Presentation slides

Report
How to design a
scalable flipped
classroom
A/Professor Carl Reidsema
Dr Abelardo Pardo
Workshop Outline
• 1st hour - Whole Systems Design
• Break (30 mins)
• 2nd hour - Implementation Issues
Opening the conversation …
Your thoughts +
Our experiences +
Context considerations
=
Next steps/ further
conversations
A definition – perhaps too tight?
The flipped classroom describes a reversal of
traditional teaching where students gain first exposure
to new material outside of class, usually via reading or
lecture videos, and then class time is used to do the
harder work of assimilating that knowledge through
strategies such as problem-solving, discussion or
debates.
(Vanderbilt University, Centre for Teaching/TEDI).
Question
Why would YOU want to deploy a Flipped Classroom?
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Correct misconceptions
Increase conceptual depth
Integrate depth with breadth
Improve on-campus engagement in learning
Reallocation of staff to high value tasks?
Taking advantage of online learning resources
Why?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/joefruchey/4304930267
Paradigm changes
Roles and expectations:
– Students MUST take responsibility: Ownership of
learning
– Teachers MUST take facilitation roles
And there’s a narrative that evolves out of this – a shared
meaning/ relevance
Questions
What are the implications of:
1. Changing expectations of students
2. Changing roles of staff
3. Building on the online resources in class
a. Concept exploration
b. Demonstration/ Application
c. Meaning making
Flipped Classroom
Design Considerations
People-Spaces-Tools
Design
CONTEXT
CURRICULUM
FLIP
Course
NARRATIVE
Content
Learning Objectives
Activities
Assessment
Communication
EVALUATION
1. Learning
Outcomes
2. Shared
understanding
3. Ownership of
learning
Course
DRIVERS:
• Institution/ Management
• Academics/ Students
• Industry
• Technology
• Global trends
CURRICULUM
Measure
Red Hat Conversation
Do you feel daunted/ pressured/ excited at the
prospect of flipping your classroom?
Workshop Approach to Engage Staff
So who did the pre-work?
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It takes more time than you think.
Use other people’s stuff.
Expect push-back from students.
Keep your options open.
Have a plan for your extra class time – that’s
the point!
John Sowash: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JPdGlyt6gg
Key Aspects from the Podcasts
Aspects to apply to
your context
Key Aspects
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Upfront planning/design takes time and thought
Complex systems approach
Ownership of Learning
Importance of Context
Importance of Narrative
Putting content online is only
a small part
Let’s map your context (10 mins)
Institutional Context
Course Design/ Delivery
Instructor Characteristics
Student Characteristics
The institutional factors
affecting the way that the
course is implemented:
The topic focus, resources, and,
technology used
The experience and attitudes of
the instructor
Experiences, expectations and
attitudes of the students
• type of institution;
• institutional values; and
• Reputation
How content is delivered (read/
watch – discuss/ create –
explore/ evaluate)
Cohort size and diversity
Level of prior knowledge
Learner granularity (individual,
group, team)
Community Expectations
Learning Objectives
Instructor Motivation
Student Motivation
The expectations of evaluators:
What changes in student
knowledge and skills are
expected
The support and rewards
available to the instructor
The kinds and levels of effort
and interest that students put
into the course
• accrediting bodies,
• industry,
• funding bodies etc.
Level of ownership
Rewards for doing well
Curriculum Context
Assessment
Teacher Behaviours
Student Behaviours
Factors affecting the status,
purpose and perceptions of the
course within its program
context
Nature and weightings of
assessment tasks, and the
nature of the criteria (recall –
synthesise – create)
Teacher decisions, attitudes,
and interactions (sage on stage
– guide on side – co-traveller)
The nature and amount of
student participation in the
course including how much
they focus on topics, processes,
and products
Student support – tutors, email
response etc.
ENGG1200 – Engineering Modelling and Problem Solving– Semester 2, Year 1
Institutional Context
Course Design/ Delivery
Instructor Characteristics
Student Characteristics
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Public funded/research intensive
Ranked 2nd (Australia) and in the
top 100 internationally
100 years old
Recent edX member
1200 students enrolled annually in
engineering
Teaching Focused (TF) academic
program
Strong but informal SOTL strength
in engineering and science
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Engineering Modelling and
Problem Solving through authentic
team based major design/build
projects
Flipped Class mode with
engineering materials concepts
delivered through online videos
Entirely active learning/no lectures
Balanced individual/team learning
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Professorial leadership with
extensive industry experience
Award winning TF academics
Learner/student focused
Change agents
Project leaders and tutors carefully
selected – enthusiasm, desire to
work with first years, ability to
challenge students
Teaching team ~40
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100% transfer from ENGG1100
with similar demographics
Multiple engineering disciplines
Mix of engineering statics, thermo,
electrical fundamentals
Mix of 1st year maths ability
Improved social networks
Improved conceptions of degree
major
Community Expectations
Learning Objectives
Instructor Motivation
Student Motivation
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Engineers Australia (EA)
Emphasis on theory-practice,
critical thinking, engineering ability
Grow Industry funding through
student project sponsorship
(Boeing, ABB, Barnes Foundation
etc.);
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Appreciation of
mathematical/virtual/physical
modelling
Application of engineering
materials behaviour in design
Demonstrated ownership of
learning
Reflective writing for design
thinking and planning
Effective team skills
Use of design process
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Largely intrinsic rewards for degree
of effort
High probability of promotion
through change leadership
Opportunity to engage in research
around design learning and
transformational change
High degree of ownership but
significant teaching team
autonomy
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Still predominantly strategic
learners
Strong desire for authentic
learning and experiences
Seeking relevance
Developing levels of ownership
and identity
Critical team players
Curriculum Context
Assessment
Teacher Behaviours
Student Behaviours
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• Emphasis on teaching as
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Course Evaluation results
EA commendation
Academic conceptions of technical
rigour
Industry recognition
National awards received
Balance research intensive image
with real world authentic learning
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Varied assessment types
Online MCQ/written reflections
Team design reports
Structured activity templates
Demonstration of final designed
product performance
Team peer review
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facilitation and coaching
Emphasis on experiential learning
Extensive use of PG/UG tutors
Extensive use of
Facebook/email/LMS
communication modes
Strong emphasis on developing
student’s agency
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Predominantly strongly motivated
Mixed cohort of epistemological
developmental levels (3-4 Perry)
Accepting of challenges
Struggle with teaching vs learning
High degree of participation
Black Hat Conversation
What are the immediate obstacles?
What are the long-term problems?
Write on sticky notes and then categorise
(make new category if necessary): 5 mins
Let’s take a break
Gradual Strategy
People
Spaces
Technology
[email protected]/4905173357/
Sustainable FC Implementation
People
[email protected]/4905173357/
Sustainable FC Implementation
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Take ownership of their learning
Clearly informed of expectations
Additional scaffolding required
Detailed feedback on progress
http://www.flickr.com/photos/joefruchey/4304930267
People - Students
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Institutional support to active learning
Clear vision of how to deploy FC
Transition from traditional lectures
Suggest gradual approach
Promote best practices (projects, grants)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/joefruchey/4304930267
People - Instructors
Anticipate obstacles
• More time
• Useful?
• Not an improvement
http://www.flickr.com/photos/hisgett/6940877193
People - Instructors
Empower people
People
Vision
Experts
Project
leaders
E-Learning
Student - driven
http:[email protected]/8222922317
People - Instructors
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicmcphee/279625345/
People - Instructors
Learning by doing
People - Others
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Admin support
Tech support
Professional development team
http://www.flickr.com/photos/joefruchey/4304930267
What is the #1 action for your “people”?
[email protected]/4905173357/
Spaces
http://www.flickr.com/photos/pahudson/5514887224/
Spaces to prepare
Spaces to interact
Be creative: Find spaces
Be creative: Find spaces
Spaces to interact
Outdoors?
Old spaces, new activities
http://www.flickr.com/photos/joefruchey/4304930267
What is the #1 action regarding spaces?
Technology
[email protected]/4905173357/
Sustainable FC Implementation
Use technology
To bind together …
… for content …
http://www.ozteacher.com.au/technology/technology-in-schools/cheat-sheet-a-beginners-guide-totutorial-videos-and-screencasting/25038
communication
and management.
• Createams – purposeful team selection
• WebPA – peer assessment
• Teamwork in Action – team training
ALL LINKED TO BLACKBOARD – our
institutional LMS
http://www.flickr.com/photos/joefruchey/4304930267
What is the #1 technological action?
So returning to …
People-Spaces-Tools
Design
CONTEXT
CURRICULUM
FLIP
Course
NARRATIVE
Content
Learning Objectives
Activities
Assessment
Communication
EVALUATION
1. Learning
Outcomes
2. Shared
understanding
3. Ownership of
learning
Course
DRIVERS:
• Institution/ Management
• Academics/ Students
• Industry
• Technology
• Global trends
CURRICULUM
Measure
Yellow Hat Conversation
Where to next?
What are the opportunities?
How will this all get done?
Thank you!
Example: Designing a new course
Concept Mapping of Engineering Materials
– What students need to know
– What students need to do (to demonstrate attainment)
Example: a template session
Start with learning outcomes …
Example: a
practical session
Example: Owning Learning through
reflection
R1: What are your goals?
R2: Project Management
R3: Check your theory
R4: Modelling
R5: Goal Check
Example – University of Sydney
• ELEC1601 Fundamentals of Computer Systems
• First year, second semester Engineering
• Enrollment: ≈300 students.
Sessions with Previous and in-class activities
Clear statement of that is needed
Videos to support
activities
MCQ to guarantee
engagement
Report engagement
to staff

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