New Team Training Overview

Report
Building Systems that Promote and
Sustain Evidence Based Practice
PBIS New Team Training
2014
Susan Barrett
Implementer Partner, Center on PBIS
PBIS Regional TTAC
Sheppard Pratt Health System
[email protected]
PowerPoint and training content available
www.pbismaryland.org
Other websites
www.pbis.org
www.pbisilliniois.org
2
Goals for Today
Introduction to the PBIS Framework
Big Ideas to promote change
Using the BOQ to launch PBIS effort
3
Team Training Expectations
EXPECTATION
BEHAVIOR
BE
RESPONSIBLE
 Make yourself comfortable
 Take care of your needs
 Return quickly and quietly
 Tell us your questions
BE
RESPECTFUL
 Turn cell phones off or to “vibrate”
 Listen to others attentively
 Contribute to the team
 Follow up on assigned tasks
BE
ENGAGED
 Share your passion
 Take notes
 Plan with your team
 Have FUN!!!!
4
PBIS Framework
• Defined
• Outcomes
• 3 Big Ideas: What makes this acronym
different?
– Implementation Science: Fits the context and
culture
– Workforce Development: “Press and Support”
– Equal Priority: Emotional Health and Wellbeing,
Executive Functioning Skills
5
Equal Priority
Academic Rigor
Social Emotional
Health/ Mental
Wellness/Physical
Health
Close the Global
Gap and
Healthy Country
Healthcare/economy
Adapted from © Fixsen and Blase 2013, Barrett
2013
Organizational
Health:
Workforce
What is
School-wide Positive Behavior Support?
• School-wide PBIS is:
– IS a decision making framework that guides selection,
integration, and implementation of the best evidence-based
academic and behavioral practices for improving important
academic and behavior outcomes for all students.
• Evidence-based features of SW-PBIS
– Prevention
– Define and teach positive social expectations
– Acknowledge positive behavior
– Arrange consistent consequences for problem behavior
– On-going collection and use of data for decision-making
– Continuum of intensive, individual interventions.
– Administrative leadership – Team-based implementation
(Systems that support effective practices)
PBIS Implementation Framework
Social Emotional and Behavioral Health
• We organize our resources
– Multi-Tier Mapping, Gap Analysis
• So kids get help early
– Actions based on outcomes (data!), not procedures
• We do stuff that’s likely to work
– Evidence-Based interventions
• We provide supports to staff to do it right
– Fidelity: Benchmarks of Quality
• And make sure they’re successful
–
–
–
–
Coaching and Support
Progress monitoring and performance feedback
Problem-Solving process
Increasing levels of intensity
Establishing the Conditions for Learning
School Climate
Engagement
Safety
Environment
Relationships
Emotional Safety
Physical
Environment
Respect for
Diversity
Physical Safety
Academic
Environment
School
Participation
Substance Use
Wellness
Disciplinary
Environment
3/11/2012
Kristen Harper, Office of Safe and Healthy Students, United States Department of Education
Three Tiered Model of Student Supports
get these tiers
of support
These students
+
The goal of the tiers is student success, not labeling.
in order to meet
benchmarks.
=
TIER I: Core, Universal
GOAL: 100% of students achieve
at high levels
Tier I: Implementing well researched
programs and practices demonstrated to
produce good outcomes for the majority of
students.
Tier I: Effective if at least 80% are meeting
benchmarks with access to Core/Universal
Instruction.
Tier I: Begins with clear goals:
1.What exactly do we expect all students to
learn ?
2.How will we know if and when they’ve
learned it?
3.How you we respond when some
students don’t learn?
4.How will we respond when some
students have already learned?
Questions 1 and 2 help us ensure a
guaranteed and viable core curriculum
11
11
Impacts of SW-PBIS on Student Outcomes
• Significant reduction in school-level suspensions
• Students in PBIS schools were 32% less likely to
receive an office discipline referral
• A positive effect for school-level academic
performance (Bradshaw et al., JPBI, 2010)
• Significant reductions in teacher-rated behavior
problems
• Rejection & bullying (Waasdorp, Bradshaw, & Leaf, 2012)
• Service use (e.g., counseling, special education referral,
office referrals)
• Reductions in concentration problems and
aggressive/disruptive behavior, and improvements in
prosocial behavior and emotion regulation (Bradshaw et al.,
submitted)
• Some indication that the intervention effects are strongest the earlier
students are exposed to SW-PBIS (Bradshaw et al., submitted)
Big Idea #1
Implementation Science
• Implementation is not a single event
• A mission-oriented process involving multiple
decisions, actions, and correctionsContinuous Improvement/Regeneration
• Uses stages to make the process of change
doable
• Anchored to tiered framework
• Always connected to strategic plan
Stages of Implementation
Focus
Should we
do it
Stage
Exploration/
Adoption
Decision regarding commitment to adopting
the program/practices and supporting
successful implementation.
Installation
Set up infrastructure so that successful
implementation can take place and be
supported. Establish team and data systems,
conduct audit, develop plan.
Initial
Implementation
Try out the practices, work out details, learn
and improve before expanding to other
contexts.
Elaboration
Expand the program/practices to other
locations, individuals, times- adjust from
learning in initial implementation.
Continuous
Improvement/Re
generation
Make it easier, more efficient. Embed within
current practices.
Getting it
right
Making it
better
Description
The “What” and The “How”
Big Idea #2 Workforce Development
Snider 2006
“ I learned very little in my undergraduate teacher
education program about how to teach; and for
those 8 years I relied on luck, trial and error and the
competence of colleagues for my professional
development. I regret that I didn’t know more from
the beginning because despite my earnest efforts, my
students didn’t achieve as much as they could have. I
knew very little about curriculum, effective teaching,
or principles of classroom management beyond what
I learned on the job.” (p. 2)
System Change
“For every increment of performance I demand
from you, I have an equal responsibility to
provide you with the capacity to meet that
expectation”
(R. Elmore, 2002)
Training Outcomes Related to Training Components
Press and Support
Training Outcomes
Training
Components
Presentation/
Lecture
Plus
Demonstration
Plus
Practice
Plus Coaching/
Admin Support
Data Feedback
Knowledge of
Content
Skill
Implementation
Classroom
Application
10%
5%
0%
30%
20%
0%
60%
60%
5%
95%
95%
Joyce & Showers, 2002
95%
Leaders…“Call to Action”
How do we ensure that all students have access to effective
practices that are implemented with fidelity and sustained over
time?
**2 key components for School Improvement:
1. Professional Development – Nurture the growth and
development of our staff!!!
Focus on skill development and support of individual educators
2. Organization Capacity-Learn and be adaptive
Focus on strong collaborative work cultures
Big Idea #3
We are Social Beings first and
foremost!!!
• Neurobiology and Social Connectedness
• Kernels of EBP within an implementation
framework….
– Imitation to empathy – modeling behavior we
want to see around us
– Fostering mutual care
Relationships and Youth
Connectedness
ESSENTIAL to children’s well being.
• A sample of 2,022 students (999 boys and 1,023 girls) ages 12-14
years was measured at two time points twelve months apart on
school connectedness and mental health symptoms (general
functioning, depression, and anxiety symptoms). After adjusting
for any prior conditions that could have led to mental health
problems, the authors of the study reported stronger than
previous evidence of the association with school connectedness
and adolescent depressive symptoms and a predictive link
between school connectedness to future mental health
problems.
• 22 Early studies suggest that there are substantial percentages
of violent youth who do not perceive themselves to be liked by
classmates and who report loneliness.
(Clin, 2006 Adol Psychology)
Worry
• Do we live in a
punishing work
environment ?
• How do we create
systems that support
staff?
22
Get honest about issues or concerns
in your building
– Administrator is key!! Establish a kind of
“haven”- place that individuals can get feel
safe about reporting concerns, supported by
school community and empowered to be a
part of the decision making process“Community of Practice”
–
–
Tools: Self Assessment, Fidelity Checks, ODRs, climate
surveys, satisfaction surveys
Provide data summaries within a week of return – decide
best approach to deliver feedback
23
Impacts of SW-PBIS on Student Outcomes
• Significant reduction in school-level suspensions
• Students in PBIS schools were 32% less likely to
receive an office discipline referral
• A positive effect for school-level academic
performance (Bradshaw et al., JPBI, 2010)
• Significant reductions in teacher-rated behavior
problems
• Rejection & bullying (Waasdorp, Bradshaw, & Leaf, 2012)
• Service use (e.g., counseling, special education referral,
office referrals)
• Reductions in concentration problems and
aggressive/disruptive behavior, and improvements in
prosocial behavior and emotion regulation (Bradshaw et al.,
submitted)
• Some indication that the intervention effects are strongest the earlier
students are exposed to SW-PBIS (Bradshaw et al., submitted)
SW PBIS Critical Elements
1. PBIS Team
2. Faculty/Staff Commitment
3. Effective Procedures for Dealing with Problem
Behaviors
4. Data Entry and Analysis Plan Established
5. Expectations and Rules Developed
6. Acknowledgement System Established
7. Develop Plans for Teaching Expectations/Rules
8. Implementation Plan
9. Classroom Systems
10.Evaluation
Our Day
• Outcome: Personalized School Action Plan
–
–
–
–
–
Anchored on Benchmarks of Quality
Activity Based: “Conversation Starters”
Resources: Electronic
Coach for guiding and facilitating
3-5 Years
• Action Planning Form
• Computer: Access to pbismaryland -USED ALL YEAR
• Role Assignments (note taker, facilitator, time keeper)
26
Group Roles
Facilitator- The facilitator ensures that the group moves smoothly
through the task at hand. This person seeks information and
opinions, asks for facts and feelings from each team member, and
summarizes main points of discussion. This role is very important
because the facilitator leads the group through the task.
Recorder/Minute Taker- The recorder writes down the work of the
group. This can involve writing words or sentences, drawing
pictures, or simply taking notes of an activity. This role is very
important because it is necessary to keep a record of the work
done.
Time Keeper - This person takes on two roles. First of all, they are
responsible for keeping up with the time. It is very important that
the group is aware of how much time they have to complete the
task as well as reminders on when the time is growing short.
Reporter/Communicator- This person is responsible for reporting
back the work of their small group to the presenter or to the larger
group. This role is very important because this communication to
the large group will be crucial in the learning process.
Encourager- This person is responsible for keeping the group
motivated and on task. The encourager acts as the cheerleader as
the group moves though their various tasks providing behavior
specific praise. This role is very important because it is crucial that
the group stays on task as time is limited.
PBIS
• Examine Current Condition
– Terms of Reference
– Resource Mapping
– Working Smarter to support staff
What kind of school to you want your school to be?
What are the outcomes you seek?
28
Activity
Terms of Reference
• Words have meaning
• What do they mean to you?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Discipline
Suspension
Office Referral
Bullying
At Risk
Graduation Requirements
State Accountability Tests
29
Activity Resource Mapping
30
Before you add one more thing….
www.safetycenter.navy.mil
Triangle
Activity:
Applying the
Three-Tiered
Logic to
Your School
Tier 3
Practices, Initiatives, Programs for a FEW
Tier 2
Practices, Initiatives, Programs for
SOME
Tier 1
Practices, Initiatives, Programs for
ALL
Resource Mapping
• What are the practices in place at each tier of
the triangle?
• Are they evidence-based practices?
• How are you measuring effectiveness of
practices (data)?
• Who are the service delivery
teams/personnel?
33

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