Simple, Compound, Complex Sentences

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Simple, Compound,
Complex Sentences
Review Quiz
The Rules

A simple sentence consists of one
independent clause. An independent
clause contains a subject and a predicate
and expresses a complete thought.
– During the game, Jasmine scored 23 points,
had 6 assists, 8 rebounds, and 2 blocked
shots.
– Tim is a really good pitcher and hitter.
Simple Sentence
It can have a FANBOYS in it; just check to
see if what comes both before and after
the FANBOYS are complete sentences. If
they are, it can’t be a simple sentence.
 It can have a comma in it with a series,
some interrupting information offset by
two commas, or an introductory
prepositional phrase with a comma.
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The Rules
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A compound sentence consists of two
or more independent clauses that are
connected by a comma and a coordinating
conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet,
so)—or a semicolon instead of FANBOYS
– I like to be very active in my life, and my
favorite sports are football, basketball,
baseball, soccer, and hockey.
Compound Sentences
They have two complete sentences that
can stand on their own as two
independent clauses
 The key is to find one of the FANBOYS
with a comma before it and a complete
sentence on both sides of the FANBOYS.
 It may also be identified by having a semicolon without FANBOYS joining the two
sentences.
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The Rules

A complex sentence consists of an
independent clause and one or more
dependent clauses. Using a subordinating
conjunction (because, although, if, etc.)
creates a dependent clause. Using a
relative pronoun (who, whom, that, or
which) creates a dependent clause.
– I would really love my English class if we
didn’t have to do so much writing.
Complex Sentences
These also consist of more than one
clause: a dependent and an independent.
 The key is to find the subordinating
conjunction in the sentence which is either
at the beginning with a comma in the
middle of the sentence before the
independent clause, or in the middle with
no comma and an independent clause at
the beginning of the complex sentence.
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Subordinating Conjunctions
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After, although, as, as far as, as if, as long
as, as soon as, as though
Because, before, besides
Even though, even if, ever since
If, in order that
Since, so that
Than, that, though
Unless, upon, until
When, whenever, where, wherever,
whether, while
ABE IS TUW
What kind of sentence is below?

Ever since I started the 7th grade at
Granite Oaks Middle School, I have
changed so much as a person.
Answer

It is a Complex sentence because “ever
since” serves as a subordinating
conjunction that connects the introductory
dependent clause to the independent
clause.
What kind of sentence is below?

I like pizza, chicken wings, and
cheerleaders very much!
Answer

It is a Simple sentence because even
though it has the coordinating conjunction
“and” in it, there is not a complete
sentence after the word “and.”
What kind of sentence is below?

I don’t know why people sometimes run
into poles, but those who do so are really
embarrassed.
Answer

It is a Compound sentence because the
coordinating conjunction “but” connects
two independent clauses.
What kind of sentence is below?

I would love to give everyone an A for all
their work; however, it would take
everyone to do all of their work and their
best work.
Answer

It is a compound sentence because the
semicolon “;” connects the two
independent clauses.
What kind of sentence is below?

I especially like Mr. Victor’s class after we
get to leave his room.
Answer

It is a Complex sentence because the
subordinating conjunction in the middle of
the sentence “after” joins the dependent
clause with the introductory independent
clause.
What kind of sentence is below?

I would like to play football, basketball,
baseball, softball, soccer, or just about
any other sport as well.
Answer

It is a Simple sentence because even
though it has commas in it, the items are
just a list. Plus, even though it has a
FANBOYS in it, what follows the “or” is not
a complete sentence.

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