Amount of molds on Different Breads - SMS-HB09

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Amount of molds on
Different Breads
David Kim
Hr. 2
Abstract
 This study will lead people to be more aware of the bread
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mold.
“If different breads develop the molds, then white bread wil
l have the most molds.” (This will be discussed again later i
n the presentation)
Independent Variable: Types of bread.
Dependent Variable: Percentage of mold covered.
Control: Each type of bread with no mold.
3 breads with no molds ended up having 17% of mold cover
age on wheat bread, 6% on oat bread, and 1% on white brea
d.
Review of Literature
 Mold is a type of fungus, or organisms that lack in chlorophyll and
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work as decomposers in the nature.
“Bread mold” has its own name called Rhizopus stolonifer.
According to the Bread Mold by John Riverside, (2007) wind carries
spores that grow into a hair-like structure to the bread surface and
when they are matured, they produce fruit-shaped spores called
conidia; waiting for winds to blow spores again.
A person who inhaled mold could suffer from asthma, allergic rhinitis,
and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (Bush RK, Portnoy JM,
Saxon A, Terr AI, Wood RA, 2006; J Allergy Cun Immunol, 2006).
Factors that affect mold growth are humidity, and amounts of nutrients.
Rhizopus stolonifer
Retrieved from: http://www.studentsguide.in/microbi
ology/eukarya-eukaryotic-microorganisms/images/a-p
rimary-sterigmata-b-secondary-sterigmata.jpg
Retrieved from: http://www.biologyju
nction.com/images/tigerbreadmold1.j
pg
Question, Problem, Hypothesis
 Although in modern days most home refrigerators
have fascinating preservation storage, molds can
grow with a person’s tiny mistake. Therefore, this
study is necessary.
 “Does different amounts of mold grow on different
types of bread?”
 “If white, wheat, and oat breads are left in same
temperature, same time, and same place, then
white bread will grow most molds on its surface.”
Experimental Design
Experimental Design (2)
Procedure
 1. Grid plastic zipper bag 10x10 with marker.
 2. Cut the bread to fit the 10x10 grid.
 3. Spray water and place it in the plastic zipper bag (It
might be a good idea to not to zip it so the bread will
be exposure to air and collect some spores).
 4. Repeat step 1-3 with other breads.
 5. Leave them in a dark, humid place for about 7 days
and observe from then on.
Results and Discussion
Day 7
Day 8
Day 9
 Wheat bread had most mold of 17%.
 Oat bread with 6%.
 White bread had least mold of 1%.
White
Bread
0%
1%
1%
Wheat
Bread
3%
5%
17 %
Oat Bread
1%
2%
6%
 Experiment failed at first because
breads from the market contains too
much preservatives.
 All breads except wheat bread were
baked at home (wheat bread was
bought from the market where they
bake themselves).
Data Analysis
18%
 White bread did not
16%
develop molds well.
 Wheat bread increased
in mold coverage more
than 3 times from day 8
to day 9.
 Oat bread had exactly
triple the data on day 9
from day 8.
14%
12%
10%
Day 7
8%
Day 8
6%
Day 9
4%
2%
0%
White Wheat Oat
Bread Bread Bread
Conclusions and Future Studies
 The researcher’s
 The researcher plans to
hypothesis to this problem
was rejected because white
bread did not develop
molds well.
 It seems that more grains
in the bread stimulate
mold growth.
revise the experimental
design so each type of the
bread will expose to air
more.
 The researcher will
consider whether the
bread were bought from
the market or not.
Acknowledgement and
Bibliography
 Greatly thanks to Mrs. Richards for the guidance, and the support of
the equipments.
 J Allergy Cun Immunol (2006). The medical effects of mold exposure.
Retrieved October 12, 2009, from aaaai website:
http://www.aaaai.org/members/academy_statements/position_s
tat ements/mold.pdf
 Riverside, J. (2007). Bread Mold. Retrieved October 24, 2009, from
http://ezinearticles.com/?Bread-Mold&id=405845
 S. S. Block (1953). Humidity Requirements for Mold Growth. Retrieved
October 27, 2009, from aem.asm. website:
http://aem.asm.org/cgi/reprint/1/6/287

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