Issues Challenges and Opp

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• Workshop Objectives
• Status of K12
• Impact of K12 on private education
• Current remedies being considered
• Next Actions: Results of the October
26, 2012 ADB-DepEd Meeting
• Get the participants to understand PPP education
models for Senior High School: ESC, vouchers, and
concessions.
• Identify a range of costs/subsidies per student, as
requested by the DepEd.
• Get to a short list of key factors and risk factors
acceptable to the participants, to help DepEd
develop a PPP model in more detail.
STATUS OF K+12
 Bill approved on second reading last
October…just last November 19 it was
approved for third and final reading.
 The government is ready to implement the
K+12 program … DepED Secretary assurance.
 DepEd continues to address the lingering
problems of shortage in classrooms, qualified
teachers, sanitation facilities, textbooks, and
school seats.
UPDATE FROM K TO12 STEERING COMMITTEE
• Committee is composed
of members from the
DepED, CHED and TESDA
• Responsible for gathering
necessary information
that will supplement the
queries on th proposed
model opted to use “K to
12” which highlights not
only the additional years
in basic education but the
design of the curriculum
as well.
IMPACT OF K + 12 ON
PRIVATE EDUCATION
Issues, Challenges and Opportunities
for Private Education
• Resource constraint issues for DepEd
–Need
for DepEd to meet classroom, building and teacher development
demands
•
Shortages in Qualified teachers
–These
are only for Grades 1-10
–These needs geometrically increase with introduction of Grades 11 and 12
• Sustainability Issues for Some Basic Education Schools
–Private
HS at capacity need to build to handle grades 11 and 12 (SHS)
–Many HS don’t have finances or space to put up additional classrooms and
resources
• Opportunities for Others
–Build
for 11 and 12; offer its services to others
–Expand mission, through reaching out to more
As the number of enrollees are expected to
decline by 2016, the NPV of losses for private
schools and colleges nationwide amounting to
P158 billion
― Lost cohorts during transition
― Smaller incoming cohorts (reduction of 16%) due to
grades 11 and 12)
 The potential displacement of college
professors and tech-voc instructors during
the introduction of senior high school from
2016 onwards.
CURRENT REMEDIES BEING
CONSIDERED
1. Move Into Voc-Tech
• Voc-Tech expansion
–HEIs considering expanding into voc-tech
–HS graduates at 18 may opt to forego
college, look into short-term training
–Market seen to grow?
3. Improve Student Financing
• Expanding ESC
• Introducing a national student loan program
― student loans in the Philippines at close to
zero penetration, compared to average of 38%
in ASEAN countries
― 2 bills now in the Senate (Angara) and the
House (Romulo)
4. PPPs in Education
PUBLIC
NEED classrooms,
teachers and expertise
for Grades 11 and 12
PRIVATE
HAVE classrooms,
teachers and expertise
for Grades 11 and 12
4. PPPs in Education (Con’t)
• DepEd in principle approves PPPs in education
(K-12 Subcommittee on Transition looking into
PPPs)
• PEAC Board Resolution No. Series of 2011
approved the creation of a FAPE Education PPP
steering team to provide needed services and
collaborate with DepED’s PPP technical working
groups
Proposed Timeframe
2012
May to June
Organization
of the FAPE
Education
PPP Steering
Team.
Team starts.
July to
November
2013
October
November
to
December
January to
February
Conduct of
DepEd
Small group
Roundtable
consultations
Meeting
in coordination
with DepED
PPP Team and
ADB EISDP
Team
Regional
Conferences
and Series of
One-day
Workshops
Crafting of a
proposed
Education
PPP Policy
for DepED
approval
March and
December
Completion of PPP
policy by Philippine
Government
“Bidding” and private
sector invitations
hopefully by 2014
Capacity-building
2013-2014
Private sector PPP
participants hopefully
by Jan 2015
Some discussion
about early starts for
PPPs
NEXT STEPS
October 26 DepEd Roundtable
DepEd with assistance from ADB is now developing a PPP
policy for education. Among the key activities are
 Design an expanded ESC for Senior High School
 Review PPP models for SHS
 ESC
 Vouchers
 Concessions
 Examine price at which private sector will participate
 Examine capacity of private sector to absorb high
school students
PPPs in Education - Ongoing
Next Actions:
Consult with private schools and come up
with price and capacity estimates
Thank You
EXTRA SLIDES
Number of schools
– 38,351 public elementary schools,
– 7,268 high schools
Participation rate
– 91 percent for elementary.
– 62 percent for high school
How many senior high school students or enrollees
is the DepEd expecting by 2016? Thirty-two
percent of 1.1 million would be the yearly average.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR
PPP EXPANSION
• GASTPE / Expanded
ESC
• K to 12 Senior High
School PPP
Schemes
2013 GASTPE Budget
• Php 7.0 billion in 2013 vs Php 6.3 billion in
2012
• 2013 budget sufficient for 1 million
grantees.
Source: Usec Varela’s PPt
Presentation: “Enriching
PPP in Education”
Issues in the GASTPE Expansion
• Demand vs. Supply Issues
• Distribution among schools
• Appropriate grantee selection process
• Will it increase enrollment in private
schools?
Source: Usec Varela’s PPt
Presentation: “Enriching
PPP in Education”
Government Objectives
in Expanding GASTPE
• Decongest public schools
• Minimize cost of expanding education services
• Improve quality of education for beneficiaries
• Improve quality of education for nonbeneficiaries by improving conditions in the
public schools.
Source: Usec Varela’s PPt
Presentation: “Enriching
PPP in Education”
Wrong Grantee Selection Will Not
Help Private Schools
• Inappropriate grantees are those students who
would have enrolled in a private school, even
without government subsidy.
• If subsidy is given to these students, the
enrollment in private schools will not increase.
• The revenue to the school will remain the same.
Gov’t subsidy will be enjoyed by private
households.
Source: Usec Varela’s PPt
Presentation: “Enriching
PPP in Education”
• if the Committee or the Department for that
matter, has the formula as to how the senior
high schools shall be allocated?
• those who can go to college under the new
scheme must be a graduate of senior high school.
• paano ngayon iyong mga ibang barangay na may
junior high school, walang senior high school? So,
the problem of access is there. We will be back to
square one, Mr. Speaker. So, my first question is,
what is the formula in determining—in this high
school, mayroon tayong senior,
• The DepEd will also be providing the voucher
system and the service contracting to augment
the deficiency of present existing facilities in
areas that cannot provide, as you say, senior high
school.
• senior high schools will be built in catchment
areas so that graduates will have somewhere to
go for the particular example that you have
mentioned.
• The second question is, if you have a voucher, is the amount
involved uniform? I mean, if not throughout the Philippines, at
least, in specific localities or provinces. Kung uniform, ang ibig ko
pong sabihin kung iyong isang voucher, for example, ang cost is
P15,000 yearly, ito po ba ay P15,000 sa lahat?
• REP. OCAMPO. Mr. Speaker, at the moment, the Government
Assistance to Students and Teachers in Private Education (GASTPE)
costs the government P10,000 for the National Capital Region (NCR)
and P6,500 for outside of Metro Manila. In the discussion regarding
this matter, we were assured that the DepEd is studying the
increase of the GASTPE subsidy for our students, in fact, to P22,000
per student in 2016 which is more than half of what they are
providing for at the moment for this GASTPE subsidy.
how is this public-private
partnership program being done?
that the public-private partnership program of the
government will help solve the shortage of classrooms in our
basic educational system. My question is:
• how is this PPP modality being done and implemented?
• How is the distribution of the school buildings being
done—will it be concentrated in the urban centers like
Metro Manila and others to the prejudice of the rural areas
which need more of these classrooms as those in Metro
Manila?
• The urban centers are being provided with assistance by
the local government units which have some
resources/some remittances to augment the funding of the
Department of Education for the basic educational
requirements of our students.
Currently, the DepEd is mapping in the whole country
through the regional directors, where is the acute need
for classrooms. I would like to reiterate that by 2013, we
would have built the 30,000 classrooms. The question of
the Gentleman from Bohol is: What are the criteria in
choosing where to build the new classrooms? It is entirely
on a need basis. The DepEd will build the classrooms
where there is a need.
• How is the PPP being done? What is the mode of
repayment, et cetera?
• PPP, the initial areas that were chosen were Regions I, IV-A and III
on a pilot basis….. P15 billion …. mode of repayment…10-year
period…rate of interest
• The program of the PPP is to build, lease and transfer. From the
very start, it was already determined—what the cost would be to
build these classrooms. Therefore, there will not be any fluctuation
on the interest because the terms have been determined and
agreed upon from the very start.
• The intention of the Department is to pay, to regularize one-third of
the 22,000 kindergarten teachers by 2013 and, progressively, until
we would have regularized the whole 22,000.
• The DepEd is ready and that is the reason we implemented the
policy that for school year 2012 to 2013, Grade I and Grade VII will
be using the new curriculum. By 2016, with the amount of P42.3
billion, increasing to P50 billion plus for 2017, projecting a high
growth scenario and like I have earlier mentioned, we are going to
address all the shortages in classrooms, teachers, seats, books and
sanitation facilities before 2016.
• all gaps will be addressed by 2014. The creative programs of the
DepEd in enlisting the support of all stakeholders in the Adopt-ASchool program, the private sector, the LGU funds, the Special
Education Fund from the LGU, the donor communities, the donor
institutions and financial institutions, will help us address these
gaps.
• Absorptive capacity of the DepEd has been questioned in terms of
building the classrooms, providing the teachers and preparing the
materials for the K to 12 Program.
• DepED’s commitment to bridge the gap in classrooms, teachers,
seats, textbooks and sanitation facilities by 2014.
• We started with the implementation of the PPP that commits P15
billion over a period of 10 years to deliver 9,000 classrooms.
• Question of readiness and preparedness of DepED in collaboration
with stakeholders in implementing K to 12.
• absorptive capacity of the system
Number of schools
• 38,351 public elementary schools,
• 7,268 high schools
Participation rate
• 91 percent for elementary.
• 62 percent for high school
• how many senior high school students or enrollees is
the DepEd expecting by 2016? Thirty-two percent of
1.1 million would be the yearly average.
CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
(PESA)
• In this regard, the education system needs to have sufficient classrooms
ready at the opening of school year 2011-2012 to pave the way for the
universalization of kindergarten.
• DepEd plans to pass on K+12 smoothly into the next administration in2016 when
the first batch of senior students enroll in senior high or Grades 11 to 12.Through
this program, DepEd will have to overhaul the curriculum and
solve the shortages of teachers, classrooms, textbooks,
and other problems.
• While the government is convinced that this is a necessary and a long-overdue
step, notwithstanding its obstacles mainly in the financing of education,
some quarters believes otherwise. Hence, there is a need for a continuous
monitoring and evaluation of the program as it progresses and casts the net as
wide as possible in consulting key sectors as it is the biggest education reform
that will be undertaken.
• School-community partnerships on the
ground have shown the way forward in
making schools perform better.
• Government and the private sector must
ensure that these islands of excellence
become the norm for all by scaling up these
successful initiatives.
• Public-Private Partnerships or PPPs must
indeed become part of our education
reform effort.
• As PBEd and others stakeholders of private
education has done, FAPE also commits to
facilitating, encouraging, initiating and
seeing through such partnerships.
EXTRA SLIDES
OPPORTUNITIES FOR
PPP EXPANSION
• GASTPE / Expanded
ESC
• K to 12 Senior High
School PPP
Schemes
2013 GASTPE Budget
• Php 7.0 billion in 2013 vs Php 6.3 billion in
2012
• 2013 budget sufficient for 1 million
grantees.
Source: Usec Varela’s PPt
Presentation: “Enriching
PPP in Education”
Issues in the GASTPE Expansion
• Demand vs. Supply Issues
• Distribution among schools
• Appropriate grantee selection process
• Will it increase enrollment in private
schools?
Source: Usec Varela’s PPt
Presentation: “Enriching
PPP in Education”
Government Objectives
in Expanding GASTPE
• Decongest public schools
• Minimize cost of expanding education services
• Improve quality of education for beneficiaries
• Improve quality of education for nonbeneficiaries by improving conditions in the
public schools.
Source: Usec Varela’s PPt
Presentation: “Enriching
PPP in Education”
Wrong Grantee Selection Will Not
Help Private Schools
• Inappropriate grantees are those students who
would have enrolled in a private school, even
without government subsidy.
• If subsidy is given to these students, the
enrollment in private schools will not increase.
• The revenue to the school will remain the same.
Gov’t subsidy will be enjoyed by private
households.
Source: Usec Varela’s PPt
Presentation: “Enriching
PPP in Education”
Major Programs Involving Private Sector and Civil Society
in the Provision of Critical School Resources, 2000-2006
Program
Description
Established through the Adopt-a-School Act of 1998,
serves as an invitation and campaign for private entities to
become active partners in the delivery of basic education
services by giving assistance in
the provision of classrooms, among others -launched in
2000
Started in 2004, brings in cash donation from various
Sagip Eskwela (Save private organizations and individuals for the construction of
new classrooms and repair of school buildings damaged
School)
by typhoon and other calamities
Started in 2002, the nationwide mobilization activity is
Brigada Eskwela community-led program that involves parents and other
members of the Community to give in-kind contributions
(e.g., labor, cleaning instruments, plants, etc.) to repair
classroom and furniture as well as other contributions to
improve the school environment at the beginning of every
school year.
Adopt-a-School
Management
The program is
managed by a
Secretariat attached to
the Office of the
Secretary of DepEd
Contributions
Classrooms
Desks, textbooks,
teacher training,
food and nutrition
supplements
Managed by the AdoptClassroom
aconstruction and
School Secretariat
repair
Legal Basis/ Sustainability
Founded on a law; but the DepEd
should sustain efforts to bring in private
sector and to intensify advocacy to
appeal to them based on the framework
of corporate social responsibility
Pursuant to Adopt-a-School Law.
Sustainability depends
on DepEd leadership
Managed by the Adopt- Classroom and
aschool furniture
School Secretariat
repair, provision of
cleaning
instruments,
building and repair
materials
Presidential Memorandum
Order No. 170 (2005)
institutionalization of National
Maintenance week as a special week for
Brigada Eskwela
FFCCCII builds and
Two-classroom
then turn the school
building over to DepEd school building
construction
Pursuant to Adopt-a-School
Law
Operation Barrio
School - Federation of
Filipino-Chinese
Chamber of Commerce
and Industries, Inc.
(FFCCCII)
Through its Operation Barrio School, the Federation of
Filipino-Chinese Chambers of Commerce and Industry
(FFCCCI) is building 2,500 schools in poor areas
throughout the Philippines.
Classroom Galing sa
Mamamayang Pilipino
Abroad (CGMA) –
Classrooms from
Filipinos Overseas
Through the Department of Labor and Employment the
Implemented in
Classroom Galing Sa Mamayang Pilipino Abroad (CGMA) cooperation
project solicits support from Filipinos to build
with the DOLEOWWA
10,000 classrooms in identified priority elementary and
secondary schools across the Philippines. The initiative
began in 2003.
Classroom
construction
DOLE Department Order 170 (2005)
The K to 12 Reform underpins the over-all
strategies of DepED to improve the basic
education sector. (Usec. Varela)
Address basic inputs and wipe out shortages
Improve the quality of teachers
Strengthen school-based management
Reform the curriculum
Promote good education governance
DepED has made significant progress
in closing the input gaps
 From June 2010 to October 2012...
 around 27,000 classrooms were built;
 more than 29,000 new teacher items
were created and hired;
 millions of textbooks and chairs were
procured and delivered to our
schools.
 By the end of the school year, the
DepEd’s goal is that there will be no
more shortages of chairs and
textbooks.
 By the end of 2013, the DepEd targets to
eliminate all deficits in classrooms, water and
sanitation facilities and teacher items, a first for
our country since World War II.
 The estimated cost of a five-year period to
transition to a 12-year system is around P150
billion, or P30 billion a year.
• To implement K to 12, the DepEd would
need the amount of P46.2 billion, and for
2017, the amount of P51 billion…to build
the classrooms, fund the teacherrequirement, the books, the laboratory
equipment and others.
• the initiative of the DepEd, and the strides
that our Secretary of Education is doing, in
involving and encouraging the
participation of the private sector and the
other sectors of society, and through
private-public partnerships, we will close
the gap for school building deficits by
2013.
K to 12 Impacts

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