Prevention: Developing Schoolwide & Classroom Systems

Report
DE-PBS School-wide
Positive Behavior
Supports
Team Training
June 18 & 19, 2013
Prevention:
Developing
Schoolwide &
Classroom Systems
DE-PBS Key Features for SW
• Program Development & Evaluation
• Problem-Solving/Leadership Team
• Data
• Professional Development & Resources
• Developing SW and Classroom Systems to Prevent Problem
Behavior
• Expectations, Teaching and Recognition
• Positive relationships
• Correcting Problem Behaviors
• Consistent and clear procedures
• Disciplinary encounters used as learning opportunities to teach
problem solving strategies
• Developing Self-Discipline
Key Feature 2
• Recognize that ALL students benefit from positive behavioral
supports. This includes students with and without behavior
problems or disabilities, and requires sensitivity to individual
and cultural differences.
Key Feature 3
Recognize the critical importance of preventing behavior
problems. This is evident throughout school policies and
evidence-based practices, especially in preventive
classroom management, clear school-wide expectations,
and school-wide teaching and recognition of positive
behaviors. It also is seen in positive teacher-student,
student-student, and school-family relations.
Developing SW and Classroom
Systems to Prevent Problem Behavior
• Expectations
• Expectation
development
• Posting
• Teaching
• Kick off
• Lesson plans
• Recognition
• Matrix
• Recognition
delivery
• Positive relationships
• Teacher-student
• Student-student
• School/teacher home
Do we have high expectations for
students’ social and academic
success?
YES!
Of course we do!
Absolutely!
Points to Ponder
• How do we identify and explain the desirable
behaviors students should demonstrate, leading
to social-emotional and academic success for all?
• How can we transform our focus to promoting
positive behaviors and preventing problem
behaviors v. just eliminating problems?
The Need for commonly defined
rules
• Familiarity with students’ cultural backgrounds enable
teachers to draw on shared knowledge that honors
students’ heritage and preexisting knowledge.
• By creating inclusive classrooms, cultural responsive
schools and teachers decrease opportunities for student
failure and misbehavior by operating in accordance with
a mutually defined protocol of rules and expectations.
Courtesy of Mid-Atlantic Equity Center
School-wide Expectations
Expectations are the umbrella for more specific rules:
• Identify 3 – 5 positively stated expectations
• Use data to determine expectations
• Choose positive actions and terms
• Keep them simple and easy to remember
• Remember to be age appropriate
• Promote self-discipline, positive social and academic
outcomes
Expectation Example
“KOALATY” KIDS:
•
•
•
•
Show Respect
Act Responsibly
Follow Directions
Always do your personal
“Koalaty” best
*SHOW RESPECT
*FOLLOW DIRECTIONS
*ACT RESPONSIBLY
*DO THEIR PERSONAL
KOALATY” BEST
Expectation Example
Cape Henlopen High Expectations
• Commitment
• Achievement
• Pride
• Excellence
School-Wide Expectations
SOAR with the FALCON FOUR:
RESPECT OF:
SELF
OTHERS
LEARNING
SAFETY
Developing a Behavior Matrix
Hallway
Character
Attitude
Vision
Success
Bathroom
Cafeteria
School-Wide Behavioral Matrix
PURPOSES:
Defines the Expected Behaviors for Specific
Settings:
hallways, classrooms, gym, cafeteria, commons,
bus loading, bathrooms, assemblies
Creates the “Curriculum” that will guide the
teaching of expected behaviors.
Enhances communication among staff and
between students and staff.
Illinois PBIS Network, 2011
School-Wide Behavioral Matrix
GUIDELINES:
State definitions positively
Use a few common words
Show what the behavior “looks like”
Behavior Matrix Field Example
In the Cafeteria,
“Be Respectful”
means:
• Wait your turn
• Use a quiet voice
• Clean up after
yourself
In the Bathroom, “Be
Safe” means:
• Walk
• Report spills &
incidents
• One pump of soap &
one paper towel
Classroom
SCHOOLWIDE
EXPECTA
TION
SCHOOLWIDE
EXPECTA
TION
SCHOOLWIDE
EXPECTA
TION
SCHOOLWIDE
EXPECTA
TION
Hallway
Playground
Bathroom
Cafeteria
Library
Specials
(Art,
Music,
PE)
Assembly
/Field
Trip
Bus
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Behavior Expectations in the
Classroom
(B. Simonsen& H. George, 2009)
Rules within Routines Matrix
Routines
Rules
Respect
Responsibility
Safety
Entering the
Classroom
Assignments
/
Homework
Small Group
Activity
Leaving
Classroom
High School Behavior Matrix
problem behavior and teaching behavior
Be Productive
Be Respectful
Be Responsible
Be Appropriate
Classroom
P = Incomplete Assignments
T = Staying with your task
P = Inappropriate language to
peers and adults
T = Say only kind things to and
about others
P = Not having ID, uniform,
learning materials,
T = Be prepared at start of
each day, and start of each
class
P = Display affection
appropriately
T = Understanding school and
classroom rules
Hallway
P= Participating in or watching a
fight
T= Responding to self and/or
adult redirections
P = Using loud voices during
passing periods
T = Importance of moderating
voice in large, crowded areas
P= Grouping during passing
period
T= Walking to the right
P = Not wearing uniform
T = Understanding school
dress code
Lunchroom
P= Leaving behind lunchroom
trash
T= Place tray in garbage when
directed
P = Talking back to peers and
adults in cafeteria line
T = Stay calm, stay in line,
wait your turn
P= Not in correct lunch period,
T= Following personal
schedule
P = Not wearing ID
T = Understanding school and
classroom rules
Bathrooms
P=Not considering time away
from class
T= Recognizing importance of
returning to learning environment
P=Not waiting turn
T= Walk in and out quietly
P=Inappropriate use of toilets,
sinks, and dryers
T=Keep bathroom clean
P= Not respecting others’
privacy
T= Keep to yourself
Extra Curricular
Activities
P= Wandering halls
T= Importance of staying in and
participating in activity
P = Ignoring adult directives
T= Identifying adult
supervisors of extra-curricular
activities
P= Using cell phone
T= Recognizing school and
classroom rules apply to extra
curricular activities
P = Hanging around lockers,
T = At end of school day, go
directly home or to specific
activity
Illinois PBIS Network, 2011
Behavioral Expectations
To Be Developed
• What is going well?
• What do our data
indicate as problems?
• How can we convert
these to positive
behaviors?
• As a team, identify and
prioritize 3 – 5
positively stated
expectations.
To Be Reviewed/Revised
• Discuss your current
expectations with your
team.
• Do these meet your
needs?
• Do they address
concerns identified by
your data?
• Are they clear and easy
to remember?
• Are they few in number?
• Are they positively
stated?
PBS Matrix Activity
To Be Developed
• Break into groups by
location (not including
classroom)
• Define what each
expectation will look like
in one location or area of
the school
• Be sure to have at least
1 location complete
To Be Reviewed/Revised
• Break into groups by
location
• Review existing matrix
• Address new
expectations or areas
Are definitions stated positively?
Were common and few words
used?
Does it show what the behavior
“looks like”?
School-wide Expectation
Visibility
• Promote joint ownership and responsibility
for meeting expectations among staff,
students and community
• Posting expectations & matrix components
per location provide reference tools for precorrection & correction of misbehavior
• Include expectation language in schoolbased materials: agenda books, code of
conduct, school promotional items (pencils,
t-shirts, etc.)
• Represent expectations in various ways to
support understanding (pictures/art, words)
Illinois DHS PBS Staff Matrix
What it means to
be part of the
“BARB” Staff…
Administrators
Assistants
Coaches/Advisors
Custodians
Lunch Personnel
Security
Secretaries
Student
Services/Nurse
Substitutes
Teachers/Media
Center
Be
Responsible
Achieve
Academically
Respect
Self & Others
Be
Proud
*Support the
attendance
policy
*Model positive
Barb behavior
*Arrive on-time
*Be prepared
*Promote
professional and
learning
standards
*Expect
excellence
*Acknowledge
and support
peers as well as
students
*Greet students
*Be friendly
*Make a
difference at DHS
*Contribute to
the DHS school
community
*Actively
supervise
*Model
appropriate dress
code
*Acknowledge
effort
*Collaborate
Every adult on the DHS staff can affect student behavior in a
positive manner if we model that behavior when we interact with each
other.
Developing SW and Classroom
Systems to Prevent Problem Behavior
• Expectations
• Expectation
development
• Posting
• Teaching
• Kick off
• Lesson plans
• Recognition
• Matrix
• Recognition
delivery
• Positive relationships
• Teacher-student
• Student-student
• School/teacher home
Teaching
Expectations:
Creating Cool
Tools
Core
Feature
PBIS Implementation Goal
G. Lesson
29. A behavioral curriculum includes Teaching expectations and
Plans for
rules
Teaching
30. Lesson Plans include examples and non-examples
Expectations/
Rules
31. Lessons use a variety of teaching strategies.
32. Lessons are embedded into subject area curriculum
33. Faculty/staff and students are involved in development &
delivery of behavioral curriculum
34. Strategies to share key features of SWPBS program with
families/community are developed and implemented.
Once you have developed school-wide
expectations, it is not enough to just post
the words on the walls of the classroom…
YOU MUST TEACH THEM!
Why Develop a System for Teaching
Behavior?
• We can no longer assume:
• Students know the expectations/rules and
appropriate ways to behave
• Students will learn appropriate behaviors quickly
and effectively without consistent practice and
modeling
Why Develop a System for Teaching
Behavior?
• We must assume:
• Students will require different curricula,
instructional modalities, etc… to learn appropriate
behavior
• We need to teach expectations/rules and
appropriate behaviors as effectively as we teach
academic skills
Remember…
“You are a primary model for appropriate
behavior.”
The IRIS Center
http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu
How do you teach behavioral expectations?
Respect
Ourselves
Respect Our
Community
Respect Our
Environment
33
• Teach in the actual settings where
behaviors are to occur
• Teach the words by demonstrating
the actions using examples and
non-examples.
• Model and practice to fluency
• Build a social culture that is
predictable and focused on
student success
SETTING
Expectations
Teaching
Matrix
All
Settings
Hallways
Playgrounds
Cafeteria
Library/
Compute
r Lab
Study,
read,
compute.
Sit in one
spot.
Watch for
your stop.
Assembly
Bus
Respect
Ourselves
Be on task.
Give your
best effort.
Be
prepared.
Walk.
Have a plan.
Eat all your
food.
Select
healthy
foods.
Respect
Others
Be kind.
Hands/feet
to self.
Help/share
with
others.
Use normal
voice
volume.
Walk to
right.
Play safe.
Include
others.
Share
equipment.
Practice
good table
manners
Whisper.
Return
books.
Listen/watch.
Use
appropriate
applause.
Use a quiet
voice.
Stay in your
seat.
Recycle.
Clean up
after self.
Pick up
litter.
Maintain
physical
space.
Use
equipment
properly.
Put litter in
garbage can.
Replace
trays &
utensils.
Clean up
eating area.
Push in
chairs.
Treat
books
carefully.
Pick up.
Treat chairs
appropriately.
Wipe your
feet.
Sit
appropriately.
Respect
Property
Teaching Expectations/Rules Using
an Instructional Approach
Define
Observable, measurable
Teach
Identify, prior knowledge, model, structured
practice, acknowledge
Remind
Pre-correct, prompt behaviors/rules prior to
entering natural context
Supervise, feedback/acknowledgement, data
Monitor
Evaluate
Data, modifications needed, non-responders
needing more support
Introductory Events/Kick off
• All faculty and students participate
• Decide on method that will be most effective for your
school
• Consider Importance/Impact - Activity/event should be
a high priority… not given a few minutes in some other
activity
Specially Designed Lessons
• Provide initial lesson plans to begin teaching behavior
• Build on what you have (i.e. character ed.)
• Develop a system for expanding behavior lesson plan ideas
throughout the year
• Skill of the month, Booster Sessions
• Determine the minimum requirements for teaching
behavior (i.e. how often)
Designing a Cool Tool/Behavior
Lesson Plan
Step one: Select the skill to be taught
 Skills are taken directly from the behavioral matrix
 Select skills based on the trends in your data
Step two: Write the lesson plan
 Name the skill & align to school-wide expectation
 Also align with SEL standards
Responsibility is the expectation
• Name the expectation: (Take) Responsibility
• Name the location: Hallway
• Name the skills: Students who take responsibility:
– Move silently
– Walk with hands at your sides
– Own their choices
Cool Tool Template
Purpose of the Lesson / Why it’s important:
1.
2.
Teaching examples:
1.
2.
3.
Student Activities / Role Plays:
1.
2.
3.
Follow-up / acknowledgement activities:
1.
2.
3.
What is our System for Teaching Behavior?
• Introductory Events
• Teaching school all expectations and rules
• On-going Direct Instruction
• Specially designed lessons, character education
• Embedding in Other Curriculum
• Booster Trainings
• Keeping it Out There
• Visual Displays – posters, agenda covers
• Daily announcements
Strategies for Success
• Describe specific, observable behaviors for each
expectation
• Plan for modeling the desired behaviors
• Provide students with written and graphic cues in the
setting where the behaviors are expected
• Acknowledge efforts
• Plan to re-teach and restructure teaching
• Allow students to participate in the development process
• Use “teachable” moments that arise in core subject
areas and in non-academic times
Creative Ideas:“Putting it into Practice”
• Provide students with a script that includes actions and
words expected
• Have classes compete to come up with unique ideas
(student projects, bulletin boards, skits, songs, etc…)
• Recognize staff for creative activities
• Video students role-playing to teach expectations and
rules and show during morning show
• Play “rule charades”
• Writing about an expectation or making a cartoon
• Matching cards with behaviors to expectations
• Using literature
Things to Consider When Making
Teaching Videos
•
•
•
•
•
•
Matches the climate of your building
Data driven
Pair with follow up activity (Discussion, etc.)
Always follow up non-examples with examples
Involve students in the process
Students involved are representative of your student body
Key Feature Status Tracker
• Prevention: Implementing School-wide &
Classroom Systems
• Expectations & Teaching
• Status
• Discuss as a team if components are:
• In Place, Partially in place, Not in Place
• Action Plan
• Discuss as a team the items Partially in place or
Not in Place
• Note activities to be completed, who will do
them and when
Developing SW and Classroom
Systems to Prevent Problem Behavior
• Expectations
• Expectation
development
• Posting
• Teaching
• Kick off
• Lesson plans
• Recognition
• Matrix
• Recognition
delivery
• Positive relationships
• Teacher-student
• Student-student
• School/teacher home
Acknowledgement
Plan
Keep in Mind
• 10 Key Features of PBS
• “Recognition of Positive
Behaviors” is one
component of Key Feature
#3
• There are many other pieces
of the pie!
What motivates students?
Discussion
• What systems of positive reinforcement
are in place in your school?
• Do they affect all students? Do they appeal to all
grades?
• Who is resistant to participate?
• In your view, what is the most powerful
source of reinforcement for students?
“Supports for All, Some and a Few”, Sprague, 2006
Purpose of
Reinforcers/Acknowledgements
• Recognizing desired behavior is a strategy to
prevent behavior problems.
• Teach new behavior
• Strengthen replacement behaviors that
compete with habitual undesirable behavior
• Create frequent positive interactions
between staff and students
Prevention creates more
positive than negative
consequences
Reinforcement
(success)
Punishment
Can rewards be harmful?
• Rewards can be used badly
• If rewards are delivered ambiguously (not clearly tied
to performance of expectation)
• If what we deliver is not a “reward” from the
student’s perspective
• If partial rewards are delivered when full reward is
expected
• If reward is used as bribery
• If large rewards are delivered briefly and then
withdrawn completely
Horner & Goodman, Using Rewards within
School-wide PBIS, www.pbis.org
What do we know about
rewards?
• Rewards are effective when used:
• To build new skills or sustain desired skills, with
• contingent delivery of rewards for specific behavior, and
• gradually faded over time.
• Akin-Little, Eckert, Lovett, Little, 2004
• “In terms of the overall effects of reward, our metaanalysis indicates no evidence for detrimental effects of
reward on measures of intrinsic motivation.”
• Cameron, Banko & Pierce, 2001 p.21
Horner & Goodman Using Rewards
within School-wide PBIS www.pbis.org
Effective Use of Rewards
• Rewards are effective when
• Tied to specific behaviors
• Delivered soon after the behavior
• Age appropriate (actually valued by student)
• Delivered frequently
• Gradually faded away
Horner & Goodman, Using Rewards within
School-wide PBIS, www.pbis.org
Strategic Use of Praise and Rewards
• Use strategically to recognize and reinforce social and
emotional competencies that underlie prosocial behavior
• E.g., students routinely recognized with praise and
rewards for demonstrating empathy, caring,
responsibility, and respect
• Pair reward with verbally labelled praise
Guidelines for Use of
Reinforcers/Acknowledgements
• Tailor the system of acknowledgements to your
school population
• Select ones that are grade appropriate
• Intersperse public vs. individual acknowledgement
for behavior
• Pair verbal praise w/ acknowledgement
• Vary acknowledgements (individual, classroom,
grade level)
Components of
School-Wide
Acknowledgement Plans
Acknowledgement Plan
 Every faculty and staff member acknowledges
appropriate behavior.
 At least 5 to 1 ratio of positive to negative contacts
 System that makes acknowledgement easy and
simple for students and staff.
 Different strategies for acknowledging appropriate
behavior (small frequent rewards more effective)




Beginning of class recognition
Raffles
Open gym
Social acknowledgement
Rob Horner, University of Oregon
www.pbis.org
Parent/Teacher
Association provided
teacher name stamps
Reward tickets and
criteria on lanyard
Write out class tickets for week,
reward when appropriate, check
whose name remains
Visual reminders for staff
Computer
Printed stickers
Tickets and pen
on lanyard
Make it easy to use rewards
Stacks of tickets
glued on edge
Secondary Example
PRIDEbuCk
Positive Behavior Referral
High Frequency Acknowledgements
• Way to quickly and easily reinforce when
students meet the expectations; catch them
being good
• Frequent acknowledgements must be tied to the
School-wide expectations
• These acknowledgements must have value (not
necessarily trinkets, emphasize social
opportunities)
High Frequency Acknowledgements
• Keep the system simple
• Build in opportunities for data collection
• Start Small
• Emphasize the following:
• The importance of enhancing social skills & self-discipline
• The link between appropriate behavior and academic
success
• The link between SW PBS and other SW initiatives (e.g.,
multicultural education & character education)
Adapted from Florida PBS Project
Activities for staff and student
relationship building
• Supporting everyday relationship building:
• Finding/asking about student interests/extracurricular
activities
• Students providing 1-minute reports on areas of their
interest (i.e. sports, drama)
• Attending extracurricular events
• Highlighting student talents (i.e. bulletin board with
newspaper articles)
Activities for staff and student
relationship building
•
•
•
•
Community and service learning activities
Pep rallies
Students earn the chance for staff to do silly things
Staff and student team challenges
• Fund raisers
• Hallway decorating
• Sporting event attendance
Promoting Positive Contacts
Home
•
•
•
•
Positive Behavioral Referral
Phone call logs
Positive post cards (labels pre-made for each student)
Names listed in a parent newsletter
Unexpected/Intermittent
Acknowledgements
• Special focus on each expectation
• Special focus and increased reinforcement based on
referral data – target the problem areas
• Random Classroom Checks
• Random Drawings for students and staff
• Increased worth of acknowledgements given by
substitute teachers
Unexpected Example: Agenda
Drawings
• All agendas are numbered.
• Students are expected to record homework daily for each
subject in their agenda book.
• If there is no homework assigned students should write
“none”.
• If a student is absent they need to write absent in their
agenda.
• Periodically we will call agenda book numbers and students
will bring their book to the office.
• Students who have used their agenda books daily will be
given a prize.
Long Term Celebrations
• Bigger Celebrations for which students can save
their frequent acknowledgements to gain access
• Weekly, monthly, marking period, ½ year, end of
year, DSTP
• You could set criteria: 98% attendance, Less than
1 referral, Passing all classes
• Examples – Popcorn movie parties, sporting
events, field trips, dances, games, etc.
Bad Axe Intermediate
5
- Principal reads story
10 - First class at lunch
15 - 10 min. of extra gym time
20 - Extra recess
25 - Movie and treat
Orchard View
Early Elementary
PBS School-Wide Acknowledgement Matrix
TYPE
WHAT
PAWS
High
Postcards
Frequency
“GOTCHAS” Compliments/
Acknowledgement
Staff and
Activities for
Student teams
Student and
Staff
Relationship Competitions
Building
Promoting
Positive
Contacts
Home
Positive
Behavior
Referrals
WHEN
WHERE
WHO
Given when
expectations
are met; daily
All
building
locations
and bus
All staff;
including
bus drivers,
custodial
staff, etc.
Each
Marking
Period
Pep Rally
Grade
level team
wins award
Staff team
wins points
Each child
receives at
least one
per school
year
All
settings
Administration
processes
referral, a copy
for home – keep
track of total #
with a visual in
the cafeteria
PBS School-Wide Acknowledgement Matrix
TYPE
WHAT
Drawings
by grade
level
Unpredictable/
Intermittent
“BOOSTERS” Classroom
Compliments
Celebrations
Marking
Period
Social/
WHEN
Weekly
Monthly
End of
each MP
WHERE
Collect in
Main Office
Collect in
Guidance
Office
Depends
on Event
Caught
you Red
Handed
Assistant
Admin
announce
Given by all,
but not to own
class
Students w/ 2
or fewer
referrals & 100
bucks
Others attend
booster
Assemblies
Staff
Acknowled
gements
WHO
Each staff
meeting
Box in
Main
Office
Administration
gives you a
sub and a sub
Acknowledgement Plan
• Write acknowledgement plan in narrative form – for
new staff or students and substitutes to help understand
the process
• Remember to evaluate and change your
acknowledgement plan as needed
• Survey students and staff
• PBS team - use data to make a specific
acknowledgement plan (i.e. tardies, cuts, cafeteria clean
up)
Staff Reinforcement Plan
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Staff teams
Staff challenges
Tailgate
Staff fridge
Staff member of the month
Hall of fame
Parking spot of the month
Attendance at student sporting events
Staff Reinforcement Plan
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Raid the supply closet
Blue Jeans day
Professional Development Opportunity
Sub for a Sub
Small tokens in teacher’s mailboxes
Staff socials
Letters to teacher’s classrooms
Chain links in the hallway
Staff notebook that floats around the mailboxes to note nice
messages to each other
Key Feature Status Tracker
• Prevention: Implementing School-wide &
Classroom Systems
• Acknowledgement
• Status
• Discuss as a team if components are:
• In Place, Partially in place, Not in Place
• Action Plan
• Discuss as a team the items Partially in place or
Not in Place
• Note activities to be completed, who will do
them and when
Developing SW and Classroom
Systems to Prevent Problem Behavior
• Expectations
• Expectation
development
• Posting
• Teaching
• Kick off
• Lesson plans
• Recognition
• Matrix
• Recognition
delivery
• Positive relationships
• Teacher-student
• Student-student
• School/teacher home
Positive Relationships
Recognize the critical importance of preventing behavior
problems. This is evident throughout school policies and
evidence-based practices, especially in preventive
classroom management, clear school-wide expectations,
and school-wide teaching and recognition of positive
behaviors. It also is seen in
• positive teacher-student,
• student-student, and
• school-family relations.
The Research on Positive
Relationships
• Teachers with a more relational approach to discipline
have less defiant behavior in their classrooms – which is
explained by adolescent’s trust in authority (Gregory &
Ripski, 2008)
• Teachers who show sensitivity, empathy and praise are
most likely to establish strong relationships with students
(Rey et al., 2007)
Relationship Building Reduces
Problem Behaviors
• “teachers … trained using precorrection, reinforcement
(catch them being goods) for appropriate behaviors, and
active supervison … resulted in a 42% reduction in
problem behaviors” (Oswald et al., 2005).
Home School Collaboration
Advantages of working with parents (guardians, other
adults serving parental role):
•
Students’ attitudes and behavior are greatly
influenced by parents
•
Parental involvement is often necessary to truly
change a student’s behavior
•
Unquestionably, parents can be valuable resources
Measures Used for
Relationship Building
• Delaware Assessment of Strengths and Needs
• School Climate Survey
• Teacher-Student Relations
• Student-Student Relations
• Respect for Diversity
• Teacher-Home Communications
• Staff Relations
Teacher-Student Relationships
• Caring and supportive adult-student relationships. Adults
demonstrate warmth, respect, support, and caring
toward all students (irrespective of gender, race,
ethnicity, socioeconomic background, disabilities,
previous history of behavior). Every student has a
supportive relationship with at least one adult at school.
How are we building positive teacherstudent relationships?
Be that one
person for a
student
• Bond to improve behavior
• Know students as individuals
• Teach by example & self-reflect
as role model
• Focus on positive role models
(Lickona, 2004)
Student-Student Relationship
Building
• Positive relationships with others. Positive relations with
others are expected, taught, and encouraged and
planned opportunities (e.g., extracurricular activities,
class meetings, structured recess activities) are provided
to develop positive relationships.
Home-School Relationship Building
Home-school communication. Clear, positive, bidirectional and regular communication is established
with parents. Parents are routinely informed about the
schoolwide discipline/PBS program, classroom
activities, and their children’s positive behaviors.
Parents know who to contact with questions or
comments about the schoolwide program and the
school regularly encourages their input.
Parent-School Collaboration
Home-school collaboration.
Positive and collaborative
relationships established with
parents. Parents’ roles in
developing the school
discipline/PBS program are
established, and their
feedback is regularly solicited
as part of program evaluation.
Key Feature Status Tracker
• Prevention: Implementing School-wide &
Classroom Systems
• Positive Relationships
• Status
• Discuss as a team if components are:
• In Place, Partially in place, Not in Place
• Action Plan
• Discuss as a team the items Partially in place or
Not in Place
• Note activities to be completed, who will do
them and when
Exit Ticket
•
•
•
•
District & School Name
Team Leader(s): Name and email address
Tentative Kick Off Time
1 Year Goal: By June 19, 2014 what measureable goal will
you have accomplished?
• What support might your team need to move forward?
Fall Workshop Agenda
DE-PBS Key Features for SW
• Program Development & Evaluation
• Problem-Solving/Leadership Team
• Data
• Professional Development & Resources
• Developing SW and Classroom Systems to Prevent Problem
Behavior
• Expectations, Teaching and Recognition
• Positive relationships
• Correcting Problem Behaviors
• Consistent and clear procedures
• Disciplinary encounters used as learning opportunities to teach
problem solving strategies
• Developing Self-Discipline

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