A few tips! - Broward County Public Schools

Report
The Leadership and Learning Center®
Julie R. Smith, Ph.D.
BASA
Broward Assessment for School
Administrators
Developing a deeper
understanding of
Deliberate
Practice
The Leadership and Learning Center®
Broward County Schools District
Learning Intention/ Success Criteria
•
Briefly review the five elements that make up the
Deliberate Practice process and know how it
connects to your School Improvement Plan
•
Understand what a “Proficiently” created Deliberate
Practice Plan looks like and implement the DP
Development and implementation at a proficient or
higher level
•
Begin the process to develop a “Proficient”
Deliberate Practice Plan
Reflections
With a table partner, briefly
discuss the components of
Deliberate Practice (DP) and
share your learnings from
your 2012-2013 DP plan.
DP Growth Target Template
Viviane Robinson’s Findings
Barometer of Influences on
Achievement
0.30
0.20
0.40
0.50
0.60
0.10
0.70
0
Zone of
desired
effects
0.80
0.90
1.00
Hinge Point=0.40
Elements of Deliberate Practice
• Focus Issue (Why worth pursing?)
• Growth Target (What expect to know/do?)
• Anticipated Gains (What hope to learn?)
• Plan of Action (How accomplish?)
• Progress Points (What to monitor?)
DP Development Rubric
Selecting Growth Targets
Growth
Target
Explanation
Growth
Target #1
An issue that addresses a school improvement need
related to student learning and either selected by the district
or approved by leader’s supervisor. The focus should be on
complex issues that take some time to master such as
providing observation and feedback of high-effect size
instructional practices.
Growth
Target #2
An issue related to a knowledge base or skill set relevant
to instructional leadership (selected by leader).
Growth
Targets #3
and 4
Optional: additional issues as appropriate.
The addition of more targets should involve estimates of the
time needed to accomplish targets 1 and 2. Where targets 1
and 2 are projected for mastery in less than half of a school
year, identify additional target(s).
BASA Self-Assessment
Narrowing the Focus
Self-assessment of all 45 Indicators
Lowest scored indicators
ALL Domains
Lowest scored “weighted”
Indicators Domains 1 & 2
Lowest scored
Indicators
Proficiency
Area 4
1-2 High-leverage Leadership Indicators
Focus Issue
Why is the target worth pursuing?
The leader’s SMART
Goal is drawn directly
from the school’s
School Improvement
Plan…
12
Sample Focus Issue
By June 2014, there will be an
increase to 90% (394), of all 10th
grade students that score a level
4.0 or higher on the Florida
Writes Test.
Cut and Paste SIP Goal
Learning Activity
Considering your School Improvement
Plan and the data you have reviewed
(Targeted area of low student
performance and a related prioritized
area of adult performance), capture a
FOCUS ISSUE (SMART Goal) that is
worthy of devoting your time, leadership
knowledge, skills, and influence.
Growth Target
Describe what you expect to know/do?
The leader’s Growth
Target is a product of
Of your “Narrowing”
process…
1-2 BASA Indicators
briefly described or
leader’s growth target
16
Deliberate Practice Focus
and Growth Target
Formula
School
Improvement
Plan SMART
Goal
Leader's
Growth
Target (2-3
BASA
Indicators)
DP Focus
and
Growth
Target
Sample Growth Target
Indicator 3.6 - Faculty Effectiveness: The leader
monitors the effectiveness of classroom teachers
and uses contemporary research and the district’s
instructional evaluation system criteria and
procedures to improve student achievement and
faculty proficiency on the FEAPs. Indicator 4.2 Feedback Practices: The leader monitors, evaluates
proficiency, and secures and provides timely and
actionable feedback to faculty…
Sample Focus Issue Growth
Target
Your Prioritized BASA
Indicators Should…
• Result in improved teaching and leadership
performance to positively impact student
achievement
• Require the help of a teacher or “coach” or
securing additional professional development
• Be designed to stretch you beyond your
current abilities
• Isolate remarkably specific aspects of your
practice and focus your time and energy on
just those things until they are improved
Learning Activity
Your turn. Identify your 1-2
prioritized “Growth Targets”
from your “narrowing” process.
Write them out on your plan.
Anticipated Gains
Describe what you hope to learn?
Learning barrier
Instructional practice
Leadership practice
22
Sample Anticipated Gains
• Become keenly aware of the barriers to proficient
•
•
student performance to elaborate with both their
expository and persuasive writing
Develop an awareness of the instructional
practices that appear to most help students
overcome those barriers as well as those that
don’t have a positive relationship to
improvements in student writing performance
Determine whether or not the selected leadership
strategy was having the desired impact or not
Anticipated Gains
What You Hope To Learn from Your Efforts
Learning Activity
Your turn. What do you hope to
learn?
Describe your Learning barrier,
Instructional practice, and
Leadership practice
Share your thinking with a Shoulder
Partner.
Plan of Action
How will you accomplish the target?
Observable
Measurable
Formative language
Frequently checked
Application of BASA
26
Cause and Effect Examples
Cause
Effect
A Plan of Action Statement
THEN…
IF…
Plan of Action
If I Increase the percent of faculty
implementing instruction in methods of
elaboration with expository, narrative,
persuasive and text-based writing at
the “Proficient” and higher levels using
a locally developed rubric
Plan of Action
Theory of Action Statement
Sample Descriptions
IF I engage staff in an in-depth study of key non-fiction writing instruction cross
content professional development followed by the proficient implementation of
these non-fiction writing practices in all classes, THEN…
IF I increase the percentage of time spent during faculty meeting discussions
related to targeted student achievement monthly, THEN…
IF I Increase the percentage of faculty who achieve a r=.80 level of agreement
monthly on the collaborative scoring of (insert subject) anonymous student work,
THEN…
IF I increase the percentage of Data Teams (PLCs) whose common formative
assessments are developed at the “proficient” or higher levels monthly, THEN…
Samples of Measurable “IF”
Statements Include…
• IF I increase the number of targeted, sub-group writing assessments scored
by the principal (me) monthly using the school’s collaboratively developed
rubric…THEN…
• IF we increase the number of Data Teams™ (PLCs) the building leader
meets with monthly to review scored samples of “targeted” student work from
key assignments…THEN…
• IF we increase the number of (reading or writing or mathematics) bestpractice strategies modeled during faculty meetings monthly that are
“proficiently” incorporated into classroom instructional practice…THEN…
• IF we increase the number of teachers using high yield instructional
practices at the proficient level as defined by a rubric…THEN…
Sample Plan of Action
Statement
If I Increase the percent of faculty implementing differentiated
writing instruction at the “Proficient” or higher level based
on both direct observation and teacher self-assessment
monthly using a locally developed rubric.
Learning Activity
Your turn. Describe a
measurable Plan of Action “IF”
statement.
Progress Points
Progress points that allow monitoring?
Plan of Action (leader)
Formative Assessment
(student)
34
A Plan of Action Statement
THEN…
IF…
Progress Points
• The percent of staff monthly implementing at
the “Proficient” or higher level instruction in
methods of elaboration with expository,
narrative, persuasive and text-based writing
Percent of students scoring at the
“Proficient” or higher level on expository and
persuasive writing assessment monthly
scored using a locally developed rubric
• The percent of students scoring proficient or
higher on a locally agreed upon writing rubric
Testing the Hypothesis
THEN they would expect
to see similar increases in
the percent of students
scoring at the “Proficient”
or higher levels of a
locally developed writing
assessment using a sitedeveloped rubric.
IF the leader and his/her
teachers demonstrate
monthly increases in
faculty who proficiently (or
higher) implement
differentiated writing
instruction (using a locally
developed rubric),
Cause and Effect Examples
Then
Cause
IF
Effect
Hypothesis Testing
IF…
THEN…
IF I engage staff in an in-depth study
THEN, I expect to see an increase in
of key non-fiction cross content writing
instruction professional development
followed by the proficient
implementation of these non-fiction
writing practices in all classes…
the students’ proficient and higher
cross content writing performance
monthly to a non-fiction writing prompt
IF I conduct 30 classroom
THEN, I expect to see an increase in
observations per week and provide
feedback, which is acted upon by
teachers to improve reading
comprehension instructional
practices…
the percent of proficient and higher
students (reading comprehension)
monthly assessment
Or…
• IF we increase the percentage of faculty members
whose self-reported levels of implementation on
the (insert initiative) rubric is consistent with
observed levels of implementation in the same
area monthly, THEN student reading
comprehension will increase
• IF we increase the number of teachers who
engage in peer observation, reflection, and
application to improve personal practices monthly,
THEN student writing achievement will increase
Samples of Measurable “THEN”
Student Progress Points…
• THEN I expect to see the percent of students scoring “Proficient” or
higher on a monthly writing assessment increase using a locally developed
rubric
• THEN I expect to see an increase in the percent of students scoring at
the “Proficient” or higher level on a monthly reading comprehension
assessment using a school-developed rubric
• THEN I expect to see an increase in the percent of students scoring at
the “Proficient” or higher level on a monthly problem solving assessment
using a locally developed rubric
Sample Progress Point
Statements
Learning Activity
Your turn. Rewrite your “IF” Action
plan statement and describe a
measurable “THEN” student progress
point statement (which you add to the
action plan statement). Share these
two components of your DP with your
table group.
Monitoring and Measuring Your
Deliberate Practice Plan
Collect cause data
Collect effect data
Chart monthly
Share data publicly
Modify as needed
44
Hypothetical Comparison Adult to
Student Achievement
Degree of Implementation vs Impact on Student
Achievement Results
90
Percent Proficient
80
70
60
50
% faculty
implementing
differentiated
writing
instruction at
the proficient
or higher
level
% of students that are
proficient or higher on a
monthly writing assessment
62
65
77
65
60
55
50
50
45
40
30
"IF"
30
"THEN"
20
10
0
September
October
November
January
February
"IF"
30
50
60
55
65
"THEN"
45
62
50
65
77
Monitoring Fequency
Classroom Discussion
0.82
Effect
Size
Ranked 7th overall out of 150
influences on student achievement
46
Questioning
0.48
Effect
Size
Ranked 53rd overall out of 150
influences on student achievement
47
Visible Learning
“…Questioning was
the second most
dominant teaching
method (after teacher
talk)…35-50 percent
of teaching time
posing
questions…60
percent of which are
recall.”
.48 ES
Teachers Talk, Talk, and Talk…
• Classrooms are dominated by
•
•
•
•
•
50
teacher talk
Accounts for 70-80% of class time,
on average
Follows a typical pattern: teacher
initiation, student response, and
teacher evaluation or IRE pattern
IRE pattern fosters lower-order
cognitive learning
Less than 5% of class time devoted
to group discussion
5-10% of teacher talk triggers more
conversation or dialogue engaging
the student
Listen to Students’ Learning
• Listening to students’
dialogue
• Students and teachers
joining together in
addressing questions or
issues of common
concern
• Considering and
evaluating differing ways
of addressing and
learning
• Exchanging and
appreciating each other’s
views
51
Marzano Teacher Evaluation
52
53
Danielson Sample Rubric
The Danielson Group. (n.d.) The Framework for Teaching: Evaluation Instrument. Retrieved May 27, 2013, from
http://www.danielsongroup.org/userfiles/files/downloads/2013EvaluationInstrument.pdf
54
Focused Walkthroughs
Teacher Questions/Discussion Data Gathering
Classrooms Visited
1
2
3
4
5
✓
✓✓
✓✓
✓✓✓
✓✓✓
✓✓✓
✓✓✓
✓✓✓
✓
✓✓✓
✓✓✓
✓✓
✓✓✓
✓✓✓
✓✓✓
✓
✓✓✓
✓
✓✓✓
✓✓✓
✓
✓✓✓
✓✓✓
✓✓✓
✓✓
✓✓✓
✓✓✓
✓
✓✓
Distinguished Level 4: Students initiate higher-order questions The teacher builds
on and uses student responses to questions in order to deepen student understanding Students
extend the discussion, enriching it Students invite comments from their classmates during a
discussion and challenge one another’s thinking Virtually all students are engaged in the discussion
Proficient Level 3: The teacher uses open-ended questions, inviting students to think
and/or offer multiple possible answers The teacher makes effective use of wait time Discussions
enable students to talk to one another without ongoing mediation by the teacher The teacher calls on
most students, even those who don’t initially volunteer Many students actively engage in the
discussion The teacher asks students to justify their reasoning, and most attempt to do so
Basic Level 2: The teacher frames some questions designed to promote student thinking,
but many have a single correct answer, and the teacher calls on students quickly The teacher invites
students to respond directly to one another’s ideas, but few students respond The teacher calls on
many students, but only a small number actually participate in the discussion The teacher asks
students to explain their reasoning, but only some students attempt to do so
Unsatisfactory Level 1: Questions are rapid-fire and convergent, with a single
correct answer Questions do not invite student thinking All discussion is between the teacher and
students; students are not invited to speak directly to one another The teacher does not ask students
to explain their thinking Only a few students dominate the discussion
55
Focused Walkthrough Data
Percent of Classrooms
Teacher Questions/Discussion
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
10
20
20
13
65
67
20
15
75
September
October
November
Frequency of Data Collection
Level 1-2
56
15
Level 3
Level 4
22
58
December
Feeser Elementary School SelfAssessment, ObservationalAssessment vs Student Achievement
Percent Proficient
120
100
80
60
84
74
81
68
90
8077
96
71
57
54
53 54
36
40
27
20
94
87
41
43
33
9
0
Sept
Oct
Self-Assessment
Nov
Dec
Observed-Assessment
Jan
Feb
Mar
Writing Achievement
DP Development Rubric
Check the DP Components
Focus Issue
A SMART Goal from the school’s SIP
Growth
Target
1-2 Prioritized BASA Indicators
Anticipated
Gain(s)
Describes what the leader hopes to learn about–
• The obstacles to proficient student performance
within the content area in the Focus Issue
• Which instructional practices are related
• Whether the leadership strategy is having an
impact
Plan of
Action
A single strategy that is measurable, observable and
time bound, which requires the leader to apply the
prioritized FSLA Indicators in the Growth Target
Progress
Points
Only two progress points are identified—
• The Plan of Action statement (the adult measure)
• A formative student achievement measure related
to the content identified within the Focus Issue
59
A Completed DP Template
Compare Deliberate Practice
Development Rubric and School
Leader Plan
Focus Issue
Growth Target
Anticipated Gains
Plan of Action
Progress Points
61
DP Implementation Rubric
The Leadership and Learning Center®
Broward County Public Schools
Questions and Next Steps
Julie R. Smith, Ph.D.
[email protected]
720-470-1146 (cell phone)

similar documents