SLO Day 1 Tammy Jo Schlechter

Report
INTERNET CONNECTION
Welcome!
• Check ‘net connection for
http://bit.ly/SDDay1SLO Do you
have access to the handouts?
• Feel free to adjust tables to see
visual aids!
• SIT AT TABLES ACCORDING TO THE
puzzle piece you drew. (For now… we may
regroup later.)
Tammy Jo Schlechter 
WELCOME
• My colleagues are gathered here
from across the state!
• Before we begin… do we have an
“aisle” the length of the room-?
• Peanut allergies? I brought snacks!

WHAT TEACHERS DO DURING THE SUMMER
Before we get to
our:
Orientation to
Student Learning
Objectives
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X551qBVl
Nds
Parking Lot Activity
• Throughout the
day, post
questions at your
parking lot.
• Periodically,
remind Tammy Jo
to check “parking
lots.”
• Everyone is
encouraged to
respond to
questions.
TAKE AWAY WINDOW
1) FOLD A PIECE OF PAPER
HAMBURGER STYLE
2) Write “TAKE AWAY WINDOW” on
the front flap. Look for
moments.
3) Write “ACTION STEPS” on the back
flap.
WHAT DO WE KNOW??
• On a sticky note or a sheet of
paper… Number the paper 1-7.
1.
2.
3.
…
Rating your knowledge
FIRST STATEMENT: I know the definition of an S.L.O.
1. I don’t know anything about the definition of an SLO.
2. I know a little bit about the definition of an S.L.O.
3. I am comfortable with the definition of an S.L.O.
4. I could teach someone about the definition of an
S.L.O.
Rate Yourself…
1. I know the definition of an SLO.
2. I understand the four steps of the SLO
process.
3. I know how to establish baseline data and
determine growth.
4. I know the components of a SMART goal.
5. I know how growth ratings are calculated.
6. I can determine the quality of an SLO using
the SLO Quality Checklist.
7. I know how an SLO connects to teacher
evaluation.
BUILDING THE VISUAL
• Use the PINK small sticky notes on
your table.
• POSTERS ON THE WALL --Put a pink
note under the number rating you
gave yourself for each statement.
S.M.A.R.T. Growth Goal
A.K.A. OUR “S.L.0.”
By the end of the day, all of the participants in
the training will rate themselves as a 3 or 4 for
each of the seven statements given.
Seven 1-minute
Conversations
1. For each statement, Find another person that gave
themselves a different rating than you.
2. 1 minute conversation – Share what you already
know or do not know about the given statement.
Let the higher ranking go first. If you ranked
yourself a 1, ask a follow up question for better
clarification.
3. Don’t forget to quickly introduce yourself! Mingle
with teachers from different schools and get to
know each other.
Agenda
Morning:
What is an S.L.O?
How does it connect to the Charlotte Danielson Framework?
How does it connect to Teacher Evaluations?
What are the 4 steps in the S.L.O. Process?
Afternoon:
How do I Write an S.L.O. using the Process Guide?
How will my Growth Rating be calculated?
Discussing and Understanding all the options!!
TABLE INTRO’S
• What’s your name?
• Where are you from?
• What do you teach and for how
long?
• What has your school done to
prepare for S.L.O.’s and the new
teacher evaluation model so far?
If it doesn’t
Challenge
It doesn’t
Y O U
Change
Y O U
SLO does not need to add to your
plate.
As I worked
with the SLO
process, I
found it
validated the
best practices I
have found on
my own! 
Norms for the Day
Listen with Engagement
Honor Each Other’s Thinking
Honor Private Think Time
Everyone has a Voice
Be Respectful of all Comments
Limit Side Conversation
Take Care of Your Needs
Cell Phones Off/Vibrate
• Lids down. Save devices for WORK TIME.

Parking Lot
Sharing question: the “protocol” for today
• Write questions on sticky notes.
• Place on parking lots at table.
• Claim question at your table that you can
answer.
• If we cannot answer questions, they end up
in the SD DOE Parking Lot on the wall.
Outcomes Today
1. I know the definition of an SLO.
2. I understand the four steps of the SLO process.
3. I know how to establish baseline data and
determine growth.
4. I know the components of a SMART goal.
5. I know how growth ratings are calculated.
6. I can determine the quality of an SLO using the
SLO Quality Checklist.
7. I know how an SLO connects to teacher
evaluation.
A Little Bit of History
• South Dakota’s work to develop meaningful educator
effectiveness systems is united by a common
aspiration: To improve instruction and student
learning.
– The 2010 Teacher Standards Workgroup
– Adopted Charlotte Danielson Framework for Teaching now
known as The SD Framework for Teaching
– The 2011-2012 Teacher Standards Pilot Districts
– The 2012 Teacher Evaluation Workgroup
– The SD Commission of Teaching and Learning
– The 2013-2014 Teacher Effectiveness Pilot participants
– The 2013-2014 Principal Effectiveness Pilot participants
– The University of South Dakota
More History…
• Evaluations in the past in SD
• Teacher evaluation and NCLB waiver
• SD Teacher Effectiveness Model: 2 parts
– Professional practice (SD Framework for
Teaching)
– Student Growth
• How does it all fit together?
The Aspiration: Improve Instruction
and Student Learning
1. Encourage meaningful, in-depth dialogue focused on
improving instruction
2. Provide regular, timely, useful feedback that guides
professional growth
3. Support a culture in which data drives instructional decisions
4. Establish clear expectations for teacher performance
5. Use multiple measures to meaningfully determine and
differentiate teacher performance
6. Provide a fair, flexible, research-based model that informs
personnel decisions.
Determining Teacher Effectiveness
Using multiple measures of professional practice and student learning
South Dakota Framework for Teaching
Student Growth
The
Recommended
Model!
Domain 1
Domain 2
Domain 3
Domain 4
SLOs
Planning and
Preparation
Classroom
Environment
Instruction
Professional
Responsibilities
State Assessments
• Classroom Observations and Evidence of Effective Practice
• Components from Each of the 4 Domains
(as one measure if available)
District Assessments
Evaluator-Approved
Assessments
• At Least 8 Components Chosen Based on District or School Priorities
Professional Practice Rating
Growth Rating
Summative Rating Matrix
Professional Oversight: Is the rating fair and accurate based on the evidence
and data shared by the teacher
Differentiated Performance Categories
Below Expectations
Meets Expectations
Exceeds Expectations
Determining Teacher Effectiveness
Using multiple measures of professional practice and student learning
South Dakota Framework for Teaching
Student Growth
Domain 1
Domain 2
Domain 3
Domain 4
SLOs
Planning and
Preparation
Classroom
Environment
Instruction
Professional
Responsibilities
State Assessments
• Classroom Observations and Evidence of Effective Practice
• Components from Each of the 4 Domains
(as one measure if available)
District Assessments
Evaluator-Approved
Assessments
• At Least 8 Components Chosen Based on District or School Priorities
Professional Practice Rating
Growth Rating
Summative Rating Matrix
Professional Oversight: Is the rating fair and accurate based on the evidence
and data shared by the teacher
Differentiated Performance Categories
Below Expectations
Meets Expectations
Exceeds Expectations
Summative Scoring Matrix
Summative Teacher Effectiveness Rating Categories
Below
Expectations
Meets
Expectations
Exceeds
Expectations
Judgment
Rating Subject
✪ to Review
Teacher A
Summative Teacher Effectiveness Rating Categories
Below
Expectations
Meets
Expectations
Exceeds
Expectations
Judgment
Rating Subject
✪ to Review
Teacher B
Judgment
Rating Subject
to Review
Summative Teacher Effectiveness Rating Categories
Below
Expectations
Meets
Expectations
Exceeds
Expectations
Judgment
Rating Subject
✪ to Review
Teacher C
Judgment
Rating Subject
to Review
Summative Teacher Effectiveness Rating Categories
Below
Expectations
Meets
Expectations
Exceeds
Expectations
Judgment
Rating Subject
✪ to Review
Cannot forget…
• Have you signed the sign in sheet?
• …picked up graduate credit or CEU
paper work?
• Stipend forms will come at the end
of the day.
Outcomes Today
1. I know the definition of an SLO.
2. I understand the four steps of the SLO process.
3. I know how to establish baseline data and
determine growth.
4. I know the components of a SMART goal.
5. I know how growth ratings are calculated.
6. I can determine the quality of an SLO using the
SLO Quality Checklist.
7. I know how an SLO connects to teacher
evaluation.
Chunking today
– I know the definition of an SLO.
– I understand the four steps of the SLO process.
– I know the components of a SMART goal.
– I know how to establish baseline data, determine
growth and calculate growth ratings.
– I can determine the quality of an SLO based on the
SLO Quality Checklist.
– I know how SLOs connect to teacher evaluation.
SLO PROCESS
CHUNK 1
Let’s Define It!
Student Growth
Student Learning Objective
Student growth is defined as a
positive change in student
achievement between two or
more points in time. Using a
measure of student growth – as
opposed to using student
achievement results from a
single test delivered at a single
point in time – is more
reflective of the impact an
individual teacher has on
student learning.
A Student Learning Objective is a
teacher-‐driven goal or set of goals
that establish expectations for
student academic growth over a
period of time. The specific, rigorous,
realistic and measurable goal(s) must
be based on baseline data and
represent the most important
learning that needs to occur during
the instructional period. SLOs are
aligned to applicable Common Core,
state or national standards.
Definition of a Teacher
•
•
•
•
•
(a) Provides instruction to any grade, kindergarten through
grade twelve, or ungraded class or who teaches in an
environment other than a classroom setting;
(b) Maintains daily student records;
(c) Has completed an approved teacher education program
at an accredited institution or completed an alternative
certification program;
(d) Has been issued a South Dakota certificate; and
(e) Is not serving as a principal, assistant principal,
superintendent, or assistant superintendent.
How many SLOs?
A minimum of 1 SLO per
teacher is required.
• Teachers can write more, but only one
is required by the state and used for
evaluation purposes.
• Districts may require more than one
SLO.
SLO’s: Like Walking Up A Staircase…
SLO COMPLETE
Progress Update
Daily Learning Outcomes/targets
Vocab. Checkpoint
• Quick choose a partner! 
• Decide who is “peanut butter” and
decide who is “jelly”
• Line up as partners with peanut
butter all one side and jelly on t’
other… “peanut butter” side
towards Tammy Jo
Student Learning Objective
Student Learning Target/Outcome
Baseline Assessment
• Switch directions and “jelly” face
me now!
Progress Update
Summative Assessment
Vocabulary Check- Cole’s
short and sweet version
• Student Learning Objective(LONG TERM)
• Student Learning Target/Outcome
(SHORT TERM)
• Baseline Assessment (PRE-TEST)
• Progress Update (How are they doing at half way point?)
• Summative Assessment (POST TEST)
Vocabulary Check- TJ’s
version
Student Learning Objective: shares a teacher-‐driven goal or set of goals that
establish expectations for student academic growth over a period of time (the SLO is
more global like at least a semester or year long time-frame… when comparing to a
SLT)
Student Learning Target/Outcome: Describes daily expectations regarding student
learning…often what teachers post in the classroom
Baseline Assessment: Defines the students current level of understanding, skill,
knowledge, performance, This is the starting point for growth goal.
Summative Assessment: Defines the students final level of understanding, skill,
knowledge, performance. This is the end point for growth goal.
Progress Update: Defines the students progress toward, and checks for progress
toward growth goal.
• Coming next! Example of the heart
of the Student Learning Objective…
Sample Growth Goal
For the 2013-14 school year, 90% of
my students will make the end of the
year benchmark as measured by the
DIBELS Next and DAZE assessments.
This example is the end
result of working through
the SLO development.
SLO Process Guide
• Reflect Best Practice
• Flexible
• Timeline, amount of growth, type,
assessment
• Between Teacher and Evaluator
• Collaborative
• Focused
The SLO Process
SLO
Development
SLO Approval
Prioritize Learning Content
What do I want my students to be able to
know and do?
Analyze data and develop baselines
Where are my students starting?
Ongoing
Communication
Select or develop an assessment
Prepare for
Summative
Write growth goal
What assessments are available?
What can I expect my students to achieve?
Process Timeline
SLO
SLO Approval
Development
Fall
Aug.-Oct
Progress
Update
End of SLO
year/semest
er mtg with
evaluator
Break moment here?
Step 1
SLO
Development
SLO Approval
Prioritize Learning Content
What do I want my students to be able to
know and do?
Analyze data and develop baselines
Where are my students starting?
Ongoing
Communication
Select or develop an assessment
Prepare for
Summative
Write growth goal
What assessments are available?
What can I expect my students to achieve?
STEP 1 EXAMPLE
PRIORITIZE LEARNING CONTENT: What do I want my students to be able to
know and do?
- I want them to be proficient in simplifying algebraic
expressions and solving algebraic equations by the end of the first
semester. (linear, quadratic, radical, rational)
ANALYZE DATA AND DEVELOP BASELINE: Where are my students starting?
- What did they cover last year? S.B.A. results?
SELECT or DEVELOP an ASSESSMENT: What assessments
are available?
- Semester Tests, End of Year Exams, M.A.P.S. , …
WRITE GROWTH GOAL: What can I expect my students to achieve?
- By the end of the first semester, All of my Algebra 1 students will
reach 85% proficiency in simplying expressions and solving equations that
are linear, quadratic, radical, and rational.
Step 2
SLO
Development
SLO Approval
Prioritize Learning Content
What do I want my students to be able to
know and do?
Analyze data and develop baselines
Where are my students starting?
Ongoing
Communication
Select or develop an assessment
Prepare for
Summative
Write growth goal
What assessments are available?
What can I expect my students to achieve?
2. SLO Approval
• Teacher submits a completed SLO process guide to
Evaluator
• Evaluator schedules meeting with teacher
– Can be supported by a face to face meeting
– May take place during other evaluation/related meeting
• Clearly identify information needed to determine
SLO quality (SLO Checklist) including amount and
type of data
– Identify revision window if needed
• Teacher and Evaluator mutually agree on SLO and
approve
Step 3
SLO
Development
SLO Approval
Prioritize Learning Content
What do I want my students to be able to
know and do?
Analyze data and develop baselines
Where are my students starting?
Ongoing
Communication
Select or develop an assessment
Prepare for
Summative
Write growth goal
What assessments are available?
What can I expect my students to achieve?
3. Ongoing Communication
• Describe student progress toward
the growth goal.
• If necessary, document changes in
strategy.
• If justified*, describe changes to the
SLO
Justified Examples*
• A teacher’s roster changes drastically due
to high student mobility rates.
• A teacher’s assignment changes
significantly over the course of the year.
• A teacher serves as a pull-in/push-out
teacher or co-teaches.
• Long-term leave
Step 4
SLO
Development
SLO Approval
Prioritize Learning Content
What do I want my students to be able to
know and do?
Analyze data and develop baselines
Where are my students starting?
Ongoing
Communication
Select or develop an assessment
Prepare for
Summative
Write growth goal
What assessments are available?
What can I expect my students to achieve?
4. Prepare for Summative
• Make sure your principal has adequate
time to determine rating prior to your
summative meeting.
• Teachers: consider self scoring and
reflect to guide conversation during
summative meeting
• SLO Process Guide may be used as
evidence/artifacts for SD Framework.
REVIEW
• What is an S.L.O.?
- A teacher-‐driven goal or set of goals that establish expectations for
student academic growth over a period of time. The specific, rigorous,
realistic and measurable goal(s) must be based on baseline data and
represent the most important learning that needs to occur during the
instructional period. SLOs are aligned to applicable Common Core, state
or national standards.
• What are the 4 steps
–
–
–
–
1. S.L.O. Development
2. S.L.O. Approval
3. Ongoing Communication
4. Preparing for Summative
BEFORE THE BREAK
• HIGHLIGHT, INSIGHT, UPTIGHT
On a sticky note or sheet of paper…
1) What is one highlight from the morning so
far?
2) What is one insight (AHA! Moment)?
3) What is one thing you are “uptight” or
confused about still?
BREAK TIME
• 10 MINUTES --- PLEASE BE SEATED
AND READY TO ROLL!!!
• RESPECT THE AGENDA!!
Chunking today
– I know the definition of an SLO.
– I understand the four steps of the SLO process.
– I know the components of a SMART goal.
– I know how to establish baseline data, determine
growth and calculate growth ratings.
– I can determine the quality of an SLO based on
the SLO Quality Checklist.
– I know how SLOs connect to teacher evaluation.
HIGHLIGHT, INSIGHT,
UPTIGHT
• Discuss with your Elbow partner.
• Discuss with your table.
• Discuss with the whole group.
1) Find someone from a different table that is from a different school…
2) You have 1 minute in the elevator with your prinicipal, and she/he asks
what you learned about an S.L.O. Process? What are you going to say?
Chunk # 2
HOW DO I
WRITE AN
SLO?
The SLO Process
SLO
Development
SLO Approval
Prioritize Learning Content
What do I want my students to be able to
know and do?
Analyze data and develop baselines
Where are my students starting?
Ongoing
Communication
Select or develop an assessment
Prepare for
Summative
Write growth goal
What assessments are available?
What can I expect my students to achieve?
3 BIG DECISIONS TO GET
STARTED
1.What content will be the priority of my
S.L.O.??? (What do I want my students to know and be able to do?)
2.What is the student population for my
S.L.O.??? (Where are they starting? How many of them are there?)
3.What assessment will I use to measure
student learning and growth???
(What is available? What is appropriate? What level is it assessing?)
What do I want my students to
know and be able to do?
– Identify the core concepts and standards.
• What resources might you use to determine
big/essential ideas?
– i.e. blueprints, disaggregated standards,
curriculum maps, power standards, national
standards, content standards and common core
standards
– Know your timeline
for instruction
Open Blank Process Guide
Keep it
open and
ready.
Later
today,
you will
share
your
sample of
work…
UNDERSTANDING THE
SLO PROCESS GUIDE:
LET’S DIG IN!
Prioritizing Learning
Content: Math Teacher’s Example
Prioritize
Learning
Content:
Identify
standards and
content.
What is the most important learning that needs to occur during the
instructional period? Specify which standard(s) the SLO addresses and
Identify the specific data source or trend data used. (1a)
Students can write, apply, and use expressions, equations, and
inequalities (7th and 8th). (EE)
Students can apply previous understanding about arithmetic to algebraic expressions; reason about and solve one-variable
equations and inequalities; and represent and analyze quantative relationships between dependent and independent variables
(6.EE).
Students can use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions and solve real-life and mathematical problems
using numerical and algebraic expressions and equations (7.EE).
Students can work with radicals and integer exponents; understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines,
and linear equations; and analyze and solve linear equations and simultaneous linear equations (8.EE).
Pre-test
Last years end of
year data
Statewide summative
data
Other…
Trend data
District
assessment
data
Prioritizing Learning Content
Students can write, apply, and use expressions, equations, and inequalities
(7th and 8th). (EE)
Students can apply previous understanding about arithmetic to algebraic
expressions; reason about and solve one-variable equations and inequalities;
and represent and analyze quantative relationships between dependent and
independent variables (6.EE).
Students can use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions
and solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic
expressions and equations (7.EE).
Students can work with radicals and integer exponents; understand the
connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations;
and analyze and solve linear equations and simultaneous linear equations
(8.EE).
What Will Be the
Scope of SLOs? We have three choices! 
Comprehensive Scope
Essential Skills and Content
Focused Scope
(e.g., all Grade 8
Common Core State
Standards for English
language arts [ELA])
(e.g., all Grade 8 Common
Core State Standards for
informational text in ELA)
(e.g., Grade 8 Common
Core State Standards for
evaluating arguments and
claims in text)
Strengths Drawbacks
Strengths
Strengths Drawbacks
• Covers all • Can be
• Focuses on
learning
difficult or
most
• May work cumbersome
important
well for
to assess well
learning
courses
that
already
have
finals or
cert.
exams
Drawbacks
• Can still be • Can
difficult to
focus on
assess well
area of
• Involves
need
judgment to • Easiest
determine
of the
what is
three to
most
assess
important
• Not
representative
of the learning
that occurred
during the
course
Prioritizing Learning Content
Prioritize
Learning
Content:
Identify
standards and
content.
What is the most important learning that needs to occur during the
instructional period? Specify which standard(s) the SLO addresses and
Identify the specific data source or trend data used. (1a)
Think back to last year, what
would you have chosen to work
on with students? Think of a
possible high need area.
Think-Pair-Share in 5!
Where are my students
starting?
1. Gather and analyze data to determine how
well prepared students are to learn core
concepts.
– Know your students
– Consider which students will be addressed by
this SLO
– Consider special needs
and behaviors
Choosing a Student
Population
What if…?
1. S.L.O. is written for all of the Algebra I
students. (ex. Periods 1, 4, 6, and 7)
2. S.L.O. is written for one specific Algebra I
class. (Ex. Just Period 1 Algebra Class)
What are the strengths and weaknesses of each
scenario?
Elbow Discussion, Table Discussion, Group Discussion
Course-Level SLO
Examples:
• The S.L.O. for Algebra I
we just discussed
• A social studies
teacher writes an SLO
that includes the
students from his U.S.
history classes (class
periods 1, 3, 5, and 6) .
Strengths
Drawbacks
• Accounts more • Can be difficult
accurately for
for educators
the students
without a
taught by the
course (e.g.,
teacher
special
• Reduces
educators,
measurement
specialists)
error because • May increase
numbers of
the amount of
students
data analysis
included in the
teachers need
SLO is high
to conduct
88
Class-Level SLO
Examples:
• The S.L.O. for one class of
Algebra I we just discussed
• A social studies teacher
writes an SLO that includes
the students from his
period 3 U.S. history class.
• A Grade 3 teacher includes
all 24 of her students in a
reading SLO.
Strengths
• May
reduce the
amount of
data
collection
and
analysis
teachers
need to
conduct
Drawbacks
• Can be difficult for
teachers without a
formal course (e.g.,
special educators,
specialists)
• Can place emphasis
on one class over
another
• May not as
accurately account
for a teacher’s
students
Teach two subjects?
• NOTE: If you
teach two (or
more) subjects
go with the
tested subject!
Identify Student Population:
Math Teacher’s Example
Identify the
Student
Population:
Describe the
context of the
class.
How many students are addressed by the SLO? Detail any
characteristics or special learning circumstances of the class(es). (1b,
1c)
All students enrolled in middle school math will be addressed through
the SLO (35 regular education students, 5 SPED students)
What will effect the
most students?
Know your kids!
Learning
disabilities
Behavior
Issues?
ELL?
Identify Student Population
Identify the
Student
Population:
Describe the
context of the
class.
How many students are addressed by the SLO? Detail any
characteristics or special learning circumstances of the class(es). (1b,
1c)
Think back to last year,
what was your classroom
make-up for students?
Think-Pair-Share
in 5!
Interval of Instruction:
Math
Teacher’s Example
Interval of
Instruction:
Specify the time
frame in which
growth will
What is the time period in which student growth is expected to occur?
Identify the length of the course or provide rationale for a time period
that is less than the full length of the course.
The 2014-2015 school year.
The School
Year?
How long will you
measure the growth?
Other?
A Semester
Class?
9 weeks?
Interval of Instruction
Interval of
What is the time period in which student growth is expected to occur?
Instruction:
Identify the length of the course or provide rationale for a time period
Specify the time that is less than the full length of the course.
frame in which
growth will
Think back to last year,
would you use the whole
year? A semester? A three
month period?
Share out as a
table in 5!
What Assessments
are Available?
• Select or develop an appropriate assessment
to measure student learning and growth.
• Content assessed at baseline is comparable
to content assessed at the end of instruction
• Describe how the goal attainment
will be measured.
Is Assessment Appropriate?
• Aligned to priority content & standards
• Measures what it was designed to measure
• Produces accurate and consistent picture of
what student know & do
• Gives sufficient time to administer and
generates data in a timely fashion
Less Common
More Common
“More Common” = More Widely Used
STATE MANDATED ASSESSMENTS
This category includes assessments mandated for use statewide and includes assessments
required by state and federal law.
Examples: Smarter Balanced Assessment, Dakota Step Science Assessment (or the staterequired science assessment)
COMMON STATE AND DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS
This category includes assessments not mandated for state use but are widely used by
several districts and schools. Assessments in this category include commercially available
assessments, district-developed pre- and post-tests or course-level assessments.
Assessments could also take the form of established rubric-scored performance-based
assessments.
Examples: Assessments available through the South Dakota Assessment Portal, End-ofCourse Exams, Write-to-Learn, WIDA-Access Placement Test (English-Language learners),
National Career Readiness Certificate, DIBELS, AP Exams, STARS reading/math, MAPS, AIMS
Web, CTE Performance Contests/Judging.
TEACHER-DEVELOPED ASSESSMENTS
This category of assessments includes classroom assessments used by a single course for a
particular teacher.
Analyze Data &
Develop Baseline: Math Teacher’s Example
Analyze Data and
Develop
Baseline:
Detail student
understanding of
the content at
the beginning of
the instructional
period.
Where are my students starting? Summarize student baseline
performance and attach additional data if necessary. (1b, 1f, 3d)
The students and I noticed that our weakest area as a team is in
algebraic reasoning. I need to be more specific, so please see
attached data that shows our specific scores of students on their fall
NWEA MAP math test.
State the
scores.
These scores are
expected to be low!
Bring in multiple
measures if possible.
Where are
my
students
starting?
Name the
assessments
used.
Analyze Data &
Develop Baseline
Analyze Data and Where are my students starting? Summarize student baseline
Develop
performance and attach additional data if necessary. (1b, 1f, 3d)
Baseline:
Detail student
understanding of
the content at
the beginning of
the instructional
period.
Think back to last year (and thinking
ahead to this coming year), what could
you use to pre-assess and post-assess
your students?
Discuss in 5!
Select or Develop an
Assessment: Math Teacher Example
Select or
Develop an
Assessment:
Describe how the
goal attainment
will be measured.
After looking
at all data –
choose one
assessment
for your SLO.
What specific assessment or instrument will be used to measure
goal attainment? Describe the source of the assessment and the
connection to identified content and standards. (1c, 1d, 1f, and 3d)
I will use NWEA Map math benchmark assessments. This assessment
aligns with CCSS. This tool is used district-wide and I have data
collected from last year for comparison.
Where did you get the
assessment?
How does this assessment
connect to the content?
Select or Develop an
Assessment
Select or
What specific assessment or instrument will be used to measure
Develop an
goal attainment? Describe the source of the assessment and the
Assessment:
connection to identified content and standards. (1c, 1d, 1f, and 3d)
Describe how the
goal attainment
will be measured.
Continue your discussion of
what your assessment
portion of the SLO process
would look like?
Discuss in 5!
What can I expect my
students to achieve?
• Leads to the development of student growth
objectives with a strong rationale supporting
why the objectives are appropriate.
•How will I help my students
obtain the goal?
The SMART Process
A Format for Developing SLOs
S
M
A
R
T
Specific
Measurable
Appropriate
Realistic &
Rigorous
Time-bound
The goal
addresses
student
needs within
the content.
An
appropriate
instrument or
measure is
selected to
assess the
goal.
The goal is
standardsbased,
needsfocused (and
directly
addresses all
students)
The goal is
attainable
and stretches
student
learning.
The goal is
contained to
a single
school
year/course.
WRITING THE GROWTH
GOAL
•GROWTH GOALS ARE
THE HEART OF THE
S.L.O.
–They Should be
S.M.A.R.T. !!!!
(Smart) Specific
• Does the SLO state exactly what
learning content needs to be addressed
and the specific standards to which the
learning content relates?
• Is the learning content aligned to
Common Core State Standards, state
content standards or credible national
standards?
(sMart) Measurable
• Standards-based assessment?
• Comparable across classrooms?
• Measures are stated by increases in:
– Rate,
– Percentage,
– Number,
– Level of performance,
– Rubric standards,
– Gain Score or
– Other ways…
(smArt) Appropriate
• Was the SLO developed using baseline data
that is comparable between the beginning and
end of the instructional period?
• Is the SLO directly related to a teacher’s
subject, grade-level and students?
• For a Class Mastery Goal, does the goal include
all students in the class or course?
• For a Differentiated Growth Goal, does the
goal include a growth goal for all groups of
students?
(smaRt) Realistic &
Rigorous
• Does the SLO contain a growth goal
that identifies expected student
growth that stretches the outer
boundary of what is attainable?
• Is the SLO rigorous when compared
to SLOs established by teachers in
similar grades/subjects?
(smarT) Time-bound
• Does the SLO have a time frame for
accomplishing the measurable
objective?
• Is there ongoing progress monitoring
data for adjusting the learning
experience toward the goal?
• Is the data collected between 2 points
in time, as close to beginning and
ending of course as possible?
BREAK TIME 
• TIME FOR A BREAK! 10 MINUTES
Thinking about: “In the SLO process,
teachers write student growth goals
using the SMART format.”
• As the following music ends, it is the
signal to begin again 
www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtoHuckFAVE
REMEMBER:
The
Growth Goal
isREMEMBER…
component
of the
entire SLO.
one
Growth Goals
Based on quality baseline data and educatordetermined definition of mastery. Goal is structured
based on percent of students attaining mastery.
Class
Mastery
Establishes tiered expectations for student growth for
groups of students. The educators define what growth
looks like for each group of students.
Differentiate
d Growth
Teams of teachers agree to work collaboratively and
share responsibility/accountability for student learning
for a content area, grade level or school.
Shared
Performanc
e
Growth Goal Example
Statements
By the end of the first semester, All students will reach
90% proficiency in simplifying algebraic expressions
and solving algebraic equations that are linear,
quadratic, rational, and radical.
By the end of the first semester, all students that
obtained a score in the D or F range will improve by at
least two letter grades and all students that obtained
a score in the C or B range will improve by one letter
grade. A score in the A range should improve their
percentage.
By the end of the school year, all students in the
middle school will show at least a 15% improvement in
their score on the assessment dealing with the
probability and statistics standards for their grade
level.
Class
Mastery
Differentiate
d Growth
Shared
Performanc
e
Growth Goal
Growth Goal:
Establish
expectations for
student growth.
What can I expect my students to achieve? Establish rigorous
expectations for student performance. (1b 1c)
90% of Spanish I students will pass the Spanish Language Reading,
Writing, Listening and Speaking EOC assessments.
Mastery
How far can you take
students from where
they start?
Rubric standard, gain
scores, or other….
Use the
SMART
goal
format.
Can be measured
using rate,
percentage,
number,
Level of
performance,
Growth Goal
Growth Goal:
Establish
expectations for
student growth.
Differentiated
What can I expect my students to achieve? Establish rigorous
expectations for student performance. (1b 1c)
Differentiated Growth: Middle school Spanish Exploratory
students=95% of students will pass Spanish Language Reading,
Writing, Listening and Speaking assessment.
Non-Middle School Spanish students = 90% of students will pass
Spanish Language Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking
assessment.
Growth Goal
Growth Goal:
Establish
expectations for
student growth.
Shared
Performance
What can I expect my students to achieve? Establish rigorous
expectations for student performance. (1b 1c)
Anderson Spanish I; Jones Spanish I; Smith Spanish I = 85% or above
on the final assessment.
RATE YOURSELF:
use yellow sticky note
1. I know the definition of an SLO.
2. I understand the four steps of the SLO
process.
3. I know how to establish baseline data and
determine growth.
4. I know the components of a SMART goal.
5. I know how growth ratings are calculated.
6. I can determine the quality of an SLO using
the SLO Quality Checklist.
7. I know how an SLO connects to teacher
evaluation.
Parking Lot
• Are there any
post-its?
• Does anyone
have a post it
they can
answer?
REVIEW
• What is an S.L.O.?
- A teacher-‐driven goal or set of goals that establish expectations for
student academic growth over a period of time. The specific, rigorous,
realistic and measurable goal(s) must be based on baseline data and
represent the most important learning that needs to occur during the
instructional period. SLOs are aligned to applicable Common Core, state
or national standards.
• What are the 4 steps
–
–
–
–
1. S.L.O. Development
2. S.L.O. Approval
3. Ongoing Communication
4. Preparing for Summative
REVIEW
• Where do I get my baseline data? How do I show
growth?
– Pretest… Compare pretest and posttest
• What does S.M.A.R.T. mean?
- S pecific M easurable A ppropriate R igorous/ realistic T imebound
• What are the three types of growth goals I can
write?
• Mastery
• Differentiated
• Shared
Growth Goal
Growth Goal:
Establish
expectations for
student growth.
What can I expect my students to achieve? Establish rigorous
expectations for student performance. (1b 1c)
Think-Pair-Share
Write an example growth goal in three different ways.
See next slide for those examples again…
Growth Goal Example
Statements
By the end of the first semester, All students will reach
90% proficiency in simplifying algebraic expressions
and solving algebraic equations that are linear,
quadratic, rational, and radical.
By the end of the first semester, all students that
obtained a score in the D or F range will improve by at
least two letter grades and all students that obtained
a score in the C or B range will improve by one letter
grade. A score in the A range should improve their
percentage.
By the end of the school year, all students in the
middle school will show at least a 15% improvement in
their score on the assessment dealing with the
probability and statistics standards for their grade
level.
Class
Mastery
Differentiate
d Growth
Shared
Performanc
e
Provide Rational
Provide
How do the content, baseline data, assessment and growth goal
Rationale:
support student progress and growth? Describe why you chose to
Describe how
develop this SLO. (1a, 1f)
your SLO benefits
student learning.
The students need to work on their algebraic reasoning skills. (After
last year, a significant amount of students were not on grade level in
this strand, according to the MAP math test results in May.)
Provide Rationale
Provide
How do the content, baseline data, assessment and growth goal
Rationale:
support student progress and growth? Describe why you chose to
Describe how
develop this SLO. (1a, 1f)
your SLO benefits
student learning.
Think back to last year, how would
you justify choosing your goal?
Think of a possible high need area.
Think-Pair-Share in 5!
Learning Strategies
Learning
Strategies:
Describe your
plan to meet
student needs?
How will you help students attain the goal? Provide any specific
actions that will lead to goal attainment. (1b, 1e, 1f, 4a)
Questioning and scaffolding of strategies; continued use of mathematical
practice standards in discourse and practice; goal setting by students and
student/teacher conferences about benchmark tests, goals, and direction of
student’s learning; differentiated groups depending on assigned task (like
learning abilities and varied learning abilities used for varied small group
work tasks)
What’s the
plan for
success?
Will others
be
involved?
How will you help?
Tutor time?
Will you
use
groups?
Learning Strategies
Learning
Strategies:
Describe your
plan to meet
student needs?
How will you help students attain the goal? Provide any specific
actions that will lead to goal attainment. (1b, 1e, 1f, 4a)
Think back to last year, share how
you met students’ needs. Think of a
ThinkPair-Share in 5!
possible high need area.
Step 2
Can meet with groups
of teachers to discuss
SLOs at one time.
Meet with
the
Sign and date!
evaluator
Explain your data and
growth plan.
Revise if
necessary
The SLO Process
SLO
Development
Answer 4 questions
Prioritize Learning Content
SLO Approval
What do I want my students to be able to
know and do?
Analyze data and develop baselines
Where are my students starting?
Ongoing
Communication
Prepare for
Summative
Select or develop an assessment
What assessments are available?
Write growth goal
What can I expect my students to achieve?
Winter Benchmark
A “Progress Update” could look
like this…
Progress Update: How will you help students attain the goal? Provide any specific
Describe student actions that will lead to goal attainment. (1b, 1e, 1f, 4a)
progress toward
95% of students passing practice quizzes and tests.
the growth goal.
On track?
How will you know
where your kids are
at?
Same assessment?
Informal
data?
“Strategy Modification” could
look like this…
Strategy
Modification:
If necessary,
document
changes in
strategy.
Does data suggest I need to adjust my instruction strategy? Describe
how you plan to meet the goal. (1e, 4a)
Students who struggle with formative assessment have assistance in
study hall, after school and through flipped classroom resources.
Students may be recommended for tutoring or ICU. I documented
both student meeting and home contacts.
Do I need
to adjust?
Change up
instructional
strategies?
Keep on
keeping
on?
SLO Adjustment
SLO Adjustment:
If justified,
describe the
changes to the
SLO.
Are there circumstances beyond the teacher’s control that will
impact the growth goal? If needed, attach a revised SLO (1b, 4a)
No change.
Sign and Date
Any reason
to change
the goal?
Did circumstances
change?
Revise if
needed.
The SLO Process
SLO
Development
Answer 4 questions
Prioritize Learning Content
SLO Approval
What do I want my students to be able to
know and do?
Analyze data and develop baselines
Where are my students starting?
Ongoing
Communication
Prepare for
Summative
Select or develop an assessment
What assessments are available?
Write growth goal
What can I expect my students to achieve?
Teacher Student Growth
Rating
PERFORMANCE
CATEGORY
DESCRIPTION
Low
Less than 65% goal attainment
Expected 65% to 85% goal attainment
High
86% to 100% percent attainment
Scores for 80% Goal
• Sample SLO: At the end of the term, all students
will show measurable progress in HS Chemistry as
shown by the American Chemical Society National
High School Final Exam. 80% of all students will
obtain a score of 26 or better on the exam. (26 is
considered average).
Low
Less than 65% goal attainment
(.80 x .65 = Less than 52%)
Expected
65% to 85% goal attainment
(.80 x .65 = 52%) (.80 x .85 = 68%)
High
86% to 100% percent attainment
(.80 x .86 - 69%) (.80 x 100 = 80%)
Scores for 70% Goal
• Sample SLO: At the end of the term, all students
will show measurable progress in HS Chemistry as
shown by the American Chemical Society National
High School Final Exam. 70% of all students will
obtain a score of 26 or better on the exam. (26 is
considered average).
Low
Less than 65% goal attainment (Less than 46%)
Expected
65% to 85% goal attainment (46% - 59%)
High
86% to 100% percent attainment (60% - 70%)
Just a quick glance side by side
Scores for 80% Goal
Scores for 70% Goal
•
•
Sample SLO: At the end of the term, all
students will show measurable progress in HS
Chemistry as shown by the American Chemical
Society National High School Final Exam. 80%
of all students will obtain a score of 26 or
better on the exam. (26 is considered average).
Low
Expected
High
Less than 65% goal attainment
(.80 x .65 = Less than 52%)
65% to 85% goal attainment
(.80 x .65 = 53%) (.80 x .85 = 68%)
86% to 100% percent attainment
(.80 x .86 - 69%) (.80 x 100 = 80%)
Sample SLO: At the end of the term, all
students will show measurable progress in HS
Chemistry as shown by the American Chemical
Society National High School Final Exam. 70%
of all students will obtain a score of 26 or
better on the exam. (26 is considered average).
Low
Expected
High
Less than 65% goal attainment
(Less than 46%)
65% to 85% goal attainment
(46% - 59%)
86% to 100% percent attainment
(60% - 70%)
Step 4
For the 2013-2014 school year, I can expect measurable growth for all of my
students in fiction/non fiction stories/texts. 90% of my students will be at
benchmark as measured by the DIBELS Next assessment.
For example: For 80%
growth – use the
formula.
Low growth is
less than 65%
High growth is 86-100%
of your goal
Figure where your
scores must be
according to your
growth goal.
Expected
growth is
65 – 85%
End of Year Data
High Growth
High Growth:
What does high growth mean? Detail end-of-course achievement
This growth goal levels that equate to high growth. ( 4b)
was 86% to 100%
At the end of the year, 21 of 24 students passed all 4 sub tests.
attained.
87.5% of my students passed the assessment.
Explain at your table
how you determined
student growth.
Don’t forget to
celebrate!
What is the high
growth range?
This
teacher
made high
growth!
During break think about the SLO process… share
out as we return… a video is our signal to begin!
I’m not the only squirrely
one… ha ha
• Bringing us back
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOcHmsB0ZQc
• S.L.O Process: a highlight, an
insight, and an uptight
“Professional Growth” could
look like…
Professional
Growth.
Detail what you
learned.
What worked? What should be refined? Describe the support you
need to improve instruction and student learning. (1s, 4a)
Having a combination of group and individual activities was
successful, as well as multiple opportunities for students to practice
listening and speaking with various resources.
What needs to change
for next year?
What support can
be provided?
Detail what
you
learned!
Principal Student
Growth Rating
PERFORMANCE
CATEGORY
DESCRIPTION
Low
Less than 80% of teachers earned
expected growth
Expected
80-90% of teachers earned expected
growth
High
91-100% of teachers earned expected
growth
Chunking today
– I know the definition of an SLO.
– I understand the four steps of the SLO process.
– I know the components of a SMART goal.
– I know how to establish baseline data, determine
growth and calculate growth ratings.
– I can determine the quality of an SLO based on
the SLO Quality Checklist.
– I know how SLOs connect to teacher evaluation.
REVIEW
• What is an S.L.O.?
- A teacher-‐driven goal or set of goals that establish expectations for
student academic growth over a period of time. The specific, rigorous,
realistic and measurable goal(s) must be based on baseline data and
represent the most important learning that needs to occur during the
instructional period. SLOs are aligned to applicable Common Core, state
or national standards.
• What are the 4 steps
–
–
–
–
1. S.L.O. Development
2. S.L.O. Approval
3. Ongoing Communication
4. Preparing for Summative
REVIEW
• Where do I get my baseline data? How do I show
growth?
– Pretest… Compare pretest and posttest
• What does S.M.A.R.T. mean?
- S pecific M easurable A ppropriate R igorous/ realistic T imebound
• What are the three types of growth goals I can
write?
• Mastery
• Differentiated
• Shared
Chunk # 3
PEER REVIEW
Peer Review
• Pull out your SLO Quality Checklist
• Read it closely and use it to evaluate
your SLO
• Develop at least 1:
– Question
– Comment
– Observation
Chunking today
– I know the definition of an SLO.
– I understand the four steps of the SLO process.
– I know the components of a SMART goal.
– I know how to establish baseline data, determine
growth and calculate growth ratings.
– I can determine the quality of an SLO based on
the SLO Quality Checklist.
– I know how SLOs connect to teacher evaluation.
REVIEW
• How do I determine if my S.L.O. is
written well?
- Use the S.L.O. quality checklist… perhaps keep this tool handy while
writing S.L.O.’s
• Linking us to tomorrow’s visit, see
next slide!
Take out this “tool”
• Go to SDAP power point to share
this resource, if needed.
• https://sdap.emetric.net/Portal
•
SLO & EVALUATION
CHUNK 4
Remember from earlier in the day?
Look at the next few slides!
This is where the SLO’s plug in to your
teacher evaluation. 
Determining Teacher Effectiveness
Using multiple measures of professional practice and student learning
South Dakota Framework for Teaching
Student Growth
Domain 1
Domain 2
Domain 3
Domain 4
SLOs
Planning and
Preparation
Classroom
Environment
Instruction
Professional
Responsibilities
State Assessments
• Classroom Observations and Evidence of Effective Practice
• Components from Each of the 4 Domains
(as one measure if available)
District Assessments
Evaluator-Approved
Assessments
• At Least 8 Components Chosen Based on District or School Priorities
Professional Practice Rating
Growth Rating
Summative Rating Matrix
Professional Oversight: Is the rating fair and accurate based on the evidence
and data shared by the teacher
Differentiated Performance Categories
Below Expectations
Meets Expectations
Exceeds Expectations
Summative Scoring Matrix
Summative Teacher Effectiveness Rating Categories
Below
Expectations
Meets
Expectations
Exceeds
Expectations
Judgment
Rating Subject
✪ to Review
Teacher A
Summative Teacher Effectiveness Rating Categories
Below
Expectations
Meets
Expectations
Exceeds
Expectations
Judgment
Rating Subject
✪ to Review
Teacher B
Judgment
Rating Subject
to Review
Summative Teacher Effectiveness Rating Categories
Below
Expectations
Meets
Expectations
Exceeds
Expectations
Judgment
Rating Subject
✪ to Review
Teacher C
Judgment
Rating Subject
to Review
Summative Teacher Effectiveness Rating Categories
Below
Expectations
Meets
Expectations
Exceeds
Expectations
Judgment
Rating Subject
✪ to Review
Make the connection
• Find a person who has a birthday in
the same month… or nearest your
month…
• Use 1 minute, then another 1
minute to discuss the connection
between the Charlotte Danielson
Framework and S.L.O.’s
The Aspiration: Improve Instruction
and Student Learning
1. Encourage meaningful, in-depth dialogue focused on
improving instruction
2. Provide regular, timely, useful feedback that guides
professional growth
3. Support a culture in which data drives instructional decisions
4. Establish clear expectations for teacher performance
5. Use multiple measures to meaningfully determine and
differentiate teacher performance
6. Provide a fair, flexible, research-based model that informs
personnel decisions.
Parking Lot Activity
• Are there any
post-its left?
• Does anyone
have a post it
they can
answer?
REVIEW
• How do I determine if my S.L.O. is
written well?
- Use the S.L.O. quality checklist… perhaps keep this tool handy while
writing S.L.O.’s
• How do S.L.O.’s connect to teacher
evaluation?
-evaluations use a summative scoring matrix that includes evaluating
“professional practice” according to the domains in Charlotte Danielson’s
Framework and “student growth rating” that is based on the S.L.O.
determined by the teacher
On more glance at where
S.L.O.’s fit in 
Summative Teacher Effectiveness Rating Categories
Below
Expectations
Meets
Expectations
Exceeds
Expectations
Judgment
Rating Subject
✪ to Review
RATE YOURSELF:
use blue sticky note
1. I know the definition of an SLO.
2. I understand the four steps of the SLO
process.
3. I know how to establish baseline data and
determine growth.
4. I know the components of a SMART goal.
5. I know how growth ratings are calculated.
6. I can determine the quality of an SLO using
the SLO Quality Checklist.
7. I know how an SLO connects to teacher
evaluation.
Did we meet our SLO?
By the end of the day, all of the participants in
the training will rate themselves as a 3 or 4 for
each of the seven statements given.
.
Where did you land for our
S.L.O OR S.M.A.R.T. GOAL?
4
I know what an SLO is.
I know how an SLO connects to teacher evaluation.
I know how growth ratings are calculated.
I know how to establish baseline data and determine
growth.
I understand the four steps of the SLO process.
I know the components of a SMART goal.
I can determine if an SLO meets SD criteria.
3
2
1
In a nutshell, do you have a plan for
your SLO? Write your action steps on
the back of your Take Away Window.
Are we moving up the
mountain?
Where are you now in your
comfort level with SLO’s?
Going from the
valley of confusion
up the slope of
understanding?
(Top 20 lingo here.
Giggle)
EVALUATION
FAQ’s from First SLO Trainings-share?
• https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/
slo day1
• Make sure to complete stipend form
for today!  (Each day we will fill
one out.)
I would love to hear your feedback about
today’s presentation!
If you have a couple moments (sticky note,
verbally, email), please share with Tammy Jo
about the things we should
CLOSURE
A. Definitely Keep.
B. Possibly Change.
Sparkling in education with you! Thank you,
Tammy Jo Schlechter 
Tammy Jo needs to take attendance before her guests leave! 
[email protected]

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