MIECHV Presentation - Partner. Plan. Act.

Report
Illinois
MIECHV
March 12, 2013
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Today’s Outline
 Overview of Home Visiting and MIECHV in Illinois
 Background: federal MIECHV goals and requirements
Q&A
 Illinois MIECHV
 Past (timeline)
 Present (direct services and community systems)
 Future (building home visiting systems statewide)
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What is Home Visiting?
 A Home Visiting program uses trained home visitors
to provide direct services to pregnant women or
children from birth to age 5.
 Home Visiting services are free and voluntary.
 Home Visitors have received background checks as
well as extensive training in child development.
 Home Visitors share information about parent-child
interactions, and they model activities to stimulate
attachment and development.
 There are ~300 Home Visiting programs in Illinois.
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What is MIECHV?
 MIECHV = Maternal, Infant, & Early Childhood Home
Visiting program.
 MIECHV is a federally funded program, carried out by
states and community agencies.
 In Illinois 6 communities were funded, based on need,
and capacity of established home visiting programs
and existing early childhood collaborations.
 Englewood/West Englewood/ Greater Grand Crossing,
Cicero, Elgin, Rockford, Macon County, Vermilion
County.
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Overview of Illinois MIECHV HV Models
Model
Target Population
Healthy Families
America (HFA)
Families at risk of child abuse and
neglect (birth to 5)
Nurse Family
Partnership (NFP)
First-time low income moms,
ideally enrolled at 16-20 weeks (no
later than 28 wks) (through age 2)
Early Head Start (EHS) Low-income pregnant women and
- home based option
families with children from birth
through age 3
Parents As Teachers
(PAT)
Prenatal - 5 years
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Federal MIECHV Goals
 Strengthen
and improve Title V (maternal and
child health) programs.
 Improve coordination of services in at-risk
communities.
 Provide comprehensive home visiting services to
improve outcomes in at-risk communities.
 Increase intra-agency collaboration.
 Review evidence-based models.
 Conduct national evaluation (MIHOPE) for
Congress.
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Federal MIECHV Requirements
 Conduct needs assessments.
 Prioritize high risk populations.
 Use evidence-based home visiting models with
fidelity.
 Show improvement in mandated (required)
benchmark areas.
 Submit annual data reports.
 Demonstrate state maintenance of effort (same
level of funding) for home visiting programs.
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Federally-Recognized Evidence-Based Models
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Healthy Families
America
Child First
Early Head Start—
Home Based Option
Early Intervention
Program for Adolescent
Mothers
Family Check-Up
Healthy Steps
Parents as Teachers
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/
Home Instruction for
Parents of Preschool
Youngsters
Nurse Family
Partnership
Play and Learning
Strategies Infant
The Early Start (New
Zealand)
Oklahoma CommunityBased Family Resource and
Support Program
SafeCare Augmented
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Federally Mandated Benchmarks
1.
Improved maternal and newborn health*
2.
Reduced incidence of child maltreatment,
child injuries and ER visits*
3.
Increased school readiness and achievement
4.
Reduced domestic violence or crime*
5.
Improved family economic self-sufficiency
6.
Improved coordination and referrals for other
community resources and supports*
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Federal Program Requirements
 Appropriate oversight and administration
 Implementation plan, including a timeline
 State plan for Continuous Quality
Improvement (CQI) and use of data systems
 Voluntary services
 Partnerships and collaboration
Illinois
MIECHV
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Illinois MIECHV: The Past
 Needs assessments (September 2010)
 Updated State Plans (June 2011)
 FY 2011 Formula Applications (July 2011)
 FY 2012 Formula Awards (September 2012)
 Competitive (Research) Awards (July 2011)
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Illinois MIECHV Competitive Grant
 Three funded research projects:
 Doula Randomized Control Trial (University of
Chicago)
 Doula Expansion (Ounce of Prevention Fund)
 Fussy Baby Network Enhancement Training (Erikson
Institute and Chapin Hall)
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Illinois MIECHV Formula Grant
 Expand or enhance one or more evidence-based
models of home visiting
 Ensure that the home visiting program is
effectively connected to community based
organizations and services
 Establish a system of universal screening and
coordinated intake in target areas
 Enhance or establish an early childhood
collaborative in target areas
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HRSA Region V MIECHV
State
Home Visiting Models
Illinois
HFA, NFP, EHS, PAT
Indiana
HFA, NFP
Michigan
HFA, NFP, EHS
Minnesota
HFA, NFP
Ohio
HFA, NFP
Wisconsin
HFA, EHS, NFP
(Healthy Families America, Nurse Family
Partnership, Early Head Start- Home based
option, Parents As Teachers)
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Illinois MIECHV Formula Grants
 A collaboration is funded in 6 high-risk communities:
 Englewood, West Englewood, Greater Grand Crossing*
 Elgin*
 Rockford
 Cicero
 Macon County*
 Vermilion County*
 Roles within each collaboration:
 Home Visiting
 Coordinated Intake
 Community Systems Development
* These 4 communities are included in the national MIHOPE evaluation.
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Illinois Formula Grant Services include:







Mobile (animated DVD project)
Infant Mental Health Consultation
Linkages to Medical Homes (ICAAP)
4 P’s Plus screening (substance abuse, tobacco, depression)
Abriendo Puertas - Opening Doors (Latino parent engagement)
Learning Communities
Strong Foundations Training:
 Domestic Violence
 Substance Abuse
 Mental Health
 Parents with Special Needs
 Community Systems and Capacity Building
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Illinois MIECHV Community Systems:
 Community Systems Development staff in each community
 Collective Impact model
 Key components of systems development include:
 Operating structure
 Communication and trust; participatory meetings
 Comprehensive membership list
 Shared vision statement
 Inventory of community services
 Community needs assessment and strategic plan
 Joint activities
 Evaluation
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Constructs (Measures) for Benchmark #6:
Improved Coordination and Referrals
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Increase or maintain the proportion of families assessed for
primary medical care, basic needs, ATOD, DV, mental health,
behavioral health, child developmental delays, education,
employment, and housing within one year of enrollment.
Increase or maintain the proportion of families with
identified service needs who are referred to available services
within one month of receiving a positive screening.
An increase in the proportion of families referred for services that
complete the referral.
An increase in the number of community agencies with which the
home visiting provider has an identified contact person.
An increase in the number of community agencies with which the
home visiting provider has established formal MOUs for the
coordination of services and exchange of information.
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Illinois MIECHV At A Glance
 Between March 1st – September 30th, 2012 MIECHV




Coordinated Intake screened over 1,000 women.
Illinois MIECHV served 555 families.
The average age of pregnant and postpartum* women was
22.37 years old with a range of 13 to 45 years old.
15.5% of pregnant and post-partum* women were positive
for possible domestic violence.
22.5% of pregnant and post-partum* women were positive
for depressive symptoms.
*Postpartum is defined as 6 weeks post birth
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Illinois MIECHV: The Future
Incorporating Non-MIECHV Communities
 In MIECHV communities, we are working with non-
MIECHV home visiting partners to be part of
Coordinated Intake.
 We are looking for non-MIECHV communities who
will volunteer to incorporate Coordinated Intake into
their home visiting system .
 We are working to offer MIECHV trainings to nonMIECHV staff.
 We want to support non-MIECHV communities in
strengthening collaborations.
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For more information, please contact:
Joanna Su, M.S.W.
Manager of Community Systems and Capacity-Building
Governor’s Office of Early Childhood Development
(312) 814-6741
[email protected]
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