CSBG: ROMA Next Generation COE Update

Report
ROMA Next Generation Center of Excellence
Update and Listening Session
2013 NASCSP Annual Conference
Where We Are
2
• 12 National Webinars
• 6 Statewide and National Listening Sessions
• 1 National Survey
• 3 Iterations of the White Paper
• Framing of pilots
• Framing of case studies
• Engaging other federal programs
Where We’re Headed
3
• Release semi-final iteration of the White Paper
• Select sites for pilot and case studies
• Implement pilots and case studies
• Toolkit and training development
• Engage NASCSP Monitoring Workgroup
But, Before We Get There…
4
We Need STATE specific input
• What information do you wish you had on the
impact of CSBG?
• What will the proposed changes mean for your
monitoring and reporting responsibilities?
CREATING THE NEXT GENERATION
OF ROMA
5
ROMA Next Generation
6
1. Foster a performance culture in the Network
2. Create and implement a Theory of Change
process throughout the Network
3. Increase use of client demographic information
to contextualize indicators
4. Use a range of indicators to show progress
toward family level stability and self-sufficiency
ROMA Next Generation, cont.
7
5. Focus on a short list of indicators and outcomes to be used at
the federal level
6. Identify which outcomes (from existing and new) give the
information needed about core programs at local and state
levels (NOTE: Some will be required to be reported to the
national data collection system and others will not)
7. Generally reduce the number of items required to be
reported while preserving sufficient data to “tell the story.”
8. Make changes to the data collection system to allow for
quarterly reporting (GPRA Modernization) and multi year
reporting
ROMA Next Generation, cont.
8
9. Enhance ability of State CSBG Offices to monitor using
ROMA and Organizational Standards
10. Enhance ability of State CSBG Offices to work together
with State Community Action Associations, RPICs and
national partners to provide training and technical
assistance
11. Aim for full implementation of ROMA by all local
agencies, State CSBG Offices, and OCS
PROPOSED FAMILY LEVEL CHANGES
See White Paper, Section Three
9
The Big Questions
10
What’s your impact on the lives of individuals and families?
Are people better off as a result of Community Action
intervention?
What actually happened (what changed) to an individual or
family as a result of the services you provided?
If Community Action is about moving families to selfsufficiency, how many families have achieved selfsufficiency?
If families have not “moved” but have received services to
maintain or achieve family stability, how do you measure
this accomplishment?
What You’ve Told Us
11
• Our work is about stability and self-sufficiency.
• Flexibility in reporting should be maintained.
• A majority of agencies can provide an unduplicated count
of individuals served (according to two surveys).
• A majority of agencies can connect family outcomes with
the services they receive (both in number and frequency of
services and duration of service).
• Some of the current NPIs are meaningful and should
remain. Some are outputs, should also remain but be
separated from the outcomes.
• There are too many NPIs. However, we need a good
number and a range of indicators to enable us to tell our
story.
Defining Self-Sufficiency
12
Pathway to Self-Sufficiency
STEP THREE
STEP TWO
STEP ONE
The ability to meet family basic needs without public
or private assistance, and to have sufficient
discretionary income for savings and emergency
expenses.
The ability to meet family basic needs without public
or private assistance.
The ability to meet family basic needs.
Defining Self-Sufficiency, cont.
13
Basic Needs – housing, utilities/telephone, childcare,
food, transportation, health care, clothing and household
items, and taxes (minus federal and state tax credits).
Public Benefits – programs that limit assistance to
those with modest or low incomes/means tested
programs such as TANF, SSI, Food Stamps, Rental
Assistance, Energy Assistance
Sufficient Discretionary Income – ?
National ROMA Goals
14
ROMA GOAL ONE: People with low incomes
become more self-sufficient
ROMA GOAL SIX (REVISED): People with low
incomes, especially vulnerable populations,
become more stable.
Defining Self-Sufficiency, cont.
15
Pathway to Self-Sufficiency – Connecting the Dots
STEP THREE The ability to meet family basic needs
without public assistance, and to have
THRIVING
sufficient discretionary income for
savings and emergency expenses.
GOAL ONE
STEP TWO
The ability to meet the family’s basic
needs without public assistance.
GOAL ONE
The ability to meet the family’s basic
needs.
GOAL SIX
SAFE
STEP ONE
STABLE
Impact of Proposed NPI Updates
16
• Follow the progress of people who have increased their family
income
• Identify the number of people who have reduced reliance on public
assistance (because their income is sufficient to meet the needs
previously met by this assistance)
• Identify the number of people who have acquired public benefits to
enable them to meet family basic needs
• Identify the number of people who have gained skills that support
their movement toward stability or self sufficiency
• Identify the number of people who have gained assets or resources
that support their movement toward stability or self sufficiency
Proposed Family NPIs
17
GOAL ONE: People with low incomes become more
self-sufficient
Outcome 1: People with low incomes increase family
income as they move out of poverty.
The number of families who move up on the FPG scale
Outcome 2: People with low incomes decrease
reliance on cash assistance or public benefits.
The number of families who move to “Employment
Only” or “Employment & Other” from any other
income source category.
The number of families who report a decrease in
reliance on cash assistance or public benefits.
Proposed Family NPIs, cont.
18
Outcome 3: People with low incomes achieve improved status or
conditions in one of the following:
3.1a
3.1b
3.1c
3.2a
3.2b
3.3a
3.3b
3.4a
3.4b
EMPLOYMENT
Unemployed and obtained a job
Employed and improved employment benefits
Employed and maintained a job for at least 90 days
TRANSPORTATION
Obtained access to reliable transportation
Obtained a driver's license
HEALTH
Obtained health care services for themselves and/or family member
Secured health care insurance
HOUSING
Obtained safe and affordable housing
Maintained safe and affordable housing for 90 days
Proposed Family NPIs, cont.
19
INCOME MANAGEMENT & ASSET DEVELOPMENT
3.5a
Number and percent of participants demonstrating ability to complete and
maintain a budget for over 90 days
3.5b
Number and percent of participants in tax preparation programs who qualified
for any type of Federal or State tax credit and the expected aggregate dollar
amount of the credits
Number and percent of participants opening an Individual Development Account
(IDA) or other savings account
Number and percent of participants using savings or tax credits to acquire
physical (i.e. housing), developmental (i.e. education) or commercial (i.e. small
business) assets
Number and percent of participants who obtained court-ordered child support
payments and the expected annual aggregated dollar amount of payments
3.5c
3.5d
3.5e
Proposed Family NPIs, cont.
20
3.6a
3.6b
3.6c
3.7a
3.7b
3.7c
EDUCATION & TRAINING
Obtained skills/competencies required for employment
Completed ABE/GED and received certificate or diploma
Completed post-secondary education program and obtained
certificate or diploma
FAMILY DEVELOPMENT
Parents and other adults learn and exhibit improved parenting
skills
Parents and other adults learn and exhibit improved family
functioning skills
Children participate in pre-school activities to develop school
readiness skills
Proposed Family NPIs, cont.
21
Goal Six: People with low incomes, especially vulnerable
populations, become more stable
Outcome 4: People with low incomes secure cash assistance or
public benefits to stabilize family
The number of families who report receipt of new benefits to
stabilize the family.
The number of families who move from "no income" to another
income category.
The number and percent of participants who were enrolled in
telephone lifeline initiatives.
The number and percent of participants who secured energy
discounts.
Proposed Family NPIs, cont.
22
Outcome 5: People with low incomes facing an emergency or disaster
achieve stability due to tangible assistance.
ALTERNATE LANGUAGE: People secure assistance to meet needs which are
the result of disaster or emergency situation OR People with low income
secure assistance to meet recurring need.
5.1a
5.1b
5.1c
5.1d
5.1e
Emergency Food
Emergency fuel or utility payments funded by LIHEAP or other public
and private funding sources
Emergency Rent or Mortgage Assistance
Emergency Temporary Shelter
Other Emergency
Proposed Family NPIs, cont.
23
Outcome 6: People with low incomes received services to become
or maintain family stability
6.1a Rides Provided
6.1b Information and Referral Services
6.1c Enrolled children in before and after school programs
6.1d Obtained care for child or dependent
Outcome 7: Vulnerable populations maintain their independence
7.1a Seniors are able to remain independent
7.1b Individuals with disabilities remain independent
Additional Family Level Reporting Questions
24
• Should we make better use of scales and matrices?
• If yes, how do we standardize these tools while still
allowing for community flexibility to modify
benchmark language?
• If yes, how might the use of scale and matrices
impact reporting?
• Do we need separate scales/indicators for youth
and senior citizens?
25
Proposed Community Level Changes
See White Paper, Section Four
The Big Questions
26
What’s your impact on communities?
Are communities better off as a result of
Community Action intervention?
What actually happened (what changed) to the
community as a result of the services you provided?
Are you a part of “collective action” with partners in
your community?
What evidence do you have to prove your part in
the community level success?
What You’ve Told Us
27
• Community Action is about helping maintain or
regain community vitality.
• We know that family success is inter-related with
community success.
• Community work takes collaboration and
development of different kinds of resources.
• Community work is difficult and it often takes
multiple years to achieve a single outcome.
• We’d like to do more community work.
Defining Revitalized Communities
28
Revitalized communities enable everyone to meet their
own basic needs.
These communities provide opportunities for all
individuals to be engaged and to achieve their personal
goals.
Revitalized communities are healthy, safe and resilient in
times of change.
Revitalized communities foster a sense of shared purpose
and generate a sense of meaningful engagement.
National ROMA Goals
29
ROMA GOAL 2: The conditions in which people
with low incomes live are improved
ROMA GOAL 3: People with low incomes own a
stake in their community
ROMA GOAL 4: Partnerships among supporters
and providers of services to people with low
incomes are achieved
Defining Revitalized Communities, cont.
30
Pathway to Revitalized Communities – Connecting the Dots
STEP FOUR
THRIVING
STEP THREE
SAFE
STEP TWO
SAFE
STEP ONE
STABLE
Revitalized communities are healthy, safe
and resilient in times of change.
GOAL TWO
Revitalized communities provide
opportunities for all individuals to be
engaged and to achieve their personal
goals.
GOAL THREE
Revitalized communities foster a sense of
shared purpose and generate a sense of
meaningful engagement.
GOAL FOUR
Revitalized communities enable everyone
to meet their own basic needs.
GOAL TWO
What Should be Measured?
31
We discussed proposed changes to community level NPIs
which included elements from the following sources:
• Promise Neighborhoods
• The Opportunity Index
• The Partnership for Sustainable Communities
• The National Core Indicators
Proposed Community NPIs
32
Goal Two: The conditions in which people with low incomes live are improved
Outcome 8: Community Action joins with other community stakeholders to improve or create the
following assets in neighborhoods with low incomes:
8.1
8.1a
DEVELOPMENTAL ASSETS – These are assets that allow residents to attain the skills needed
to be successful in all aspects of daily life (e.g., educational institutions, early learning
centers, and health resources).
Accessible and affordable health care services/facilities created
8.1b
Accessible and affordable health care services/facilities saved from reduction or elimination
8.1c
Accessible safe and affordable child care or child development placement opportunities
created
8.1d
Accessible safe and affordable child care or child development placement opportunities
saved from reduction or elimination
8.1e
Accessible before-school and after-school program placement opportunities created
8.1f
Accessible before-school and after-school program placement opportunities saved from
reduction or elimination
Proposed Community NPIs, cont.
33
8.1g
Accessible educational and training placement opportunities created, including vocational,
literacy, and life skill training, ABE/GED, and post-secondary education
8.1h
Accessible educational and training placement opportunities saved from reduction or
elimination, including vocational, literacy, and life skill training, ABE/GED, and postsecondary education
8.2
COMMERCIAL ASSETS – These assets are associated with production, employment,
transactions, and sales (e.g., labor force and retail establishments).
8.2a
Increase in the availability of commercial services within low-income neighborhoods
8.2b
Preservation of commercial services within low-income neighborhoods
8.3
RECREATIONAL ASSETS –These assets create value in a neighborhood beyond work and
education (e.g., parks, open space, community gardens, and arts organizations).
8.3a
Increase in the availability of community facilities
8.3b
Preservation of community facilities
8.3c
Increase in neighborhood quality-of-life resources
8.3d
Preservation of neighborhood quality-of-life resources
Proposed Community NPIs, cont.
34
8.4
PHYSICAL ASSETS - These assets are associated with the built environment and physical
infrastructure (e.g., housing, commercial buildings, and roads).
8.4a
Safe and affordable housing units created in the community
8.4b
Safe and affordable housing units improved in the community through construction,
weatherization or rehabilitation achieved by Community Action activity or advocacy
8.4c
Accessible new transportation resources, including public or private transportation
8.4d
Accessible expanded transportation resources, including public or private transportation
8.4e
Accessible transportation resources saved from reduction or elimination, including public or
private transportation
8.5
SOCIAL ASSETS - These assets establish well-functioning social interactions (e.g., public
safety).
8.5a
Increase in the availability of community services to improve public health and safety
8.5b
Preservation of community services to improve public health and safety
Proposed Community NPIs, cont.
35
Goal Four: Partnerships among supporters and providers of services to
people with low incomes are achieved
Outcome 9: Community services and resources are accessible and affordable for
populations with low incomes or other barrier
9.1a
Number of organizations, both public and private, that Community Action
actively works with to expand resources and opportunities in order to
achieve family and community outcomes
9.1b
Number of volunteer hours donated to the agency by the public
Proposed Community NPIs, cont.
36
Goal Three: People with low incomes own a stake in their community
Outcome 10: People with low incomes are connected to community networks and improve
their social capital
10.1
Community empowerment through maximum feasible participation
10.1a
Number of volunteer hours donated to the agency by Community Action program
participants
10.1b
Number of low-income people participating in formal community organizations,
government, boards or councils that provide input to decision-making and policy
setting through Community Action efforts
10.1c
Number of low-income people engaged in non-governance community activities or
groups created or supported by Community Action
Proposed Community NPIs, cont.
• Collective Impact Narrative
– Community Intervention Title
– Counties Served
– Target Population
– Shared Measurement System
• Gather baseline data
• Increase awareness and activity
37
PROPOSED CHANGES FOR REPORTING
THE USE OF CSBG DOLLARS
See White Paper, Section Five
38
Refining Service Categories
39
FY11 CSBG Expenditures by Service Categories
Health
4%
Self Sufficiency
17%
Other
2%
Employment
12%
Education
11%
Income Management
6%
Linkages
14%
Housing
8%
Nutrition
7%
Emergency Services
19%
Refining Service Categories
40
We must better define the following
categories:
• Emergency Services
• Self-Sufficiency
• Linkages
Refining Service Categories, cont.
41
Emergency Services – This would capture the
work of Community Action to respond to family
emergencies. It would include such things as
emergency fuel assistance and rent assistance
(Outcome 5).
Disaster Relief – This would capture the work of
Community Action preparing for and during
disasters. It would reflect community level work. As
such, it would not be about people with low
incomes only.
Refining Service Categories, cont.
42
Self-Sufficiency – This would capture the work of
Community Action’s direct case management work.
It would also capture Community Action’s formal
family development/self-sufficiency programs that
provide a continuum of assistance (Outcomes 1-3).
Linkages – This would capture the work of
Community Action around partnership and
coalition building (Outcomes 8-9)
Refining Service Categories, cont.
43
•
Addition of an Organizational Capacity Building category 








Community Assessment
Data and Analysis
Strategic Planning
Community Engagement
Consumer Input
Leadership
Governance
HR
Fiscal
•
High level reporting or is the above level of detail beneficial?
•
Direct versus capacity building services
Refining Service Categories, cont.
44
Reporting of use of CSBG for “Administration”
• Administration is not a separate category in Section E,
but is included in the service category with which it is
related. Should it be separate?
• Some agencies “back fill” indirect costs for programs
that do not have ability to pay full rate. How is this
captured?
• Proposed use of CSBG dollars to support improvement
in Organizational Standards areas (most of which are
administrative) will increase percent of funds spent on
admin (see next slide). Is this to be expected?
Refining Service Categories, cont.
45
1.
Health
2.
Employment
3.
Education
4.
Income Management/Asset Development
5.
Housing
6.
Emergency Services
7.
Disaster Relief
8.
Nutrition
9.
Linkages
10. Self-Sufficiency
11. Organizational Capacity Building
Connecting CSBG Dollars to the NPIs
46
• Linking CSBG dollars to direct services; use
the categories other than organizational
capacity; connecting CSBG with the
outcomes achieved
• Some states are already doing this
Connecting CSBG Dollars to Other Funding
47
Leveraging: How do we demonstrate the
uniqueness that is produced by leveraging CSBG
dollars to secure other funding to address our
mission?
Comparison of Section E categories with
reporting of all funding info in Section F
Connecting CSBG Dollars to Other Funding, cont.
48
One suggestion is to take the information from
Section F and create a graph similar to the one
we have of Section E
(See example on next slide)
Connecting CSBG Dollars to Other Funding, cont.
49
FY11 Section F Allocations
FY11 Section E Service Categories
Health
4%
Other
2%
Employment
12%
Self Sufficiency
17%
Employment
3%
Other
20%
Education
28%
Education
11%
Health
4%
Income
Management
6%
Linkages
14%
Self
Sufficiency
11%
Income
Management
0%
Housing
8%
Nutrition
7%
Emergency
Services
19%
Linkages
3%
Nutrition
8%
Emergency
Services
2%
Housing
21%
Connecting CSBG Dollars to Other Funding, cont.
50
Would your state be able to add a column on
Section F and ask reporters to identify how
much CSBG funding was used to supplement
that resource?
(See example on next slide)
Connecting CSBG Dollars to Other Funding, cont.
51
DRAFT NATIONAL COMMUNITY
ACTION THEORY OF CHANGE (TOC)
See White Paper, Section One, Appendix A
52
Current Structural TOC
53
Creating a Programmatic TOC
54
Family SelfSufficiency
Assumptions
Theories of Poverty
Interventions
Service Strategies
Indicators
Intermediate
Goals or
Milestones
Revitalized
Communities
Long-term Goals
DRAFT Programmatic TOC Assumptions
55
The theories of poverty and beliefs Community Action bases is work on...
• Poverty Caused by Individual Deficiencies
• Poverty Caused by Cultural Belief System Supportive of Subcultures of
Poverty
• Poverty Caused by Economic, Political and Social Distortions
• Poverty Caused by Geographical Disparities
• Poverty Caused by Cumulative Cyclical Interdependencies
• Poverty Caused by a Lack of Social Capital
• Poverty Caused by a Lack of Public Investment in key areas such as
education and healthcare
• Movement out of poverty is impeded by crisis and a lack of stability
• Anti-poverty interventions are most successful when the target audience
is included in shaping the intervention
• Anti-poverty interventions are most successful when grounded in a local
community needs assessment
DRAFT Programmatic TOC Interventions
56
The approach Community Action uses to reach its long-term
goals...
• Community Action designs a range of “light touch” single
service interventions and “deep touch” intensive,
comprehensive and bundled service interventions to
move families toward self-sufficiency and communities
toward revitalization.
• Community Actions “light touch” and “deep touch”
service interventions cover the nine CSBG Service
Categories included in the CSBG Statute (employment,
education, income management, housing, emergency
service, nutrition, linkages, self-sufficiency and health).
DRAFT Programmatic TOC Indicators
57
• The indicators to Community Action’s
long-term goals are really intermediate
goals or major milestones. These would
be the NPIs.
Next Steps
58
• Engage Committees
• Update White Paper
• Pilot Reporting Changes
• Case Studies of Bundled Services
For more information, visit:
www.roma1.org
Tabitha Beck, Project Lead, [email protected]
Barbara Mooney, [email protected]
Gretchen Knowlton, [email protected]
Jovita Tolbert, [email protected]
Mary Virtue, [email protected]

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