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ENGAGING STUDENTS IN
LEARNING
Conversations about Teaching and
Learning
Diane Salter
Vice Provost Teaching and Learning
KPU
Dec. 10, 2013
What was your best learning experience????
What are these people doing ?
Hello
Are
you
Heartrate
Bligh, 2000; Bonwell & Eison, 1999; Hartley & Davies,
1978.
Heart Rates in Uninterrupted Lectures
Bligh, 2000; Bonwell & Eison, 1999; Hartley & Davies, 1978.
Why plan for ‘Active’ Lectures?
Problem of Attention span
Psychological constraints on learning:
Concentration drops with sustained and unchanging low level
activity (such as sitting and listening). To follow lecture
content concentrated effort is required.
Students attention is typically maintained for
????
__________ minutes.
Lecture Breaks Increase Students’ Attention
Bligh, 2000; McKeachy, 1999.
6
Bligh, D.A. 2000. Factors Affecting Student’s Attention.
In: What’s the use of Lectures? San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass Publishers,
2000. p.51.
Effect of intervention and discussion on attention decline during lecture.
McKeachy, W.J.
Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research and Theories for College and
University Teachers. (10th Edition). Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999.
Discussion methods are superior to lectures in students’
retention of information at the end of the course, transfer of
knowledge to new situations, development of problem
solving.
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Comparing Lectures to Discussions
(Pascarella & Terenzini, 1991, review of 17 studies)
Lectures = Discussions Learning Low Level Factual Material
Discussions > Lecture
Retention of Information
Transfer of Knowledge to New Situations
Motivate students to learn more
Challenging assumptions: Biggs and Tang
(2007) suggest:
Stop thinking about the next lecture that we
have to give, and start considering how to create
‘situations for student learning’.
(within the class time as well as out of class )
Shift the focus from ‘how do I teach this’ to ‘what
should the student to do to ‘learn this’.
Stop assuming that all learning takes place within
a teacher-directed classroom.
Teaching for Quality Learning at University, Third Edition.
John Biggs and Catherine Tang
Open University Press, New York, 2007.
Challenging assumptions:
Biggs and Tang (2007) suggest a shift :
From
To
Coverage mode
Assignment/Task Centred Mode
What am I going to teach?
What do I want the students to learn?
I must cover …
They must do…
Teaching Tasks
Learning Tasks
Monologue
Dialogue
Teach content
assess for mastery
Engagement with content/class as
dialogue/assess for deep learning
Typical University Lecture Hall
Traditional Didactic Approach
Assumption: My job is to talk. Your role is to listen.
PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF YOU FINISH FIRST!
The Old Britannia School House, Ontario
Smaller Classes are not immune to the
didactic approach!!
Strategies to Engage
Which have you used?
Which might you use?
p. 3, 4
16
THANK YOU!

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