us/domestic-work
Hostesses and Strip Clubs
Forced to dance, serve as hostesses, or
sell drinks and/or food.
May be forced to strip, dance, or entertain customers for
long hours with limited to no control over their schedule,
movement, and/or money.
“They told me I was going to have to work at a strip club. They forced
me to work six days a week for twelve hours a day. I could not refuse to
go to work or I would be beaten. I had to hand over all of my money. I
was often yelled at for not making enough money or had a gun put to my
face. Every week I handed over around $3,000 to $4,000. I was their
slave.”
www.polarisproject.org/human-trafficking/labor-trafficking-in-the-us/hostess-a-strip-clubs
“I was an easy target for my trafficker - a desperate mother looking for
a way to provide for my three children. I was told that I would have a
good job with good pay and a place to live. When I got here I was
locked in the factory and forced to work 17 to 18 hours a day, seven
days a week.“
Occurring mostly in the garment and food processing
plants, victims (men & women) have been forced to work
10-12 hour days, 6-7 days per week with little or no
break time, pay, nor freedom of movement.
www.polarisproject.org/human-trafficking/labor-trafficking-in-the-us/factories
Sales crews usually recruit American youth, with promises of
travel and ability to make a lot of money. A "crew" can
have 3 to 40 youth. Under the “manager”, the crew moves
from city to city every few weeks and receives a small daily
stipend. Violence, sexual assault, sexual harassment,
pressure tactics, and abandonment in unfamiliar cities are
common.
After graduating high school, a young man was approached by a recruiter who told
him he could travel around the US and make $350 a week selling skincare
products. The young man joined a crew and traveled in a van around the Midwest. The
crew leaders charged exorbitant fees for transportation, lodging, food, and set fines if a
crew member was late or failed to meet sales quotas. If a crew member failed to make
the quota for several days, they were denied food, and sometimes abandoned without
any money. After being assaulted by a crew leader, the young man decided that he
needed to leave. He called a friend, collect, from a pay phone.
www.polarisproject.org/human-trafficking/labor-trafficking-in-the-us/peddling-a-begging-rings
Room attendants; front desk,
kitchen, restaurant, server or bell staff;
marketing; casinos; or any service offered
by a hotel. The trafficker may be the hotel
management or a labor recruiter/broker.
If not hired directly by the hotel,
the hotel may or may not be aware of
the abuse.
While working at a hotel as a maid, a woman was offered
a job at a hotel in another city ,where, she was told, she
could make more money. When she arrived, she work
extremely long hours, was paid sporadically and in small amounts. Far from home and
with little money she was afraid to leave. When she raised her concerns to the owners,
she was told that they would abandon her with nothing if she complained.
www.polarisproject.org/human-trafficking/labor-trafficking-in-the-us/hospitality-industry
Restaurants have been investigated
in multiple states, including TX,
where victims are forced to work as
waiters, bussers, kitchen staff,
cooks/chefs with little or no pay.
They may experience erratic working hours or
overwork, with little time off to sleep eat, seek help.
www.polarisproject.org/human-trafficking/labor-trafficking-in-the-us/restaurants-a-food-service
Trafficking can occur in any industry with a
demand for cheap labor and a lack of rigorous
monitoring.
Victims are forced to work against their will in
exploitative conditions for little or no pay.
www.polarisproject.org/human-trafficking/labor-trafficking-in-the-us/other-industries
When a parent (s) or family member sells the child
for sex to make their car payment –
it is familial sex trafficking and child abuse.
makes their child work long hours at the family
business under duress instead of going to
school/playing with friends –
it is familial labor trafficking and child abuse.
When a teenage boy convinces his girlfriend to sell
sexual favors to feed his drug addiction –
it is intimate partner sex trafficking and teen
dating violence.
What stops us from understanding that
domestic violence, sexual assault and
human trafficking involve the same types
of power and control, cyclical violence
and manipulative perpetrators?
And when these dynamics collide why do
see only one and not the others?
Domestic Violence and
Interpersonal Violence and
Sexual Assault and
Forced Labor and
Human Trafficking
Commercially Exploited Children do not
have
ONE story
It is critical that the agencies designed to
help children are aware of and informed by
the individual victim’s experience.
They need to know:
What Trafficking is
They are a victim not a criminal
It is not their fault
“Pimping” is illegal
They have rights and options
If the Pimp has sold a story to the victim that
has, up to this point been true, how do you get
the victim to answer questions?
How do you get out of “meet the new boss,
same as the old boss” mold?
IF CHILD is a MINOR (UNDER 17)
CPS
LE
We are here to help you
Your safety is our first priority
We will get you the medical attention
you need
We want to make sure that what has
happened to you does not happen to
someone else
Clothing
Personal Hygiene items
Snacks
MEDICAL ISSUES TAKE PRECEDENCE
Before engaging the victim in their story please
give them time to shower, sleep, eat, rest and
settle in.
If possible limit their story with one person
who is that person?
who decides that?
Using the right language is important
QUESTIONS TO ASK
Can you leave if you want to?
What are your working conditions like?
Is someone forcing you to do anything you do
not want to do?
Do you like to travel? Where have you
been?
Did a boyfriend ever ask you to have sex with
someone else?
What’s your boyfriend’s name? Is that his
street name?
Ever exchanged sex for money, drugs, food
or shelter?
QUESTIONS TO ASK
Charged with shop lifting/petty theft? Of What?
Been out of school? Last grade completed?
Ever been in CPS custody?
Runaway history? How long missing? Who did
they stay with? Where did you go? Where did you
sleep? How did you eat?
Do you have a street name you would like to go
by?
What do you do to make quick cash?
Did you go to other cities? States? What did you
do?
What is you daddy’s name? Is that his street
name? Do you know his legal name?
What kind of things does he buy you?
QUESTIONS TO ASK
Did anyone make you do things you didn’t want
to do?
Tell me about the “family” you were staying
with.
Did you have to do anything to stay with them?
What do you do during the day?
How old is he? Does he know you are a minor?
Does he make you turn tricks? Work on the track?
Does he have a bottom bitch or a first wife? Does
he tell everyone they were going to get married?
Ever meet dates at hotels/people’s homes?
QUESTIONS TO ASK
Does your daddy hit you? Afraid of him?
Able to use the phone to call family or
friends?
How long have you been with him?
Able to come and go as you please?
How much money do you have to bring
home?
Do you have sister wifey’s? How many? How
old are they?
Been in trouble with the police? What did they
arrest you for? How long were you locked up?
Did your daddy come and get you?
Listen for
Language used to describe people
and events
Talk about missing their daddy
Leading questions IF you know the answers
“I know____ and it’s OK BECAUSE
YOU ARE A VICTIM”
Det. Cathy de La Paz
Sgt Byron Fasset
Dallas PD
High Risk Unit
“The bottom line is they do not consider
themselves to be exploited. They have been
having sex with adults, if not for cash then
for safety and a place to call home. They are
doing this day in and day out”.
Nikki Marr,
former DeKalb Juvenile Court Judge
“If they are really afraid of their pimp, they tell
us ‘You’ll never catch him. I’m not going to tell
you anything’, or ‘He’s been better to me than
my parents have been.’ It is very hard for us to
gain their trust. The main thing we are trying to
stress is ‘You are a victim. We are not here to
charge you. Whoever is doing this to you is
wrong for doing so.’ Our main focus is to try to
get her to trust us in order for us to get the
pimp.”
D.M. Williams, Sergeant
Atlanta (GA) PD
Medical (well child exam)
STD check & pregnancy exam
Dental
Psychological
Therapy
Women’s exam
Transgender often need additional support
Time to decide if they want to report and
work with Law Enforcement
A person who can advocate for them
Child Abuse Specialist
Child Forensic Interviewers
Housing – both emergency and long
term
Medical/Dental needs
Educational Specialist
System Advocate
Community Advocate
Transportation needs
Local Law Enforcement, Juvenile Justice,
Mental Health, Medical Providers, Social
Services and Child Protective Services are ill
equipped to deal with the complex and varied
services this population needs
BY THEMSELVES.
If you don’t have one, BUILD one
Advocates – do you know what questions Law
Enforcement will ask? Can you explain this to
the victim?
Law Enforcement – do you know what the
advocate’s job entails? Aware that encouraging
victims to think about working with the police is
part of that process?
AND WHAT ABOUT ALL THE OTHER SERVICE
PROVIDERS? HOW CAN THEY HELP?
NGOs
Advocacy groups
Local/State/Federal Law Enforcement
Support services
Health Care Professionals
Schools
CPS
Private Sector
Churches
Social Services
Make a Resource Tree
Reasons this agency is valuable to the
Coalition
Celebrate small successes in a BIG way.
Reflect:
What did we learn from this?
What will we do again?
What was lacking and how does the
Coalition address those needs?
In Texas almost all Commercially Exploited children
are not identified
There is a myth that it is not happening in our towns
Most people in social services who work with
runaway/homeless populations have probably met a
victim and don’t know it
The right questions are not asked
Most Commercial Sex trafficked children are
unidentified and in the correctional system or CPS
system
Need to know what they feel is natural
It’s OK if they want to go back
Need to have information
Legal
Educational
Psycho-educational
Disentangle the definitional maze
Dispel the myths
Give clear, “plain english” descriptors
Describe behaviors that are sexually harmful
to children
For each behavior, ask:
Who would the perpetrators be?
Who might protect the child?
Where might this behavior occur?
What do we need to know to prevent it?
Sex Trafficking
Brothels, street prostitution
Pornography
Exotic Dancing/strip clubs
Massage parlors
Escort Services
Modeling studios
Labor Trafficking
Farming/Agricultural
Landscaping/Construction
Hotel/tourist industry
Restaurant
Factory work
Domestic servitude
Panhandling
Selling Gangs
Mom & Pop Operations
These children need time
Locking them up and forcing them to stay
away from their pimp will NOT work
They MUST want to get out of the life
They will talk about going back
National
Human Trafficking
Hotline
1-888-3737-888
Central TX Coalition Against Human Trafficking
www.ctcaht.org
Houston Coalition Against Human Trafficking
www.cahthouston.org
Rescue and Restore Coalition – Houston
www.houstonrr.org
Mosaic Family Services- Dallas
www.mosaicservices.org
El Paso Human Trafficking Task Force
www.ci.el-paso.tx.us/police/human_trafficking.asp
Austin Police Department
Trafficking Unit
512-974-4786
http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/police/ht_unit.htm
ALLIES Against Human Slavery
http://alliesctx.wordpress.com/
What’s Your Response
http://whatsyourresponse.com/
Free the Slaves
www.freetheslaves.net
National Asian American Pacific Islander Women’s Forum
http://napawf.org/programs/human-trafficking
Health and Human Services
www.acf.hhs.gov/trafficking
Human Trafficking
www.humantrafficking.org
Office for Victims of Crime
www.ovc.gov/help/tip.htm
UN Office of Drugs & Crimes
www.unodc.org
U.S. Depart of State
www.usinfo.state.gov
U.S. Depart of Justice
www.usdoj.gov
Polaris Project
http://www.polarisproject.org/index.php
Boddy, S. (1998). John School Helps Break the Cycle of Prostitution. Peace and Environment News,
November 1998
Batsyukova, S. (2007).Prostitution and human trafficking for sexual exploitation. Gender Issues, 24, 4650.
Bullard, BO, Becky Owens Bullard Consulting www.beckyownesbullard.com
Flores, T. (2007). The Sacred Bath: An American Teen’s Story of Modern Day Slavery. iUniverse, New
York, New York.
Hunter, A. (2005). School for Johns. Village Voice, May 10, 2005.
Ledeaux,
Lisak, D. (2002
Lloyd, R. (2011). Girls Like Us. HarperCollins, NY, NY.
Macdonald, K. (2009). Human trafficking: a service provider’s guide to recognizing and assisting victims
of modern day slavery. Retrieved from http://www.nacsw.org
Palm, T. Marie Collins Foundation, webinar http://www.stopitnow.org 12/8/2011
Prieve, A., Suhr, C. (2005). Hidden in Plain View: The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Girls in Atlanta.
Atlanta’s Women Agenda. Atlanta, GA.
Polaris Project. Domestic Sex Trafficking: The Criminal Operations of the American Pimp. 2006.
www.polarisproject.org
Smith, L. A., Healy, S., and Snow, M. (2009). The National Report on Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking:
America’s Prostituted Children. Shared Hope International
Tenias De-Lopez, V. (2010) Domestic Teen Sex Trafficking. Center on Violence Against Women and
Children, Rutgers University.
Urbina, I. (2009) New York Time Article: Running in the Shadows. Retrieved from
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/26/us/26runaway.html
Det. Billy Sifuentes, retired, APD
Kirsten MacDermott, Lifeworks
Jordan Greenbaum, MD, Stephanie Blank Center for
Safe and Healthy Children, Children’s Healthcare of
Atlanta
Kim Kotrola, Ph.D
Members of the Central Texas Coalition Against
Human Trafficking
A VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO THE SURVIVORS
WHO SHARED THEIR STORIES
Wende Hilsenrod
Human Trafficking Specialist
Texas Association Against Sexual Assault
6200 La Calma suite 110
Austin, Texas 78752
[email protected]
512-474-7190 ext 14

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