haighBilingual-Program-2013

Report
Bulgogi and
Bilingualism
GEMMA HAIGH
CAMPSIE PUBLIC SCHOOL NSW
A F M LT A C O N F E R E N C E
J U LY 2 0 1 3
Campsie Public
School is one of four
NSW bilingual
schools.
The school’s
language focus is
Korean and the
language is taught
each day to selected
classes.
The bilingual
program is offered
as an option
alongside the
traditional
curriculum.
School Profile
Campsie Public School is a large primary school in the inner
w e s t o f S y d n ey, i n t h e c i t y o f C a n t e r b u r y, N S W.
The city is home to over 130 nationalities, with a majority of
its residents being born overseas.
The school serves a diverse multicultural community where
97% of the students come from a non -English speaking
background and 42 languages are spoken by the school
c o m m u n i t y.
 720 students
 39 different nationalities
 12 different languages taught at school
 5% Korean language background
The Bilingual
Program is one
element in a
comprehensive
whole school
approach to
language studies
and Asian Literacy.
 Korean Bilingual Program – introduced in 2010
 12 Community Languages – Korean, Chinese,
Vietnamese, Arabic, Indonesian, Hindi, Punjabi,
Bengali, Fijian, Samoan, Tongan and Rarotongan.
 Korean Connected Classroom Program
introduced in 2011 through ConnectKorea –
Becoming Asia Literate Grant
 Established a sister school relationship in Busan,
South Korea in 2013 through KoreaAusConnexion
Project
 Established a sister school relationship in
Cheongju, South Korea in 2013 through AEF
Bridge Project
Philosophy and Vision
built up Asian languages programs
 delivered creative solutions in delivering sustainable
language education programs
 ensured Asia prepared teachers and school leaders
 c r e a t e d t a s k f o r c e t o e m b e d A s i a a n d A u s t r a l i a ’s e n g a g e m e n t
with Asia in classroom curriculum
 built awareness and demand for Asia skills among parents
and students

 Enacting an Asia Literacy action plan
Asia literacy perspectives – current and new
curriculum
 Asia focused resources and events
Preparing teachers and leaders in Asian languages and
cultural understanding
 5 teachers undertaking Graduate Diploma Modern
Languages through Primary Asian Language Training
Scholarship Program 2011 - 2013
 3 teachers attended South Korea Teacher Education
Visit 2011
 12 teachers completed Graduate Certificate of
Teaching Asia 2011-2012
Teaching of Asian Languages
 4 of the 5 national priority languages taught
(Chinese, Indonesian, Hindi and Korean) as well as
other non-priority Asian languages (Vietnamese,
Punjabi, Bengali, Arabic and Pacific Islander)
Korean Bilingual Program
Innovation – sharing resources, partnerships





 The initiative has been prompted by the need to
increase the number of students achieving fluency in
priority Asian languages. It reflects Asia's importance
to Australia's future economic and social prosperity
and the likelihood that many Australian workers will
need to be comfortable in the use of an Asian
language. The program is also a response to the
increasing number of parents wanting to send their
children to a primary school offering a strong Asian
language program.
 The program is expected to give primary students a
head start on language studies in later years, improve
their understanding of other cultures and, in the longer
term, increase their job opportunities. It builds on a
broad body of research which indicates that bilingual
education stimulates intellectual development,
generates greater flexibility in thinking, gives learners
a better understanding of their first language, and
develops listening skills.
Curriculum Leadership Journal, 27 November 2009.
Process
The NSW Government invested $2.25
million over four years in the
establishment of a Bilingual Schools
Program for the four priority Asian
languages: Indonesian, Japanese,
Korean and Mandarin Chinese.
 Currently five classes (one class per grade in
The study of
languages at
Campsie Public
School provides
opportunities for
students to
become more
accepting of
diversity, more
respectful of
others and better
equips the
students to
engage with
others and
participate fully in
a globalised world.
Kindergarten, Year One, Year Two ,Year Three and Year
Four) are being taught as bilingual classes, progressing
to K-6 by 2015. These classes receive approximately 80
minutes per day Korean instruction. Korean is taught
through the context of the thematic unit of the grade,
focussing on the HSIE and Science outcomes.
 The Community Languages program at Campsie Public
School ensures that students have the opportunity of
acquiring, maintaining and developing a community
language in Korean, Mandarin, Vietnamese and Arabic.
The additional LOTE (Languages Other Than English)
program includes 6 languages and focuses on
developing language proficiency and promoting
intercultural understanding. Currently twelve
languages are taught with the aim that every student
in the school will study a language other than English.
Who
with?
• With Kindergarten and Year 1 only in
2010
• Expanding into the following years of
primary school each year
• Kindergarten –Year 6 in 2015
Who is
teaching?
• primary trained specialist language
teachers, in conjunction with native
speaking volunteers.
• for one and a half hours each school
day
What
and how?
• direct and integrated language
teaching and learning
• team teaching with the class teacher
in subjects such as HSIE, PDHPE and
Creative Arts to extend the language
learning environment within a balanced
primary education program.
Practice and Pedagogy
 ASIAN LITERACY
 SUPPORTING ENGLISH (SECOND LANGUAGE)
ACQUISITION
 LO T E – E D U C AT I O N O F W H O L E C H I L D
 TE CHNO LO GY
 The school annually promotes Asian Literacy
Week; engaging students, teachers and the
parent community by helping to build skills and
knowledge of Asia in all areas.
 The school celebrates Hangul day each October;
showcasing student work, art and performances
to the school, parent and local community.
 An annual school festival day – including food
stalls, costume parade, dances and performances
– highlights and celebrates the many
nationalities of the school community.
 Classes regularly visit the Korean Cultural
Education Centre. These visits provide an
enjoyable learning experience while immersing
students in the Korean culture.
 Continued and effective use is made of our video
conferencing facilities, which allows staff and
classes to link with other schools, as well as
specialist facilities such as universities and art
galleries.
 Through the Becoming Asian Literate Schools
Grant, the school has developed an innovative
program to teach Korean language and culture
using ipads and Web2 tools.
 The Korean language program currently uses the
connected classroom link to provide lessons,
teaching Korean for one hour per week, to
students of primary school age. The three schools
involved are Merriwa Central School, Newington
Public School and Juk-Seong Elementary School
in Busan, South Korea.
Class
time
• 5 hours p/w
• 4 hours COGs & 1 hour
LOTE
• primary trained
language specialist
Extra
Curricular
Extra
Curricular
• Korean Traditional
Dance or Drumming
• Korean instruction
• 40 min before school
activity by the
specialist
• Taekwondo in
• Korean instruction
• 40 min before school
activity by the master
STAGE 2 SCOPE & SEQUENCE: AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM
Term
EVEN YEARS
Unit
Outcomes
Korean Focus
CAPA
PDHPE
English
1
Information
ST2-15I
ST2-5WT
Online safety
and etiquette
Dance
Drama (ads)
Safety
Swimming
Sun protection
Persuasive
Texts:
advertising &
review
2
Earth & Space
Telling time,
months of the
year, seasonal
changes
Shadow & light
art
Informative:
Explanation &
procedure
Mapping
Time
3
First Contacts
ST2-8ES
ST2-9ES
ST2-7PW
ST2-4WS
ST2-5WT
HT2-3
HT2-4
HT2-5
Mythology of
Dangun, the
progenitor of
Korean people
Visual Arts
before & after
images
Bush dancing
Informative :
Recount &
narrative
Mapping
4
Living World
ST2-10LW
ST2-11LW
ST2-4WS
Human life
cycle, food
chain
Music
Botanical
drawings
Informative:
Information
Report
Imaginative:
poetry
Data (tables)
Sport in
Schools
Child
protection
Maths
STAGE 2 SCOPE & SEQUENCE: AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM
Term
ODD YEARS
Unit
Outcomes
Korean Focus
CAPA
PDHPE
English
Maths
1
Being
Australian
HT2-2
HT2-5
Aboriginal
story
Dance
Values
Swimming
Persuasive
Imaginative:
aboriginal
stories
Data (graphs)
2
Local
Environments
ST2-14BE
ST2-4WS
ST2-5WT
Designing a
town
Drama (team
work)
Road safety
Persuasive:
debate
Informative:
description
Length & Area
Mapping
3
Products &
Machines
Cookie factory, Bicycle
from wheat to drawings/art
cookies
Safety &
hygiene
Healthy eating
Drug
education
Informative:
explanation
& procedure
Measurement:
mass, V&C
4
Understanding
Culture
ST2-16P
ST2-12MW
ST2-13MW
ST2-6PW
ST2-4WS
ST2-5WT
HT2-1
Korean folk
stories
Group work
Values &
beliefs
Sport in
Schools
Child
protection
Imaginative:
traditional
narratives
Mapping
Music:
traditional
songs
Purpose and Outcomes
"ONE OF THE MAJOR BENEFITS OF LEARNING A
SECOND LANGUAGE IS THE STRAIGHT BRAIN
P O W E R , T H E C O G N I T I V E P O W E R , T H AT A R I S E S …
YOU END UP WITH BETTER OVERALL BRAIN
FUNCTION AS A CONSEQUENCE OF THE CHALLENGE
OF LEARNING AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE IN THOSE
E A R LY P R E S C H O O L T O P R I M A R Y S C H O O L Y E A R S . “
IAN HICKIE
DIRECTOR OF BRAIN & MIND RESEARCH INSTITUTE
SYDNEY UNIVERSITY, NSW
Assessment
LOTE assessed by
specialist language
teacher
HSIE/Science
component assessed by
classroom teacher
Resources
Present Position
• I N C R E A S E D PA R T I C I PAT I O N I N B I L I N G U A L P R O G R A M
• ENGAGEMENT OF STUDENTS
• CONNECTION WITH COMMUNITY
• O N G O I N G A N A LY S I S O F R E S U LT S
• LO C A L , S TAT E , N AT I O N A L A N D I N T E R N AT I O N A L
CONNECTIONS
2010 2011 2012 2013
Kinder
Kinder
Kinder
Kinder
25
Year 1
23
Year 1
26
Year 1
49
Year 1
22
25
Year 2
25
Year 2
26
Year 2
22
24
Year 3
25
Year 3
18
24
Year 4
20
From the
teachers
 “The bilingual program provides language skills
as well as an understanding and respect of
another culture.”
 “I’m amazed at the speed of language
acquisition, particularly as for many students, this
is their third language.”
 “This has been one of the best things to happen
to our school; there’s a real buzz.”
From the
parents
 “Learning a new language has shown my son his
true potential.”
 “All areas of learning have improved since his
involvement in the program.”
 “I’m excited at the thought of how this will
benefit my child’s future.”
 “My daughter now has a love of all things
Korean!”
From the
students
 “I can sing and count in Korean, you know.”




(Kinder)
“I like Korean because I like writing the alphabet.”
(Year 1)
“Sometimes I play in Korean and other times in
English.” (Year 2)
“I like it that I can order in Korean at Korean
restaurants now!” (Year 3)
“I wanted to learn Korean because of K-pop but
now I want to learn so I can speak another
language.” (Year 4)
Post 2013
• S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y O F L A N G U A G E P R O G R A M S
• I N C R E A S E D PA R T I C I PAT I O N I N B I L I N G U A L P R O G R A M
• O N G O I N G A N A LY S I S O F R E S U LT S
• FEEDER HIGH SCHOOLS TO INCLUDE LANGUAGE
PROGRAM
• SCHOOL FUNDING OF PROGRAM; BUILDING ON CURRENT
C A PA C I T Y
• I N C R E A S E O F N S W S T U D E N T S L E A R N I N G KO R E A N
A bright
and
colourful
future

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