Guide to assessment of users

Report
AGES: Activating and guiding the
engagement of seniors
Assessment Training
Project Background
 The number and quality of social relationships has important
consequences for individual health and well-being.
 People with broader social networks, and who are active
across multiple social groups:
 adjust to change better (Iyer et al., 2009)
 are more resilient (Jones & Jetten, 2011; Cohen et al. 1997)
al., 1997
 live longer (Holt-Lunstad, et al., 2010)
 Supporting individuals to create and maintain social connections is
an important focus for public health (Cacioppo & Hawkley, 2003)
Project Background

Aging can coincide with:

Reduced physical mobility

Difficulties of communication

Increased social isolation

Both actual social isolation and felt social isolation (i.e., loneliness) have
been linked to reduced physical, cognitive and mental health.

Social media has the potential to overcome physical constraints,
improve communication and social connections and through this
support health and well-being in older age.
Project Background
 Early studies (McConatha et al., 1994, 1995) show positive effects of
training older adults in care to use online computing facilities:
 Improved daily living skills
 Improved cognitive function
 Reduced depression
 More recent work (Slegers et al, 2008; White et al., 2002) suggests
few psychosocial benefits of computer and internet training for older
adults in the community.
Project Aims
 To investigate further the effects of social media training on older
adults:
 Feelings of social inclusion
 Cognitive function
 Mental health and well-being
 To compare the effects of social media training across older adults
in care and those residing in the community.
User Pathway
Use
Social Media
Training
Cognitive
Health
Social
Inclusion
Mental
Health
Experimental Design
60D
120
30E
30E
30E
30C
60R
30E
30C
1.
2.
3.
4.
30E
Recruitment
Baseline assessment
Training
Follow-up assessment
30E
30C
30E
30E
30E
30E
30C
Assessment Process

Two interviews: Before the intervention and 3 months later, each between 1-2 hours.

Measures:

Demographic Questionnaire (e.g., date of birth, gender)

Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination Revised (ACE-R, Misoshi et al., 2006)

General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12; Hankins, 2008)

Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, Rankin, 1977; short version)

Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI-short form; Byrne & Pachana, 2011)

UCLA Loneliness Scale (short form based on Hays & DiMatteo, 1987)

Basic Needs Satisfaction Scale (autonomy and competence dimensions; Gagne, 2003)

Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985)

Social network diversity index (Cohen et al., 1997) and satisfaction with these connections
(adapted for the present study)

Social group membership listing (Haslam et al., 2008)

Personal identity strength (Haslam et al., 2008)

Computer comfort and use scale (adapted from Jay & Willis, 1992; with additional items
developed for this study)
Assessment Context
 Promoting an ideal assessment:
 Client-Examiner relationship:
 Focus on developing rapport and co-operation. Good humour
that is well placed will help to cement these.
 Be prepared and know what the assessment involves
 Be sensitive to user’s needs (for breaks, drinks, concerns about
performance, etc).
 The aim is to obtain the best possible performance from people
which can only be gained through a good working relationship.
 To keep anxiety at a minimum it is best to avoid reference to
assessment. Simply refer to an interview.
Assessment Context
 Promoting an ideal assessment:
 Assessment Environment:
 You need a quiet, comfortable space free from distraction.
 Use a table and comfortable chairs — avoid lounge.
 Ensure the room is well lit and aired for comfort.
 Make sure you have water available to drink as you both need.
Assessment Context
 Promoting an ideal assessment:
 Client Readiness (or fitness to be assessed):
 Arrange assessments in advance; avoid early morning and late
afternoon.
 Contact person the day before to remind them of your meeting.
 Ensure the person is well enough to take part in your interview.
 Provide breaks as needed, and do so at the end of a task or
questionnaire.
Interview Protocol: Stages
 Consent and background information
 ACE-R
 Mood, anxiety and life quality
 Social relationships
 Computer confidence and use
Let’s practice!

similar documents