Homeland Security Opportunities Study

Report
Homeland Security Opportunities Study
3 April 2013
DHS Mission, Goals, Priorities
Core missions
• Counterterrorism
• Border security
• Immigration enforcement
• Cyber security
• Resilience to disasters.
Goals
• DHS effectiveness,
accountability, maturity
• Ties to state, local, tribal,
territorial, and private-sector
partners
• Cooperation with
international partners
Secretary Napolitano
Priorities March 2013:
“DHS 3.0”
• Cyber Security
• Immigration
• Risk-based transportation
and cargo security
DHS Planning, Programming, Budgeting System
National
strategic
framework for
homeland
security
Quadrennial Homeland
Security Review
(QHSR)
FEB 2010
Initiatives to
implement the
QHSR.
Bottom Up Review
(BUR)
JUL 2010
Strategic
Assessment
Report
O
Resource
Allocation
Decision
Integrated
Planning
Guidance
Threat and
Vulnerability
Assessment
S
Core missions:
• Counterterrorism
• Border security
• Immigration
enforcement
Goals: Improving:
• Cyber security • DHS effectiveness, accountability,
• Resilience to
maturity
disasters.
• Ties to state, local, tribal, territorial, and
private-sector partners
• Cooperation with international partners
N
D
J
Program
Budget
Decision
Resource
Allocation
Decision
F
M
A
M
Program Executing Divisions
DHS Budget
and FYSHP
to OMB
J
J
A
S
DHS Opportunity Insight Sources
Process owner:
DHS Office of
Policy
Quadrennial Homeland
Security Review
(QHSR)
Budget Review
Board
FEB 2010
Joint
Requirements
Council
Bottom Up Review
(BUR)
Historic
Procurements
JUL 2010
Strategic
Assessment
Report
Integrated
Planning
Guidance
Threat and
Vulnerability
Assessment
S
O
Resource
Allocation
Decision
N
D
J
Program
Budget
Decision
Resource
Allocation
Decision
F
M
A
M
Program Executing Divisions
DHS Budget
and FYSHP
to OMB
X
J
J
A
S
Quadrennial Homeland Security Review
• Security: Protect the United States and its people, vital interests, and way of life;
• Resilience: Foster individual, community, and system robustness, adaptability, and capacity for
rapid recovery
• Customs and Exchange: Expedite and enforce lawful trade, travel, and immigration.
Mission
Goals
1.Preventing
Terrorism,
Enhancing
Security
1.1 Prevent Terrorist Attacks
1.2 Prevent the Unauthorized Acquisition or Use of Chemical, Biological,
Radiological, and Nuclear Materials and Capabilities
1.3 Manage Risks to Critical Infrastructure, Key Leadership, and Events
2.Securing and
Managing
Borders
2.1 Effectively Control U.S. Air, Land, and Sea Borders
2.2 Safeguard Lawful Trade and Travel
2.3 Disrupt and Dismantle Transnational Criminal Organizations
3.Enforcing and
Administering
Immigration
Laws
3.1 Strengthen and Effectively Administer the Immigration System
3.2 Prevent Unlawful Immigration
4. Safeguarding
and Securing
Cyberspace
4.1 Create a Safe, Secure, and Resilient Cyber Environment
4.2 Promote Cybersecurity Knowledge and Innovation
5. Ensuring
Resilience to
Disasters
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
Mitigate Hazards
Enhance Preparedness
Ensure Effective Emergency Response
Rapidly Recover
Bottom Up Review
QHSR Implementation (1)
Mission
1.Preventing
Terrorism,
Enhancing
Security
Initiatives
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2.Securing and
Managing
Borders
Strengthen counterterrorism coordination across DHS
Strengthen aviation security
Create an integrated Departmental information sharing architecture
Deliver infrastructure protection and resilience capabilities to the field
Set national performance standards for identification verification
Increase efforts to detect and counter nuclear and biological weapons
and dangerous materials
Leverage the full range of capabilities to address biological and nuclear threats
Standardize and institutionalize the National Fusion Center Network
Promote safeguards for access to secure areas in critical facilities
Establish DHS as a center of excellence for canine training and deployment
Redesign the Federal Protective Service (FPS) to better match mission
requirements
• Expand joint operations and intelligence capabilities, including enhanced
domain awareness
• Prioritize immigration and customs investigations on the security of global trade
and travel systems
• Enhance the security and resilience of global trade and travel systems
• Strengthen and expand DHS-related security assistance internationally
• Enhance North American security
Bottom Up Review
QHSR Implementation (2)
Mission
Initiatives
3.Enforcing and
Administering
Immigration
Laws
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Comprehensive immigration reform
Improve DHS immigration services processes
Focus on fraud detection and national security vetting
Target egregious employers who knowingly exploit illegal workers
Dismantle human smuggling organizations
Improve the detention and removal process
Work with new Americans so that they fully transition to the rights and
responsibilities of citizenship
• Maintain a model detention system commensurate with risk
4. Safeguarding
and Securing
Cyberspace
• Increase the focus and integration of DHS’s operational cybersecurity
and infrastructure resilience activities
• Strengthen DHS ability to protect cyber networks
• Increase DHS predictive, investigative, and forensic capabilities for cyber
intrusions and attacks
• Promote cybersecurity public awareness
5. Ensuring
Resilience to
Disasters
• Enhance catastrophic disaster preparedness
• Improve DHS’ ability to lead in emergency management
• Explore opportunities with the private sector to “design-in” greater resilience for
critical infrastructure
• Make individual and family preparedness and critical facility resilience inherent in
community preparedness
Bottom Up Review
Additional Initiatives
Mission
Initiatives
Improving
Department
Management
•
•
•
•
•
•
Seek restoration of the Secretary’s reorganization authority for DHS headquarters
Realign component regional configurations into a single DHS regional structure.
Improve cross-Departmental management, policy, and functional integration
Strengthen internal DHS counterintelligence capabilities
Enhance the Department's risk management capability
Strengthen coordination within DHS through cross-Departmental training and
career paths
• Enhance the DHS workforce
• Balance the DHS workforce by ensuring strong federal control of all DHS work and
reducing reliance on contractors
Increasing
Accountability
• Increase Analytic Capability and Capacity
• Improve Performance Measurement and Accountability
• Strengthen Acquisition Oversight
BUR 2010 Opportunities
Preventing Terrorism and Enhancing Security (1)
Initiative
Opportunity Area
Strengthen
aviation security
• Partner with DOE including National Laboratories and private industry to develop
new and more effective technologies to deter and disrupt known threats and
proactively anticipate and protect against new ways by which terrorists could seek
to board an aircraft.
• Collaborate with the aviation industry to use a risk-based approach to inform
decisions about changes to operations, business processes, and aircraft
development.
Create an
integrated
Departmental
sharing
architecture to
consolidate and
streamline access
to intelligence,
law enforcement,
screening, and
other information
across the
Department
• Consolidate and streamline access to intelligence, law enforcement, screening, and
other information across the Department
• Automated recurrent screening and vetting for individuals to whom DHS has
provided a license, privilege, or status (including immigration status) so that, as
new information becomes available, DHS can assess whether the individual is no
longer eligible for the benefit or presents a threat. It will also include the
capability to conduct scenario-based automated targeting of individuals and other
entities using intelligence driven criteria.
BUR 2010 Opportunities
Preventing Terrorism and Enhancing Security (2)
Initiative
Opportunity Area
Increase efforts
to detect and
counter nuclear
and biological
weapons and
dangerous
materials
• Nuclear detection research and development and also work with the Intelligence
Community to develop intelligence and analysis capabilities relating to improvised
nuclear devices and radiological dispersal devices including capability to detect
and react to pre-detonation cues or signatures to provide early warning indicators
of an imminent or credible threat of a terrorist attack using a nuclear
• Weapon
• Greater emphasis on biological detection and countermeasures
• Accelerate development of forensics capabilities for biological weapons in order to
help attribute those attacks to a particular country or group… including increasing
the capabilities of the DHS National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures
Center (NBACC)
• Increase international capabilities to track the evolution and migration of
potentially high consequence human, animal, and plant diseases.
Promote
safeguards for
access to secure
areas in critical
facilities.
• Expand risk-informed screening and recurrent vetting in the transportation sector.
• Recurrently vet all Federal employees, contractors, and Federal secure
identification credential holders.
BUR 2010 Opportunities
Securing and Managing Our Borders (1)
Initiative
Expand joint
operations and
intelligence
capabilities,
including
enhanced
domain
awareness
Opportunity Area
• Unify the uses of technology, surveillance capabilities, and related resources across
air, land, and maritime domains, with an increased emphasis on data collection,
data processing, and integrating sensors across domains.
• Harmonize operations and intelligence—utilizing concepts and structures modeled
after JIATFSouth, as appropriate—for the geographical approaches not covered by
JIATF-South, such as the southwest border, as well as for arrivals of people and
goods into the United States
• build upon the successful models established as part of our interagency
counternarcotics infrastructure—including the Air and Marine Operations Center, the
El Paso Intelligence Center, and other DHS and U.S. government operations
centers—to apply those models more broadly to the spectrum of homeland security
challenges across the air, land, and maritime domains.
• Establish and coordinate cross-domain operational threat analysis and response
protocols in order to ensure greater effectiveness of interagency and
intergovernmental response to threats across air, land, and maritime domains..
BUR 2010 Opportunities
Securing and Managing Our Borders (2)
Initiative
Opportunity Area
Enhance the
security and
resilience of
global trade and
travel systems
• Continue the development and implementation of trusted traveler and trusted
shipper programs in order to increase our knowledge of people and goods that pose
low risk traveling or transiting in global trade and travel systems.
• Enhance the sophistication of its information sharing architecture in order to
evaluate the risk posed by people and goods in transit while safeguarding privacy,
civil rights, and civil liberties
Enhance North
American
security
• Enhance information sharing with Federal, State, local, tribal, nongovernmental,
private sector, and international partners along the Northern and Southern borders.
• Foster cross-border threat and risk assessments and enhanced coordination and
cooperation on securing the transnational flow of people and goods through
expanding joint efforts and shared resources
BUR 2010 Opportunities
Securing and Managing Our Borders (3)
Initiative
Strengthen and
expand DHSrelated security
assistance
internationally
(e.g. border
integrity and
customs
enforcement
security
assistance)
consistent with
U.S. government
security, trade
promotion,
international
travel, and foreign
assistance
objectives
Opportunity Area
Comprehensive expansion of the Foreign Military Sales system application to homeland
security- related international cooperation
“Our national security depends on the ability of foreign governments to effectively combat
terrorism and other threats within their own borders. DHS has substantial capability and
capacity to help implement assistance and training to foreign governments in areas such as
biometrics, document fraud, aviation security, port and maritime security, cargo security,
bulk cash smuggling, customs enforcement, and human smuggling and trafficking. The U.S.
government, through the Departments of State and Defense, provides security assistance
and foreign assistance to legitimate members and representatives of foreign security forces
and civilian institutions. This includes providing resources to institutions related to homeland
security in foreign countries— including land and maritime border integrity and customs
enforcement functions.”
“DHS believes that training and technical assistance for international security partners in the
areas of border integrity and customs enforcement must be increased. DHS also supports
the strengthening of security to facilitate travel and commerce for legitimate travelers and
goods. DHS will work in consultation and coordination with the Departments and State and
Defense, as well as with Congress, to ensure adequate resources to support these purposes.
DHS will also coordinate a proposal with the Department of Defense (DOD) to post DHS
liaison officers in each of the DOD geographic commands to coordinate and integrate
homeland security-related assistance funding aims. Finally, DHS will explore the expansion
of additional international partnerships for homeland security-related activities as
appropriate, in consultation and coordination with the Department of State and, where
appropriate, DOD, including current activities such as visa security and international law
enforcement training.”
BUR 2010 Opportunities
Enforcing and Administering Our Immigration Laws
Initiative
Opportunity Area
Focus on fraud
detection and
national
security vetting
• Improve DHS ability to analyze information, especially in identifying high risk
cases, to better address fraud and national security concerns.
• Increase intelligence relating to analysis of entry, exit, and stay information.
BUR 2010 Opportunities
Safeguarding and Securing Cyberspace
Initiative
Opportunity Area
Increase the
focus and
integration of
DHS’s
operational
cybersecurity
and
infrastructure
resilience
activities.
• Use new models for developing, acquiring, and disseminating cybersecurity
technology, including technology leasing arrangements, technical service
agreements, and development of secondary markets for cyber security technology
among State, local, tribal, and territorial governments.
Increase DHS
predictive,
investigative,
and forensic
capabilities for
cyber intrusions
and attacks
• Build a new predictive analytic capability that will work closely with the law
enforcement and intelligence communities and the private sector to improve the
identification of cyber adversaries, establish and advance deterrence strategies, and
promote a more accurate understanding of emerging cyber threats.
• Establish reliable mechanisms to categorize, store, and retrieve relevant cyber
information from DHS databases, consistent with protection of privacy, civil rights,
and civil liberties.
• Develop and implement a robust process to share finished cyber intelligence
products and other information in a timely fashion within DHS and with our Federal,
State, local, tribal, territorial, and private sector partners
FYHSP Future Years Homeland Security Program
De Jure
De Facto
• Content: budget year +4 plan articulates
total DHS resources programmed by fiscal
year
“…Finally, the Department has failed to
comply with nearly all of the statutory
reporting requirements contained in
Public Law 112–74.”
• Updated 3 times per FY:
- March, to reflect OE RAP submissions
- August to reflect departmental
decisions for the OMB budget and
FYHSP submission
- January to reflect the President’s
Budget/FYHSP submission
• Internal DHS document released only with
DHS CFO permission; Congressional
oversight committees receive a special
publication with the President’s Budget
submit
DHS Management Directive 1330 02/14/2005
“OE” – Organization Element
“RAP” – Resource Allocation Plan
“By flouting Congressional
requirements, the Department is
effectively disregarding the taxpayers’
right to see whether or not their scarce
dollars are spent wisely.”
Appropriations Committee report on the DHS
FY13 appropriation.
DHS Procurements FY12-17
All Programs ($M) as of 2012
DHS Opportunity Areas
Increase efforts to detect
and counter nuclear and
biological weapons and
dangerous materials
•
•
CBP
FEMA
FLETC
ICE
TSA
USCG
USSS
`
Customs and Border Protection
Federal Emergency Management Agency
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center
Immigration and Customs Enforcement
Transportation Security Agency
US Coast Guard
US Secret Service
Expand joint operations
and intelligence
capabilities, including
enhanced domain
awareness
•
Enhance the security and
resilience of global trade
and travel systems
•
Enhance North American
security
DHS Acquisition Planning Forecast System
http://apfs.dhs.gov/
CBP
Foundations
Formation: Legacy
Agencies
•
U.S. Border Patrol
•
U.S. Customs Service
•
U.S. Department of
Agriculture, Animal and
Plant Health Inspection
Service
•
U.S. Immigration and
Naturalization
History
1789 Congress establishes Customs
1835 Customs revenues reduce the national debt to zero.
1862 U.S. Department of Agriculture created
1891 Office of the Superintendent of Immigration
established
1904 U.S. Immigration Service is assigned a small force
of mounted inspectors
1912 Federal Horticultural Board created, leading to
USDA Plant Protection and Quarantine Program
1924 Congress establishes the U.S. Border Patrol
1925 Immigration and Naturalization Service formed
1993 Congress passes Customs Modernization Act;
Operation Hold the Line established
2003 CBP created
2004 Air and marine personnel, missions, commitments,
facilities, and assets transferred to CBP.
2006 CBP creates Office of Air and Marine
CBP
Mission
“We are the guardians of our Nation’s
borders. We are America’s frontline.
We safeguard the American
homeland at and beyond our borders.
We protect the American public
against terrorists and the instruments
of terror. We steadfastly enforce the
laws of the United States while
fostering our Nation’s economic
security through lawful international
trade and travel. We serve the
American public with vigilance,
integrity and professionalism.”
5,000 miles of border with Canada
1,900 miles of border with Mexico
95,000 miles of tidal shoreline
329 ports of entry within 20 field
offices
• 139 Border Patrol stations within
20 Sectors, with 31permanent
checkpoint
•
•
•
•
Day in the Life…
• Processed
• 932,456 passengers and pedestrians
• 259,191 air passengers/crew
• 48,073 ship passengers/crew
• 621,874 land travelers
• 64,483 containers
• 253,821 privately-owned vehicles
• Executed:
• 591 inadmissibles at the ports of entry
• 932 apprehensions between the ports of entry
• 470 refusals of entry at U.S. ports of entry
• 61 arrests at U.S. ports of entry
• Intercepted: 49 fraudulent documents
• Seized:
• 13,717 pounds of drugs
• $345,687 in undeclared or illicit currency
• 470 pests
CBP Opportunities
Opportunities
Outlook and Emerging Needs
• Spillover of Mexican drug cartel violence
into the U.S.
• Increasing influence of Mexican Drug
Trafficking Organizations (DTOs) over U.S.based gangs
• Increased Border Patrol mobility
•
Back packable, ruggedized,
high TRL tactical UAVS,
launched in one minute.
•
Border tripwires, acoustic
sensors to detect ultralights,
and air-based wide area
surveillance sensors.
•
Development of improved
maritime situational
awareness and information
sharing capabilities for the
USCG and CBP.
•
U.S./Canada sensor
information sharing
• Improved risk analysis
• Improved situational awareness
• Significant improvement in wide-area
surveillance
TSA
Foundations
Formation
History
Created Nov 2001 in the Aviation and
Transportation Security Act. Three
mandates:
2001 Congress creates TSA
•
Security for all modes of transportation;
•
Deploy Security Officers for 450
commercial airports from Guam to
Alaska in 12 months; and,
•
Screen all checked luggage for
explosives by December 31, 2002.
2003 Moved from DOT to DHS
TSA
Mission
“…protects the Nation’s transportation
systems to ensure freedom of movement
for people and commerce.”
“TSA employs a risk-based strategy to
secure U.S. transportation systems,
working closely with stakeholders in
aviation, rail, transit, highway, and
pipeline sectors, as well as the partners in
the law enforcement and intelligence
community. The agency continuously sets
the standard for excellence in
transportation security through its people,
processes, technologies and use of
intelligence to drive operations.
2011 Highlights
• Screened more than 1.7
million passengers a day
• Detected 1,100 firearms in
carry-on bags in 2011.
• Completed deployment of
500 advanced imaging
technology machines
• Screened 100% air cargo
TSA
Programs and Challenges
Grant Programs
Security grants to mass transit and passenger rail
systems, intercity bus companies, freight railroad
carriers, ferries and the trucking industry to help protect
the public and nation’s critical transportation
infrastructure against acts of terrorism and other largescale events.
Law Enforcement Programs
• Armed Security Officers
• Canine & Explosives Detection
• Crew Member Self-Defense
• Federal Air Marshals
• Federal Flight Deck Officers
• Law Enforcement Officers Flying Armed
Security Programs
• Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response (VIPR)
• Travel Document Checker
• Behavior Detection Officers (BDO)
• Secure Flight
• Federal Air Marshals (FAMs)
• Federal Flight Deck Officer (FFDO)
• Employee Screening
• Checkpoint Screening Technology
Security Screening
Challenges
• Demand growth in commercial
carrier will increase from 712M
emplanements in 2011 to 1B+ by
2021.
• Credibility problem: Joint
Transportation and Infrastructure
and the Government Reform and
Oversight Committees found
- 5,700 pieces of security
equipment in storage with a
purchase value of $184 million,
plus $3.5 million storage
expense.
- Backscatter technology
acquired after 2009 Christmas
bomb plot was poorly tested
and remains banned in the EU.
TSA
Outlook and Opportunities
• Service contracts will dominate the U.S.
screening technologies market FY2012-2015 as
upgrades, training and maintenance
requirements become more necessary to extend
the systems’ endurance… FY2011 437.1M budget
for U.S. airport screening technology
investments will progressively decline.
• Investment accounts should increase in 2016 to
fund modernization. Future requirements will
call for systems that are smaller, versatile —
equipment that can stand-alone or in-line
configurations — and can speed up throughput.
FY2011-2015
• Screening system service
contracts: training,
maintenance, upgrades
FY2016 ->
Screening system upgrades and
replacement
Overall
• Improved systems
engineering, testing,
validation.
• “TSA bureaucracy is large and improvident
adding more difficulty to an already troubled
• Privatization of screening.
budget process. A lack of faith in TSA procedures
and government reports of mismanagement is
Insecurity: TSA’s Failure to Cost-Effectively Procure,
prompting a move towards the privatization of • “Airport
Deploy and Warehouse its Screening Technologies, “ Joint
screening.”
Majority Staff Report, Joint Transportation and Infrastructure
and the Government Reform and Oversight Committees, May 9,
2012
•
“Airport Screening Technology Market to Shrink, Analyst Says,”
John Hernandez, Analyst, Frost & Sullivan, August 2012
US Coast Guard
Foundations
Formation
History
• Title 14 USC: "The Coast Guard as
established January 28, 1915, shall
be a military service and a branch
of the armed forces of the United
States at all times.”
1790 Revenue-Marine (later renamed Revenue
Cutter Service) created within the
Treasury Department
• Operates under the authority of the
Department of the Navy upon the
declaration of war or when the
President directs.
• Guardians on active duty and in the
Reserve are subject to the Uniform
Code of Military Justice and receive
the same pay and allowances as
members of the same pay grades
in the other four armed services.
1915 Revenue Cutter Service combines with
the U.S. Lifesaving Service (est. 1848)
to create the Coast Guard
1939 U.S. Lighthouse Service (est. 1789)
added
1946 Steamboat Inspection Service (est.
1838) added
1967 Coast Guard transferred to Department
of Transportation
2003 Coast Guard transferred to Department
of Homeland Security
US Coast Guard
Mission
• Ports, waterways, and coastal
security
• Drug interdiction
• Aids to navigation
• Search and rescue
• Living marine resources
• Marine safety
• Defense readiness
• Migrant interdiction
• Marine environmental protection
• Ice operations
• Other law enforcement
Day in the Life…
• 12 lives saved in 64 search and rescue cases
• 842 pounds of cocaine seized
• 116 buoys serviced
• 720 commercial vessels screened
• 183,000 crew and passengers screened
• 173 credentials to issued merchant mariners
• 13 marine accidents investigated
• 68 containers inspected
• 29 vessels inspected for air emissions
compliance
• 28 foreign vessels examined for safety and
environmental compliance
• Boards 13 fishing boats
• 10 pollution incidents investigated
US Coast Guard
Emerging UAS Requirement for Maritime Domain Awareness
Persistent, wide area surveillance,
detection, classification, and target
identification functions and on-scene
tactical communications.
“The service aims to augment its
aviation fleet with land-based UAS to
provide strategic, wide-area
surveillance and cutter-based UAS to
provide tactical, on-demand capability
for National Security Cutters (NSC) and
Offshore Patrol Cutters. A third small
UAS—dubbed sUAS, which could
provide an interim capability for NSCs
until a robust cutter-based solution can
be proven and acquired—is also under
consideration.”
“Both land- and cutter-based UAS are
still in the preacquisition phase, with
mission needs statements and
concepts of operations in
development.”
Coast Guard Leaders Get First Look at
ScanEagle Small Unmanned Aircraft System
On May 3, U.S. Coast Guard, Navy and
congressional stakeholders gathered in
Dahlgren, Va., to watch a fixed-wing aircraft
take off without a pilot. The launch kicked
off a technology demonstration phase for
the ScanEagle small Unmanned Aircraft
System (sUAS), which is scheduled to
undergo more extensive demonstration this
summer on one of the Coast Guard’s
National Security Cutters (NSC)… “Although
we are looking at the small UAS as an
interim solution to a larger airframe with
more sensor capability, the ScanEagle
UAS testing from an NSC this summer will
help us build the concept of operations
and the tactics, techniques and
procedures for future UAS operations…”
US Coast Guard
UAS Opportunities
USCG 211 aircraft in inventory:
• C-37A Gulfstream V
Platform opportunities
• HC-144A The Ocean Sentry
• Land-based UAS
• HC-130J Super Hercules
• Cutter-based UAS
• HC-130H Hercules
• Small UAS (“interim”)
• HU-25 Guardian
Capability opportunities
• HH/MH-65C Dolphin
• Larger airframes
• MH-60J/T Jayhawk
• Improved sensors
• High and Medium Altitude
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
(HAEUAV)*
Analysis opportunities
• Vertical take-off-and-landing
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (VUAV)*
• Develop CONOPS
• Develop TTP
• Airspace integration
* Resources still in development
“I firmly believe that unmanned aerial systems have a future in the Coast Guard and
we’re being very deliberate about this…We’re doing an awful lot of up-front research
and development, and we’re partnering with agencies that have had extensive lessons
learned in how to operate unmanned systems.” Capt. Austin Gould, Chief Coast Guard
Research, Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) Program
USCG
2012 Aviation Projects
Project
HC-130H/J Long Range
Surveillance Aircraft
Description
$Value
6 J A/C. New engines, propellers, avionics, sensors and cargo handling
equipment. Modernizing airframes, avionics and mission systems of 16
HC-130H LRS aircraft. Deliveries of converted aircraft beginning FY 2012.
HC-144A OCEAN SENTRY
MARITIME PATROL AIRCRAFT
(MPA)
Equipped with communication, navigation and surveillance systems,
including surface search radar and an electro-optical/infrared sensor.
Search and rescue, maritime patrol, medical evacuation and transport
missions.
Conversion to MH-60T. Upgrading the airframes, avionics and mission
systems of its 42 MH-60J Jayhawk MRR helicopters.
MH-60J/T JAYHAWK MEDIUM
RANGE RECOVERY (MRR)
HELICOPTER CONVERSION
PROJECTS
MH-65C/D HELICOPTER
Modernize 101 Dolphins and extend service life through 2027.
CONVERSION AND
SUSTAINMENT PROJECTS
UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS Researching land- and cutter-based UASs that to extend the ISR
(UAS)
capabilities of its manned surface and aircraft assets. Following this
research, the Coast Guard will develop an acquisition strategy
mission requirements.
USCG
2012 Surface Projects
Project
NATIONAL SECURITY CUTTER
(NSC)
OFFSHORE PATROL CUTTER
(OPC)
FAST RESPONSE CUTTER (FRC)
IN-SERVICE CUTTERS –
MISSION EFFECTIVENESS
PROJECT (MEP)
Ice Breaker
Description
Eight NSCs began delivery in FY 2008
25 OPCs to replace current 210-foot and 270-foot Medium Endurance
Cutters.
58 Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutters (FRCs).
Sustainment program for the 210-foot and 270-foot Medium Endurance
Cutters (WMECs) and the 110-foot Island-class patrol boats (WPBs).
Refurbishing the Polar Star. Completion 2014.
RESPONSE BOAT – MEDIUM (RB- Replacing aging 41-foot utility boats and other non-standard boats with
M)
180 RB-Ms.
RESPONSE BOAT – SMALL (RBS)
Up to 500 standard Defender-class response boats (470 for the Coast
Guard, 20 for DHS and 10 for the U.S. Navy).
National Security Cutter
Begun under the Deepwater Program as an eight-ship class intended to
replace the aging 378-foot High Endurance Cutters (WHECs). The first
three NSCs–Bertholf, Waesche and Stratton–were acquired under contract
with the Integrated Coast Guard Systems industry consortium.
The next two cutters–NSCs 4 and 5–are being built at Pascagoula, Miss.,
under fixed-price, incentive-type production contracts.
$Value
USCG
2012 C4ISR Projects
Project
COAST GUARD LOGISTICS
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
SYSTEM (CG-LIMS)
Command, Control,
Communications, Computers,
Intelligence, Surveillance and
Reconnaissance Project
Interagency Operations Centers
Description
A centrally managed, integrated, enterprise-wide logistics IT system
supporting all assets.
A segmented approach to delivering products. Each subsequent segment
builds upon the previous to avoid technology obsolescence and bring new
capability to the fleet at a faster rate
WatchKeeper coordinates and organizes port security information. A
technology demonstration version has been released to approximately half
of the port locations.
NATIONWIDE AUTOMATIC
A data system designed to enhance navigation safety, the maritime
IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM (NAIS) transportation system and Maritime Domain Awareness by providing the
shore-side communications, network and processing capability to
exchange Automatic Identification System (AIS) data in major U.S. ports
and from U.S.-bound vessels.
• Increment 1: The shore-based capability to receive AIS messages within
the Nation’s 58 major ports and 16 most critical coastal areas is
implemented by using existing government infrastructure and meeting
cost and performance requirements.
• Increment 2: Transceiver capability, transmitting data out to 24 nautical
miles and receiving data from out to 50 nautical miles is implemented.
$Value
USCG
2012 C4ISR Projects
Project
RESCUE 21
Description
$Value
Command, control and communications system for all missions in the
coastal zone. Began in 2007 and continuing through 2017.
• Regional surveys.
• Establishment of remote antenna sites.
• Physical installation and testing of the communications equipment at
Coast Guard facilities and communication centers throughout the region.
• Ongoing follow-on maintenance and support of the Rescue 21 system.
FEMA
Foundations
Formation
•
•
•
History
Robert T. Stafford Disaster
Relief and Emergency
Assistance Act, PL 100-707,
signed into law November
23, 1988; amended the
Disaster Relief Act of 1974,
PL 93-288.
1803 Congress provides first assistance to a New
Hampshire town following an extensive fire
The Homeland Security Act
of 2002, November 25,
2002 PL 107-296.
1962 Hurricane Carla
Post Katrina Emergency
Management Reform Act
(PKEMRA) PL 109–295
1930s Reconstruction Finance Corporation
1934 Bureau of Public Roads authorized to provide
funding for highways and bridges damaged by
natural disasters. Flood Control Act passed.
1964 Alaskan Earthquake
1965 Hurricane Betsy
1968 National Flood Insurance Act
1969 Hurricane Camille
1971 San Fernando Earthquake
1972 Hurricane Agnes
1974 Disaster Relief Act
1979 President Carter creates FEMA
2003 FEMA joins DHS
FEMA
Mission
“…To support our citizens and
first responders to ensure that as
a nation we work together to
build, sustain, and improve our
capability to prepare for, protect
against, respond to, recover
from, and mitigate all hazards.”
2011 Highlights
Coordinates the federal
government's role in preparing
for, preventing, mitigating the
effects of, responding to, and
recovering from all domestic
disasters, whether natural or
man-made, including acts of
terror.
• Hurricane
• 98 major disaster declarations
• 26 emergency declarations
• 112 fire management assistance grant
(FMAG) declarations
• Joplin, Missouri tornado
• North Dakota flood
• National Disaster Recovery Framework
released
• $2.9B grants released
• National Flood Insurance Program review
• “Great Central U.S. Shakeout” drill
• First national Emergency Alert System test
FEMA
Plans and Priorities
2011 – 2014 Strategic Plan
Budget Priorities
1. Foster a Whole Community Approach to
Emergency Management Nationally …[to]
build preparedness and resilience.
•
Disaster Relief Fund
•
2. Build the Nation's Capacity to Stabilize
and Recover From a Catastrophic Event
…within 72 hours, restore basic services
and community functionality within 60
days, and recover from the long-term
effects of the event within five years.
Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk
Analysis
•
National Flood Insurance Fund
•
State and Local Programs
•
Emergency Food and Shelter
•
National Pre-disaster Mitigation
Fund
•
Radiological Emergency
Preparedness Program
•
U.S. Fire Administration
3. Build Unity of Effort and Common
Strategic Understanding Among the
Emergency Management Team… identify
the top threats and hazards—and
opportunities—across the country to
effectively plan, assess gaps, mitigate,
and build capabilities to address riskbased requirements.
4. Enhance FEMA's Ability to Learn and
Innovate as an Organization.
Opportunities
FEMA
Opportunity Areas
Budget
Category /
Program
Opportunity
Activity
Mission
Disaster Relief
Fund
Logistics
Management
Directorate
• Plan, manage and sustain national logistics response and
recovery operations, in support of domestic emergencies and
special events
• Serve as the National Logistics Coordinator.
Flood Hazard
Mapping and
Risk Analysis
• Coastal Flood
Studies
• Significant
Riverine
Flood Hazard
Update
Needs
• Address flood hazard data update needs and preserve
successful Flood Map Modernization investments.
• Integrated flood risk management approach supporting the
National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) I
• Watershed-based risk assessments that serve as the
foundation for local Hazard Mitigation Plans and support
community actions to reduce risk.
• Collaborate with communities to help them understand and
take actions to manage their risks and build more resilient
communities.
Grant
programs
Prepare State and local governments to prevent, protect
against, respond to, and recover from incidents of terrorism
and other catastrophic events.
National Flood
Insurance
Fund
State and
Local
Programs
FEMA
Logistics Management Directorate
Initiative
Role
Disaster Logistics
Distribution
Management
Operations
Manages the Agency’s warehouse facilities and transportation systems used to
receive, store, maintain, issue, distribute and track supplies, services,
materiel, and equipment.
Logistics Supply
Chain
Management
System (LSCMS)
Manages the Nation’s end-to-end supply chain of critical disaster assets and
commodities. LSCMS manages the supply chain process including: initial
request for assets and commodities, orders to FEMA and partners,
transportation, inventory management at FEMA locations, shipment, and
receipt by the States. LSCMS provides situational awareness and in-transit
visibility through reporting and GIS mapping capabilities.
Disaster Logistics
Operations
Manages the Temporary Housing Unit (THU) Storage Sites Program supporting
the Disaster Assistance Directorate’s Direct Housing Program. The program is
part of a lifecycle and performance-based business model, and supports THU
sites with contracts for various support services.
Emergency
Evacuation
Provides management oversight for ensuring in-transit visibility of all assets
deployed in support of evacuation requirements.
FEMA
Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis and National Flood
Insurance Fund
Initiative
Description
Coastal Flood
Studies
FEMA will continue the effort started in 2009 to update the Nation’s
coastal flood hazard studies. This investment will address the remaining
coastal flood hazard data update needs, representing approximately 3,100
miles of open coast.
Significant Riverine
Flood Hazard Update
Needs
Update riverine hazard engineering analyses. This also includes other
non-coastal flood hazards like ponding and shallow flooding and updates
related to the accreditation status of levees. This investment will maintain
or slightly increase the existing level of flood hazard data update needs by
initiating updates for 9,000 miles of inland flooding sources. Through Risk
MAP, FEMA will update the flood hazard data by watershed where
necessary so that FEMA’s flood hazard data is in agreement with other
Federal agencies’ scientific data within the watershed.
FEMA
State and Local Programs
•
National
Preparedness Grant
Program (NPGP)
•
First Responder
Assistance
Programs (FRAP)
•
Management and
Administration (SLP
M&A)
•
Emergency
Management
Performance Grants
(EMPG)
•
Firefighter
Assistance Grants
(AFG)
FEMA
National Preparedness Grant Program: Prevention
Capability
Description
Forensics and
Attribution
Conduct forensic analysis and attribute terrorist acts (including the means and
methods of terrorism) to their source, to include forensic analysis as well as
attribution for an attack and for the preparation for an attack in an effort to
prevent initial or follow-on acts and/or swiftly develop counter-options.
Intelligence and
Information
Sharing
Provide timely, accurate, and actionable information resulting from the
planning, direction, collection, exploitation, processing, analysis, production,
dissemination, evaluation, and feedback of available information concerning
threats to the United States, its people, property, or interests; the
development, proliferation, or use of WMDs; or any other matter bearing on
U.S. national or homeland security by Federal, state, local, and other
stakeholders. Information sharing is the ability to exchange intelligence,
information, data, or knowledge
Screening,
Search, and
Detection
Identify, discover, or locate threats and/or hazards through active and passive
surveillance and search procedures. This may include the use of systematic
examinations and assessments, sensor technologies, or physical investigation
and intelligence.
FEMA
National Preparedness Grant Program: Protection (1)
Capability
Description
Access
Control and
Identity
Verification
Physical, technological, and cyber measures to control admittance to critical
locations and systems, limiting access to authorized individuals to carry out
legitimate activities.
Cyber
security
Protect against damage to, the unauthorized use of, and/or the exploitation of
(and, if needed, the restoration of) electronic communications systems and
services (and the information contained therein).
Intelligence
and
Information
Sharing
Provide timely, accurate, and actionable information resulting from the planning,
direction, collection, exploitation, processing, analysis, production, dissemination,
evaluation, and feedback of available information concerning threats to the United
States, its people, property, or interests; the development, proliferation, or use of
WMDs; or any other matter bearing on U.S. national or homeland security by
Federal, state, local, and other stakeholders. Information sharing is the ability to
exchange intelligence, information, data, or knowledge among Federal, state,
local or private sector entities as appropriate.
FEMA
National Preparedness Grant Program: Protection (2)
Capability
Description
Risk
Management
for Protection
Programs and
Activities.
Identify, assess, and prioritize risks to inform Protection activities and
investments
Screening,
Search, and
Detection
Identify, discover, or locate threats and/or hazards through active and passive
surveillance and search procedures. This may include the use of systematic
examinations and assessments, sensor technologies, or physical investigation and
intelligence.
Supply Chain
Integrity and
Security
Strengthen the security and resilience of the supply chain.
FEMA
National Preparedness Grant Program: Mitigation and Response
Mitigation
Capability
Description
Risk and
Disaster
Resilience
Assessment
Assess risk and disaster resilience so that decision makers, responders, and
community members can
Threats and
Hazard
Identification
Identify the threats and hazards that occur in the geographic area; determine the
frequency and magnitude; and incorporate this into analysis and planning
processes so as to clearly understand the needs of a community or entity.
Response
Capability
Mass Search
and Rescue
Operations
Description
Deliver traditional and atypical search and rescue capabilities, including
personnel, services, animals, and assets to survivors in need, with the goal of
saving the greatest number of endangered lives in the shortest time possible.
FEMA
National Exercise Division
Task
Status
Exercise coordination
support
In source selection Small Business Set-Aside Cost plus fixed fee,
Award expected: August
Exercise design and control
In source selection. Full and open competition Cost plus fixed fee,
Award expected: August
Program management
support
In source selection, 8(a) set aside, IDIQ, Award expected:
December
Subject matter expertise
resources
RFP not yet released Unconfirmed competition type IDIQ, Award
expected: October
Exercise evaluation support
Awarded to CNA in July, IDIQ
S&T
Mission
“…to strengthen America’s security
and resiliency by providing
knowledge products and innovative
technology solutions for the
Homeland Security Enterprise.”
2011 Highlights
• Multi-Band Radio testing
• Updated and broadened
deployment of the National
Incident Command System
• National Information Sharing
Agreement
• Demonstrated First Responder
Support Tool
• Advanced Next Generation SelfContained Breathing Apparatus
S&T
Goals and Programs
Goals
Objectives
1. Rapidly develop and
deliver knowledge,
analyses, and
innovative solutions
that advance the
mission of the
Department
• Provide knowledge, technologies, and science-based solutions that
are integrated into homeland security operations, employing DHS’s
new, integrated investment lifecycle process
• Strengthen relationships with DHS components and the first
responder community to better understand and address their
requirements
• Focus on high-priority needs, through rigorous project selection and
regular review of the entire research and development portfolio
2. Leverage technical
expertise to assist DHS
components’ efforts to
establish operational
requirements and select
and acquire needed
technologies
• Use the Science and Technology Directorate’s (S&T) technical
expertise to provide analytical support to DHS
• Implement processes that strengthen project management,
evaluation, and accountability within the directorate
• Incent owners of critical infrastructure and key resources to adopt
technologies that reduce vulnerabilities and increase resilience
S&T
Goals and Programs
Goals
3. Strengthen the HSE
and first responder’s
capabilities to protect
the homeland and
respond to disasters.
Objectives
Create high-impact technologies and knowledge products – such as
standards and protocols – that facilitate the safety, effectiveness, and
ease with which first responders do their work
Provide the link between operators in the field and the evolving world
of research and development
Increase first responders’ access to information on best practices and
product performance standards
S&T
Goals and Programs
Goals
4. Conduct, catalyze,
and survey scientific
discoveries and
inventions relevant to
existing and emerging
homeland security
challenges.
Objectives
• Leverage the investment and expertise of other government
agencies, the private sector, academia, and international partners
• Leverage academia to address homeland security needs and nurture
the future technical workforce of the HSE
• Participate in ongoing federal interagency efforts at both the policy
and programmatic levels
• Execute bilateral agreements to leverage funds, manpower, and
facilities in support of the mission
• Encourage the private sector, with a focus on small business
engagement, to develop technologies relevant to the HSE
• Improve S&T’s knowledge and use of relative national and
international research and facilities with a focus on Department of
Energy (DOE) National Labs and DOE efforts
• Leverage the scientific expertise, knowledge, and capabilities of the
S&T labs, as well as the DOE and international laboratories, to
provide advanced and innovative knowledge, analyses, and solutions
in support of the HSE
• Ensure effective construction and utilization of S&T laboratories in
support of homeland security missions
S&T
Goals and Programs
Goals
5. Foster a culture of
innovation and learning,
in S&T and across DHS,
that addresses
challenges with
scientific, analytic, and
technical rigor.
Objectives
• Evolve the understanding of current and future homeland security
risks and opportunities and foster a culture of innovation
• Increase S&T and the Department’s awareness of cutting-edge
research and technology developments pertinent to DHS missions
• Promote a culture of openness, continual learning, innovation, and
collaboration within S&T and across DHS
• Internally promote synergies and eliminate programmatic
redundancies by creating mechanisms and processes to increase
information sharingLeverage the investment and expertise of other
government agencies, the private sector, academia, and
international partners
S&T
Groups
Divisions
Sub-Divisions
Support to the
Homeland Security
Enterprise and First
Responders Group
• Office for Interoperability and Compatibility (OIC)
• First Responder Technologies (R-Tech)
• National Urban Security Technology Laboratory (NUSTL).
Homeland Security
Advanced Research
Projects Agency
•
•
•
•
•
•
Acquisition Support
and Operations
Analysis
• Capstone Analysis and Requirements Office
• Office of Systems Engineering Test & Evaluation and Standards Office
• Test & Evaluation and Standards Office
Research and
Development
Partnerships
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Borders and Maritime Security Division
Chemical and Biological Defense Division
Cybersecurity Division
Explosives Division
Human Factors and Behavioral Sciences Division
Infrastructure Protection and Disaster Management Division
Interagency Office
International Cooperative Programs Office
Office of National Laboratories
Office of Public-Private Partnerships
Small Business Innovative Research Office
Office of University Programs
Special Projects Office
S&T
Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency
Divisions
Focus
Borders and Maritime
Security Division
Technologies that help enhance the security of our nation's borders and
waterways without impeding the flow of commerce and travelers.
Chemical and
Biological Defense
Division
• Agricultural Defense, Chemical and Biological Research and
Development
• Threat Characterization and Attribution
Cybersecurity Division
• National cyberspace response system
• Cyber-risk management program for protection of critical
infrastructure.
S&T
Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency
Divisions
Explosives Division
Focus
• Automated high-speed, high-performance checked baggage explosives
detection system with reduced false alarm rates, improved
throughput, and reduced operation and maintenance cost for
screening checked baggage.
• Next generation threat detection system for TSA passenger check
points to screen evolving threats while improving passenger
experience.
• An enhanced ability of screening systems and operators to detect
explosives and IED components within cargo parcels and pallets.
• Tools, techniques and knowledge to better understand, train and
utilize the explosive detection canine.
• New or improved technical capabilities to detect person born IEDs at a
standoff distance.
• Methods for detecting trace explosives on people and personal items
at a standoff distance.
• Solutions to protect the nations surface transportation systems.
• Knowledge on homemade explosives detection thresholds and threat
quantities for detection.
S&T
Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency
Divisions
Focus
Human Factors and
Behavioral Sciences
Division
• Enhance the analytical capability of the Department to understand
terrorist motivation, intent, and behavior
• Improve screening by providing a science-based capability to identify
unknown threats indicated by deceptive and suspicious behavior.
• Improve screening by providing a science-based capability to identify
known threats through accurate, timely, and easy-to-use biometric
identification and credentialing tools.
• Enhance safety, effectiveness, and usability of technology by
systematically incorporating user and public input.
• Enhance preparedness and mitigate impacts of catastrophic events by
delivering capabilities that incorporate social, psychological and
economic aspects of societal resilience.
Infrastructure
Protection and
Disaster Management
Division
• High Performance and Integrated Design Resilience Program
• High Performance and Integrated Design Resilience Program
Databases and Tools
• Building and Infrastructure Protection Series Tools
• Building and Infrastructure Protection Series Workshops
S&T
FY2013 R&D Priorities
Investment
Objectives
Biological
Defense
$135.4M
Development of tools to detect intentional and natural biologic events; focus on
rapid point-of-care diagnostic technologies, cost-effective indoor sensors,
bioforensics, and mandated CBRN risk assessments.
Explosives
Defense
$119.7M
Technologies detecting explosives, with an emphasis on Home Made Explosives
and other advanced threats.
Cyber
Security
$64.5M
Unclassified research programs in support of the internet infrastructure: research
into identity and data privacy technologies, end system security, law enforcement
forensic capabilities, software assurance, and cybersecurity education.
First
Responders
$49.3M
Identify technologies, formulate standards and develop knowledge products that
enhance the productivity, efficiency, and safety of first responders. Priority
investment areas include: interoperable communications, data sharing systems,
field-ready detection equipment, and enhancements to protective gear.
Apex Projects
$15.0M
Cross-cutting, multi-disciplinary efforts requested by DHS Components that are
high priority, high-value, and short turn-around in nature.
$94.1M
Resume research and development (R&D) in important areas that received little
or no funding in FY 2012 such as Border Security, Chemical Attack Resiliency,
Counterterrorism, Information Sharing, and Interoperability.
HOMELAND SECURITY PPBE DECISION
MAKERS
DHS PPBE
Budget Review Board
Members
• Chair: Deputy Secretary
• Review, make
• Vice Chair: Under Secretary, Management
recommendations on
• Under Secretary, Border and Transportation Security
the FYSHP;
• Under Secretary, Emergency Preparedness and Response
• Review, make
• Under Secretary, lnformation Analysis and Infrastructure
recommendations on
Protection
the President's
• Under Secretary, Science and Technology
budget request;
• Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard
• Director, U.S. Secret Service
• Reviewing fund and
• Director, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
program
• DHS Chief of Staff
performance;
• Office of Policy, Planning, and International Affairs
• Minimizing the re• General Counsel
evaluation of
• Assistant Secretary for Legislative Affairs
decisions in the
• Chief Financial Officer (CFO)
absence of new
• Chief Procurement Officer (CPO)
information or new
• Chief lnformation Officer (CIO)
factors.
• Advisors: Director, Budget Division and Director, Office of Program
Analysis & Evaluation, Office of the CFO
Role
DHS PPBE
Joint Requirements Council
Role
•
Identify common
opportunities and non-IT
requirements across DHS
•
Review non-IT mission
needs statements, capital
investment plans,
portfolio management
documents and special
interest issues;
•
Make programmatic
recommendations to the
Investment Review Board
on proposed new
programs and changes to
existing capital programs
Members
• Chair- Rotates among COOs of DHS Organizational
Elements
• Executive Secretary- Director, Program Analysis &
Evaluation
• Chief of Staff, Management
• Operations Director, Border & Transportation Security
• Chief Operating Officer, Emergency Preparedness &
Response
• Chief of Staff, Science & Technology
• Chief of Staff, Info Analysis & Infrastructure Protection
• Chief of Staff, U.S. Coast Guard
• Chief of Staff, U.S. Secret Service
• Chief of Staff, Bureau of Citizenship Services
• Chief Operating Officer, Transportation Security
Administration
• Chief Operating Officer, Customs and Border Protection
• Chief Operating Officer, Immigrations and Customs
Enforcement
DHS PPBE
Office of Policy
Role
Components
• Leads the "planning" portion of the PPBE
process including risk assessments and
management, unconstrained strategic
assessment of operational capability
requirements, and setting strategic policy
planning priorities;
• Office of Policy Development
• Leads the development of the DHS
lntegrated Strategic Assessment Report and
the Secretary's lntegrated Planning
Guidance (IPG) with support from the DHS
Operational Integration Staff (I-STAFF) and
the Program Analysis and Evaluation (PA&E)
office;
• Provides policy support to, and participating
on, the Budget Review Board.
• Office of Strategic Plans
• Office for State and Local Law
• Office of International Affairs
• Office of Immigration Statistics
• Private Sector Office
• Homeland Security Advisory
Council

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