a TREE IS GROWING

Report
Lesson 13 Day 1
Question of the Day
• What does your body need in order
to stay healthy and keep growing?
• In order to stay healthy and keep
growing, I need _______.
Read Aloud
• Listen to the poem to find out how the poet feels about fall.
Autumn
Why might we
I lie on my back and look up to see
reread a
A towering giant way above me.
poem?
Drifting down from branches tall,
Bright colored leaves begin to fall.
Very soon the tree is bare,
Cold but swaying in autumn air.
And though this tree seems dead today,
It will bloom again, one fine spring day.
• What does the poet mean by “And though this tree seems dead today”?
• How do you think the poet feels about autumn?
T221
Phonics
• ice
ace
edge
age
• Notice that the letters c and g are followed by the
letter e.
• What sound does the c stand for in these words?
• /s/
• What sound does the g stand for in these words?
• /j/
Phonics
ice
ace
edge
age
dice
face
hedge
cage
mice
lace
ledge
page
nice
pace
wedge
rage
rice
race
dredge
sage
vice
place
pledge
wage
price
space
slice
brace
spice
trace
twice
Notice that the letters c and g are followed by the letter e.
stage
Phonics
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
police
office
refrigerator
imagine
celery
ceiling
margin
difference
Notice what letter follows the letters c &g.
Find the words in the following sentences with the soft c & g sound.
The prince ate a bowl of rice.
prince rice
Do not write in the margin of the page.
margin
page
Take my advice and do not glance away from the road.
advice glance
Please slice a wedge of cheese for me.
slice wedge
Fluency: Intonation
• When good readers read nonfiction aloud, their voice expresses the
feeling of the passage. They change the pitch or intonation of their
voice, making it go high and low when reading words and phrases
that need emphasis. They also use end marks as clues for reading
particular words and sentences.
• When you read nonfiction try to make your voice go up and down,
depending on:
• how important words are
• end marks and other punctuation
• Open your book to page 388 and listen as I read. I notice that the
first sentence is about fifty thousand acorns. That’s a lot from one
tree, so I will emphasize the words fifty thousand by raising my
voice slightly.
• Turn to your partner and practice reading using intonation on page
388.
Author’s Purpose
• Authors write something to entertain, inform,
or to persuade. Sometimes, a writer might
want to entertain readers while also informing
them.
• In “A Tree is Growing” the main message is
what trees are like and how they grow and
change during the year. The author wants to
inform readers about trees.
Author’s Purpose
• Turn to pg. 379 and look at the first paragraph.
• Look for facts and details and jot them down on a sticky note.
These should help you find the author’s purpose.
• Roots hold the tree in place, roots are like pipelines, roots absorb
water and carry it to the tree.
• The author’s purpose is to tell what roots are and what they do.
• Now look ate page 380.
• Bark is the skin of a tree and the outer layer of bark protects the
tree
• The author’s purpose is to tell what bark is and what is does.
• Try on page 383.
• Cambium is a layer of growing bark.
• The author’s purpose is to tell what bark is made of.
Non-fiction Text Features: Graphic Aids
• There are many kinds of graphic aids that help readers
understand the text.
• Photographs, captions, bolded print, highlighted text,
maps, drawings, titles, sub-titles, charts, graphs and
diagrams
• Look at page 382 and look at this graphic aid or N-F
text feature.
• What can you see if you slice through the tree trunk?
• growth rings
• Where does cambium appear in the tree trunk?
• between phloem and xylem
Non-Fiction Text Features: Graphic
Aids turn to pg. 384-385
• Read and study over pg. 384-385.
• What is spread across these pages?
• A tree at different stages, beginning at 10 years of age and going up to
200 years
• What animal is shown in front of the 30-year-old tree?
• A wild turkey
• At what ages is the tree on page 385?
• 50 and 200
• How are the changes shown as the tree gets older?
• The tree gets taller and thicker.
• What doesn’t change as the trees get older?
• The marked point that is about as high as the turkey’s head doesn’t
change.
• What does the graphic aid help you understand?
• That the top, not the rest of a tree, grows taller
•
•
•
•
•
This is a news
feature. A
news feature
in nonfiction,
tells about
current events
or interesting
topics, and is
found in a
newspaper.
A news
feature may
include:
a headline
with the title
of the article
a first
paragraph
that tells what
the article is
about.
One purpose
for reading a
news feature
is to gain
information.
What can you see if you slice
through the tree trunk?
growth ring
Where does cambium appear I
the tree trunk?
between phloem and xylem
These are graphic aids.
Why do you think the author calls the bristlecone
trees “survivors”?
because they are able to live where most other
trees could not
How do you think the author feels about
bristlecone pine trees? How can you tell?
She admires them; she says that the ancient trees
have stories to tell.
How can you tell that “Ancient Trees Survive” is a
news feature?
It has a headline. The first paragraph tells what the
article will be about.
Paired Selection pg. 396-399
• What do you think the author
calls the bristlecone trees
“survivors”?
• Because they live where most
other trees could not
• How do you think the author
feels about bristlecone pine
trees? How can you tell?
• She admires them; she says that
the ancient trees have stories to
tell.
• How can you tell that ”Ancient
Trees Survive” is a news feature?
• It has a headline. The first
paragraph tells what the article
will be about.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1. Text to text
Like:
Needs sunlight, has bark, lives long
2. text to self
3. text to world
Other plants and animals use parts
of the tree as food or as a source of
water.
1. Text to text
Different:
Has needles instead of leaves, can
grow with little water, soil, or
warmth, much older than the oak.
Robust Vocabulary
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
tugged
If you tugged at the branch of a tree,
what might happen?
paused
Why might a teacher pause in the
middle of speaking to a class?
scavenger
What kind of animal do you know of
that is a scavenger?
self-sufficient
In what ways are you self-sufficient?
absorb
What can a towel absorb?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
columns
If you built a tree house, would you
want columns on the front?
particles
Imagine that you find particles of
crackers on the kitchen floor. What
might have happened?
dissolve
Do you think sugar will dissolve in
water?
protects
How can you protect yourself from
sunburn?
rustling
When would it be pleasant to hear a
rustling noise?
Grammar: Subject and Object
Pronouns
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Think of pronouns we have learned so far.
I, me, you, he, him, she, her, it, we, us, they, them
Mrs. West wrote a sentence on the board.
I -subject
The class read the sentence back to Mrs. West.
Me- object
When you refer to yourself as part of a group
always name yourself last.
My friends and _____ walked home.
I - subject
The teacher called on Jack and ________.
Me - object
DOL
6. Were you planning on spending the weekend
us ?
with we ^
we
T
7. to get to the mall, us have to pass the stadium.
Writing: explanation
• Open your book to page 379 and look at the third
paragraph. Listen as I read.
• This paragraph gives a definition of what minerals
are, how they dissolve in water, and why.
• Explanation
• Gives facts and details about a topic
• Explains what or how
• Starts with a topic sentence
• Answers “what?” “how?” and “why?”

similar documents